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Phone Answering Service in Arizona

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    • 1 to 3 days

      Phoenix

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

    • 1 to 3 days

      Mesa

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • PHOENIX

  • MESA

  • AGUILA

  • AJO

  • ALPINE

  • AMADO

  • APACHE JUNCTION

  • ARIVACA

  • ARIZONA CITY

  • ARLINGTON

  • ASH FORK

  • AVONDALE

  • BAGDAD

  • BAPCHULE

  • BELLEMONT

  • BENSON

  • BISBEE

  • BLACK CANYON CITY

  • BLUE

  • BLUE GAP

  • BOUSE

  • BOWIE

  • BUCKEYE

  • BULLHEAD CITY

  • BYLAS

  • CAMERON

  • CAMP VERDE

  • CAREFREE

  • CASA GRANDE

  • CASHION

  • CATALINA

  • CAVE CREEK

  • CENTRAL

  • CHAMBERS

  • CHANDLER

  • CHANDLER HEIGHTS

  • CHINLE

  • CHINO VALLEY

  • CHLORIDE

  • CIBECUE

  • CIBOLA

  • CLARKDALE

  • CLAY SPRINGS

  • CLAYPOOL

  • CLIFTON

  • COCHISE

  • COLORADO CITY

  • CONCHO

  • CONGRESS

  • COOLIDGE

  • CORNVILLE

  • CORTARO

  • COTTONWOOD

  • CROWN KING

  • DATELAND

  • DENNEHOTSO

  • DEWEY

  • DOLAN SPRINGS

  • DOUGLAS

  • DRAGOON

  • DUNCAN

  • EAGAR

  • EDEN

  • EHRENBERG

  • EL MIRAGE

  • ELFRIDA

  • ELGIN

  • ELOY

  • FLAGSTAFF

  • FLORENCE

  • FOREST LAKES

  • FORT APACHE

  • FORT DEFIANCE

  • FORT HUACHUCA

  • FORT MCDOWELL

  • FORT MOHAVE

  • FORT THOMAS

  • FOUNTAIN HILLS

  • FREDONIA

  • GADSDEN

  • GANADO

  • GILA BEND

  • GILBERT

  • GLENDALE

  • GLENDALE LUKE AFB

  • GLOBE

  • GOLD CANYON

  • GOLDEN VALLEY

  • GOODYEAR

  • GRAND CANYON

  • GRAY MOUNTAIN

  • GREEN VALLEY

  • GREER

  • HACKBERRY

  • HAPPY JACK

  • HAYDEN

  • HEBER

  • HEREFORD

  • HIGLEY

  • HOLBROOK

  • HOTEVILLA

  • HOUCK

  • HUACHUCA CITY

  • HUALAPAI

  • HUMBOLDT

  • INDIAN WELLS

  • JEROME

  • JOSEPH CITY

  • KAIBETO

  • KAYENTA

  • KEAMS CANYON

  • KEARNY

  • KINGMAN

  • KIRKLAND

  • KYKOTSMOVI VILLAGE

  • LAKE HAVASU CITY

  • LAKE MONTEZUMA

  • LAKESIDE

  • LAVEEN

  • LEUPP

  • LITCHFIELD PARK

  • LITTLEFIELD

  • LUKACHUKAI

  • LUKEVILLE

  • LUPTON

  • MAMMOTH

  • MANY FARMS

  • MARANA

  • MARBLE CANYON

  • MARICOPA

  • MAYER

  • MC NEAL

  • MCNARY

  • MEADVIEW

  • MIAMI

  • MOHAVE VALLEY

  • MORENCI

  • MORMON LAKE

  • MORRISTOWN

  • MOUNT LEMMON

  • MUNDS PARK

  • NACO

  • NAZLINI

  • NEW RIVER

  • NOGALES

  • NORTH RIM

  • NUTRIOSO

  • OATMAN

  • ORACLE

  • OVERGAARD

  • PAGE

  • PALO VERDE

  • PARADISE VALLEY

  • PARKER

  • PARKS

  • PATAGONIA

  • PAULDEN

  • PAYSON

  • PEACH SPRINGS

  • PEARCE

  • PEORIA

  • PERIDOT

  • PETRIFIED FOREST NATL PK

  • PICACHO

  • PIMA

  • PINE

  • PINEDALE

  • PINETOP

  • PINON

  • PIRTLEVILLE

  • POLACCA

  • POMERENE

  • POSTON

  • PRESCOTT

  • PRESCOTT VALLEY

  • QUARTZSITE

  • QUEEN CREEK

  • RED ROCK

  • RED VALLEY

  • RILLITO

  • RIMROCK

  • RIO RICO

  • RIO VERDE

  • ROCK POINT

  • ROLL

  • ROOSEVELT

  • ROUND ROCK

  • SACATON

  • SAFFORD

  • SAHUARITA

  • SAINT DAVID

  • SAINT JOHNS

  • SAINT MICHAELS

  • SALOME

  • SAN CARLOS

  • SAN LUIS

  • SAN MANUEL

  • SAN SIMON

  • SAN TAN VALLEY

  • SANDERS

  • SASABE

  • SCOTTSDALE

  • SECOND MESA

  • SEDONA

  • SELIGMAN

  • SELLS

  • SHONTO

  • SHOW LOW

  • SIERRA VISTA

  • SKULL VALLEY

  • SNOWFLAKE

  • SOLOMON

  • SOMERTON

  • SONOITA

  • SPRINGERVILLE

  • STANFIELD

  • SUN CITY

  • SUN CITY WEST

  • SUN VALLEY

  • SUPAI

  • SUPERIOR

  • SURPRISE

  • TACNA

  • TAYLOR

  • TEEC NOS POS

  • TEMPE

  • TEMPLE BAR MARINA

  • THATCHER

  • TOLLESON

  • TOMBSTONE

  • TONALEA

  • TONOPAH

  • TONTO BASIN

  • TOPAWA

  • TOPOCK

  • TORTILLA FLAT

  • TSAILE

  • TUBA CITY

  • TUBAC

  • TUCSON

  • TUMACACORI

  • VAIL

  • VALENTINE

  • VALLEY FARMS

  • VERNON

  • WADDELL

  • WELLTON

  • WENDEN

  • WHITE MOUNTAIN LAKE

  • WHITERIVER

  • WICKENBURG

  • WIKIEUP

  • WILLCOX

  • WILLIAMS

  • WILLOW BEACH

  • WINDOW ROCK

  • WINKELMAN

  • WINSLOW

  • WITTMANN

  • WOODRUFF

  • YARNELL

  • YOUNG

  • YOUNGTOWN

  • YUCCA

  • YUMA
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in Arizona?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in Arizona. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in Arizona?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in Arizona. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in Arizona?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in Arizona. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of Arizona

    Arizona is a state located in the southwestern region of the United States. Arizona is also part of the Western United States and of the Mountain West states. Arizona is the sixth most extensive and the 15th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. The second largest city is Tucson, followed in population by eight cities of the Phoenix metropolitan area: Mesa, Chandler, Glendale, Scottsdale, Gilbert, Tempe, Peoria, and Surprise.
    Arizona is the 48th state and last of the contiguous states to be admitted to the Union, and it achieved statehood on February 14, 1912. Arizona is noted for its desert climate in its southern half, where there are very hot summers and quite mild winters. The northern half of Arizona also features forests of pine, Douglas fir, and spruce trees, a very large, high plateau (the Colorado Plateau) and some mountain ranges-such as the San Francisco Mountains-as well as large, deep canyons, where there is much more moderate weather for three seasons of the year, plus significant snowfalls. There are ski resorts in the areas of Flagstaff and Alpine.
    Arizona is one of the Four Corners states. Arizona has borders with New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, California, and Mexico, and it has one point in common with the southwestern corner of Colorado. Arizona has a 389-mile (626 km)-long international border with the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California.
    Arizona is the most populous landlocked state of the United States, assuming that coastline on the Great Lakes counts against being landlocked (otherwise, it is second to Michigan). In addition to the Grand Canyon National Park, several national forests, national parks, and national monuments are located in Arizona. About one-quarter of Arizona is federal land that serves as the home of the Navajo Nation, the Hopi tribe, the Tohono O’odham, the Apache tribe, the Yavapai people, the Yaqui people, the Zuni people, the Pima people, the Hia C-e? O’odham and various Yuman tribes, such as the Yavapai people, the Quechan people, the Mojave people, the Cocopah people, the Paiute people the Havasupai people and the Hualapai people.

    Etymology

    The general belief is that the name of the state comes from an earlier Spanish name, Arizonac, derived from the O’odham name ali ?onak, meaning “small spring”, which initially applied only to an area near the Mexican silver mining camp of Planchas de Plata, Sonora. This is supported by the fact that that area is still known as ali ?onak in the O’odham language. Another possible origin is the Basque phrase haritz ona (“the good oak”).

    Geography

    Arizona is located in the Southwestern United States as one of the Four Corners states. Arizona is the sixth largest state in area, after New Mexico and before Nevada. Of the state’s 113,998 square miles (295,000 km2), approximately 15% is privately owned. The remaining area is public forest and park land, state trust land and Native American reservations.
    Arizona is best known for its desert landscape, which is rich in xerophyte plants such as the cactus. It is also known for its climate, which presents exceptionally hot summers and mild winters. Less well known is the pine-covered high country of the Colorado Plateau in the north-central portion of the state, which contrasts with the desert Basin and Range region in the southern portions of the state.
    Like other states of the Southwest, Arizona has an abundance of topographical characteristics in addition to its desert climate. Mountains and plateaus are found in more than half of the state. Despite the state’s aridity, 27% of Arizona is forest, a percentage comparable to modern-day France or Germany. The largest stand of Ponderosa pine trees in the world is contained in Arizona.
    The Mogollon Rim, a 1,998-foot (609 m) escarpment, cuts across the central section of the state and marks the southwestern edge of the Colorado Plateau, where the state experienced its second worst forest fire ever in 2002.
    Arizona belongs firmly within the Basin and Range region of North America. The region was shaped by prehistoric volcanism, followed by the cooling-off and related subsidence.
    The Grand Canyon is a colorful, steep-sided gorge, carved by the Colorado River, in northern Arizona. The canyon is one of the seven natural wonders of the world and is largely contained in the Grand Canyon National Park-one of the first national parks in the United States. President Theodore Roosevelt was a major proponent of designating the Grand Canyon area, visiting on numerous occasions to hunt mountain lion and enjoy the scenery. The canyon was created by the Colorado River cutting a channel over millions of years, and is about 277 miles (446 km) long, ranges in width from 4 to 18 miles (6 to 29 km) and attains a depth of more than 1 mile (1.6 km). Nearly two billion years of the Earth’s history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut through layer after layer of sediment as the Colorado Plateaus have uplifted.
    Arizona is home to one of the most well-preserved meteorite impact sites in the world. The Barringer Meteorite Crater (better known simply as “Meteor Crater”) is a gigantic hole in the middle of the high plains of the Colorado Plateau, about 25 miles (40 km) west of Winslow. A rim of smashed and jumbled boulders, some of them the size of small houses, rises 150 feet (46 m) above the level of the surrounding plain. The crater itself is nearly 1 mile (1.6 km) wide, and 570 feet (170 m) deep.
    Arizona is one of two states that does not observe Daylight Saving Time (the other being Hawaii), except in the Navajo Nation, located in the northeastern region of the state.

    Earthquakes

    Arizona is at generally low risk of earthquakes, except southwestern Arizona at moderate risk due to its proximity to Southern California. Northern Arizona is at moderate risk due to numerous faults. The areas at lowest risk in the state are near and west of Phoenix.
    The earliest Arizona earthquakes were recorded at Fort Yuma, on the California side of the Colorado River. They were centered near the Imperial Valley, or Mexico, back in the 1800s. The first damaging earthquake known to be centered within Arizona’s borders occurred on January 25, 1906, also including of a series of other earthquakes near Socorro, New Mexico. The shock was violent in Flagstaff. In 1887 Douglas, Az felt the shock of a magnitude 7.2 earthquake with an epicenter 40 miles south in the Mexican state of Sonora. In September 1910, a series of fifty-two earthquakes caused a construction crew near Flagstaff to leave the area. The year Arizona became a state, on August 18, an earthquake caused a 50 mile crack in the San Francisco Range. The state in early January 1935 experienced a series of earthquakes, near the Grand Canyon and the Yuma area. Arizona experienced its largest earthquake in 1959, with a magnitude of 5.6. It was centered near Fredonia, in the northwestern part of the state. It was felt in the neighboring states of Nevada and Utah.
    Earthquake activity is low statewide in general, but a minor to major earthquake can strike any time. On October 8, 2012, a low-risk area in eastern Arizona experienced a minor earthquake.

    Climate

    Due to its large area and variations in elevation, the state has a wide variety of localized climate conditions. In the lower elevations, the climate is primarily desert, with mild winters and extremely hot summers. Typically, from late fall to early spring, the weather is mild, averaging a minimum of 60 °F (16 °C). November through February are the coldest months with temperatures typically ranging from 40-75 °F (4-24 °C), with occasional frosts. About midway through February, the temperatures start to rise again with warm days, and cool breezy nights. The summer months of June through September bring a dry heat ranging from 90-120 °F (32-49 °C), with occasional high temperatures exceeding 125 °F (52 °C) having been observed in the desert area. Arizona’s all time record high is 128 °F (53 °C) recorded at Lake Havasu City on June 29, 1994, and July 5, 2007; the all time record low of -40 °F (-40 °C) was recorded at Hawley Lake on January 7, 1971.
    Due to the primarily dry climate, there are large diurnal temperature variations in less developed areas of the desert. The swings can be as large as 50 °F (28 °C) in the summer months. In the state’s urban centers, the effects of local warming result in much higher measured nighttime lows than in the recent past.
    Arizona has an average annual rainfall of 12.7 inches (323 mm), which comes during two rainy seasons, with cold fronts coming from the Pacific Ocean during the winter and a monsoon in the summer. The monsoon season occurs towards the end of summer. In July or August, the dewpoint rises dramatically for a brief period. During this time, the air contains large amounts of water vapor. Dewpoints as high as 81 °F (27 °C) have been recorded during the Phoenix monsoon season. This hot moisture brings lightning, thunderstorms, wind, and torrential, if usually brief, downpours. These downpours often cause flash floods, which can turn deadly. In an attempt to deter drivers from crossing flooding streams, the Arizona Legislature enacted the Stupid Motorist Law. It is rare for tornadoes or hurricanes to occur in Arizona.
    The northern third of Arizona is a plateau at significantly higher altitudes than the lower desert, and has an appreciably cooler climate, with cold winters and mild summers, though the climate remains semi-arid to arid. Extremely cold temperatures are not unknown; cold air systems from the northern states and Canada occasionally push into the state, bringing temperatures below 0 °F (-18 °C) to the northern parts of the state.
    Indicative of the variation in climate, Arizona is the state which has both the metropolitan area with the most days over 100 °F (38 °C) (Phoenix), and the metropolitan area in the lower 48 states with the most days with a low temperature below freezing (Flagstaff).

    History

    Marcos de Niza, a Spanish Franciscan, explored parts of the area in 1539 and met some of its original native inhabitants, probably the Sobaipuri. The expedition of Spanish explorer Coronado entered the area in 1540-1542 during its search for Cibola. Father Kino was the next European in the region. A member of the Society of Jesus, he led the development of a chain of missions and converted many of the Indians to Christianity in the Pimeria Alta (now southern Arizona and northern Sonora) in the 1690s and early 18th century. Spain founded presidios (“fortified towns”) at Tubac in 1752 and Tucson in 1775. When Mexico achieved its independence from Spain in 1821, what is now Arizona became part of the Territory of Nueva California, also known as Alta California. In the Mexican-American War (1847), the U.S. occupied Mexico City and pursued its claim to much of northern Mexico, including what later became Arizona. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848) specified that the sum of US$15 million in compensation (equivalent to about $403 million in 2012) be paid to the Republic of Mexico. In 1853, the land below the Gila River was acquired from Mexico in the Gadsden Purchase. Arizona was administered as part of the Territory of New Mexico until southern New Mexico seceded from the Union as the Confederate Territory of Arizona on March 16, 1861. Arizona was recognized as a Confederate Territory by presidential proclamation of Jefferson Davis on February 14, 1862. This is the first official use of the name. Arizona supported the Confederate cause with men, horses, and supplies. Formed in 1862 Arizona Scout Companies fought with the Confederate Army throughout the war. Arizona has the farthest recorded Western engagement of the war, the Battle of Picacho Pass. A new Arizona Territory, consisting of the western half of New Mexico Territory was declared in Washington, D.C., on February 24, 1863. The new boundaries would later form the basis of the state.
    Although names, including “Gadsonia”, “Pimeria”, “Montezuma” and “Arizuma” had been considered for the territory, when President Lincoln signed the final bill, it read “Arizona”, and the name became permanent. (Montezuma was not the Aztec Emperor, but the sacred name of a divine hero to the Pima people of the Gila River Valley, and was probably considered-and rejected-for its sentimental value before the name “Arizona” was settled upon.)
    Brigham Young sent Mormons to Arizona in the mid-to-late 19th century. They founded Mesa, Snowflake, Heber, Safford and other towns. They also settled in the Phoenix Valley (or “Valley of the Sun”), Tempe, Prescott, and other areas. The Mormons settled what became northern Arizona and northern New Mexico, but these areas were located in a part of the former New Mexico Territory.
    During the Mexican Revolution from 1910 to 1920, a few battles were fought in the Mexican towns just across the border from Arizonan border settlements. Throughout the revolution, Arizonans were enlisting in one of the several armies fighting in Mexico. The Battle of Ambos Nogales in 1918, other than Pancho Villa’s 1916 Columbus Raid in New Mexico, was the only significant engagement on U.S. soil between American and Mexican forces. The battle resulted in an American victory. After U.S. soldiers were fired on by Mexican federal troops, the American garrison then launched an assault into Nogales, Mexico. The Mexicans eventually surrendered after both sides sustained heavy casualties. A few months earlier, just west of Nogales, an Indian War battle occurred, thus being the last engagement in the American Indian Wars which lasted from 1775 to 1918. The participants in the fight were U.S. soldiers stationed on the border and Yaqui Indians who were using Arizona as a base to raid the nearby Mexican settlements, as part of their wars against Mexico.
    Arizona became a U.S. state on February 14, 1912. This resulted in the end to the territorial colonization of Continental North America. Arizona was the 48th state admitted to the U.S. and the last of the contiguous states to be admitted.
    Cotton farming and copper mining, two of Arizona’s most important statewide industries, suffered heavily during the Great Depression, but it was during the 1920s and 1930s that tourism began to be the important Arizonan industry it is today. Dude ranches, such as the K L Bar and Remuda in Wickenburg, along with the Flying V and Tanque Verde in Tucson, gave tourists the chance to experience the flavor and life of the “old West”. Several upscale hotels and resorts opened during this period, some of which are still top tourist draws to this day; they include the Arizona Biltmore Hotel in central Phoenix (opened 1929) and the Wigwam Resort on the west side of the Phoenix area (opened 1936).
    Arizona was the site of German POW camps during World War II and Japanese-American internment camps. The camps were abolished after World War II. The Phoenix area site was purchased after the war by the Maytag family (of major home appliance fame), and is currently the site of the Phoenix Zoo. A Japanese-American internment camp was located on Mount Lemmon, just outside of the state’s southeastern city of Tucson. Another POW camp was located near the Gila River in eastern Yuma County. Because of wartime fears of Japanese invasion of the west coast, all Japanese-American residents in western Arizona were required to reside in the war camps.
    Arizona was also home to the Phoenix Indian School, one of several federal institutions designed to forcibly assimilate Native American children into Anglo-American culture. Children were often enrolled into these schools against the wishes of their parents and families. Attempts to suppress native identities included forcing the children to cut their hair and take on English names.
    Arizona’s population grew tremendously after World War II, in part because of the development of air conditioning, which made the intense summers more comfortable. According to the Arizona Blue Book (published by the Arizona Secretary of State’s office each year), the state population in 1910 was 294,353. By 1970, it was 1,752,122. The percentage growth each decade averaged about 20% in the earlier decades and about 60% each decade thereafter.
    The 1960s saw the establishment of retirement communities, special age-restricted subdivisions catering exclusively to the needs of senior citizens who wanted to escape the harsh winters of the Midwest and the Northeast. Sun City, established by developer Del Webb and opened in 1960, was one of the first such communities. Green Valley, south of Tucson, was another such community and was designed to be a retirement subdivision for Arizona’s teachers. Many senior citizens arrive in Arizona each winter and stay only during the winter months; they are referred to as snowbirds.
    In March 2000, Arizona was the site of the first legally binding election to nominate a candidate for public office ever held over the internet. In the 2000 Arizona Democratic Primary, under worldwide attention, Al Gore defeated Bill Bradley, and voter turnout increased more than 500% over the 1996 primary.
    Three ships named USS Arizona have been christened in honor of the state, although only USS Arizona (BB-39) was so named after statehood was achieved.

    Economy

    The 2011 total gross state product was $259 billion. This figure gives Arizona a larger economy than such countries as Ireland, Finland, and New Zealand. The composition of the state’s economy is moderately diverse; although health care, transportation and the government remain the largest sectors. The hub of economic output remains in the Phoenix metropolitan area accounting for approximately 74% of the states domestic product.
    The state’s per capita income is $40,828, ranking 39th in the U.S. The state had a median household income of US$50,448, making it 22nd in the country and just below the U.S. national median. Early in its history, Arizona’s economy relied on the “five C’s”: copper (see Copper mining in Arizona), cotton, cattle, citrus, and climate (tourism). At one point, Arizona was the largest producer of cotton in the country. Copper is still extensively mined from many expansive open-pit and underground mines, accounting for two-thirds of the nation’s output.

    Employment

    The state government is Arizona’s largest employer, while Wal-Mart is the state’s largest private employer, with 17,343 employees (2008). As of June 2010, the state’s unemployment rate was 9.6%.
    Nearly 70 percent of the land in Arizona is owned by the U.S. government, which leases a portion of the public domain to ranchers or miners.

    Taxation

    Arizona collects personal income taxes in five brackets: 2.87%, 3.20%, 3.74%, 4.72% and 5.04%. The state transaction privilege tax is 6.6%; however, county and municipal sales taxes generally add an additional 2%.
    The state rate on transient lodging (hotel/motel) is 7.27%. The state of Arizona does not levy a state tax on food for home consumption or on drugs prescribed by a licensed physician or dentist. However, some cities in Arizona, including Phoenix at 2%, do levy a tax on food for home consumption.
    All fifteen Arizona counties levy a tax. Incorporated municipalities also levy transaction privilege taxes which, with the exception of their hotel/motel tax, are generally in the range of 1-to-3%. These added assessments could push the combined sales tax rate to as high as 10.7%.