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Phone Answering Service in Colorado

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    • 1 to 3 days

      Colorado Springs

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

    • 1 to 3 days

      Denver

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • DENVER

  • COLORADO SPRINGS

  • AGATE

  • AGUILAR

  • AKRON

  • ALAMOSA

  • ALLENSPARK

  • ALMA

  • ALMONT

  • AMHERST

  • ANTON

  • ANTONITO

  • ARAPAHOE

  • ARBOLES

  • ARLINGTON

  • ARRIBA

  • ARVADA

  • ASPEN

  • ATWOOD

  • AULT

  • AURORA

  • AUSTIN

  • AVON

  • AVONDALE

  • BAILEY

  • BASALT

  • BATTLEMENT MESA

  • BAYFIELD

  • BEDROCK

  • BELLVUE

  • BENNETT

  • BERTHOUD

  • BETHUNE

  • BEULAH

  • BLACK HAWK

  • BLANCA

  • BONCARBO

  • BOND

  • BOONE

  • BOULDER

  • BRANSON

  • BRECKENRIDGE

  • BRIGGSDALE

  • BRIGHTON

  • BROOMFIELD

  • BRUSH

  • BUENA VISTA

  • BUFFALO CREEK

  • BURLINGTON

  • BURNS

  • BYERS

  • CAHONE

  • CALHAN

  • CAMPO

  • CANON CITY

  • CAPULIN

  • CARBONDALE

  • CARR

  • CASCADE

  • CASTLE ROCK

  • CEDAREDGE

  • CENTER

  • CENTRAL CITY

  • CHAMA

  • CHERAW

  • CHEYENNE WELLS

  • CHIMNEY ROCK

  • CHROMO

  • CIMARRON

  • CLARK

  • CLIFTON

  • CLIMAX

  • COAL CREEK

  • COALDALE

  • COALMONT

  • COLLBRAN

  • COLORADO CITY

  • COMMERCE CITY

  • COMO

  • CONEJOS

  • CONIFER

  • COPE

  • CORTEZ

  • CORY

  • COTOPAXI

  • COWDREY

  • CRAIG

  • CRAWFORD

  • CREEDE

  • CRESTED BUTTE

  • CRESTONE

  • CRIPPLE CREEK

  • CROOK

  • CROWLEY

  • DACONO

  • DE BEQUE

  • DEER TRAIL

  • DEL NORTE

  • DELTA

  • DILLON

  • DINOSAUR

  • DIVIDE

  • DOLORES

  • DOVE CREEK

  • DRAKE

  • DUMONT

  • DUPONT

  • DURANGO

  • EADS

  • EAGLE

  • EASTLAKE

  • EATON

  • ECKERT

  • ECKLEY

  • EDWARDS

  • EGNAR

  • ELBERT

  • ELDORADO SPRINGS

  • ELIZABETH

  • EMPIRE

  • ENGLEWOOD

  • ERIE

  • ESTES PARK

  • EVANS

  • EVERGREEN

  • FAIRPLAY

  • FIRESTONE

  • FLAGLER

  • FLEMING

  • FLORENCE

  • FLORISSANT

  • FORT COLLINS

  • FORT GARLAND

  • FORT LUPTON

  • FORT LYON

  • FORT MORGAN

  • FOUNTAIN

  • FOWLER

  • FRANKTOWN

  • FRASER

  • FREDERICK

  • FRISCO

  • FRUITA

  • GALETON

  • GARDNER

  • GATEWAY

  • GENOA

  • GEORGETOWN

  • GILCREST

  • GILL

  • GLADE PARK

  • GLEN HAVEN

  • GLENWOOD SPRINGS

  • GOLDEN

  • GRANADA

  • GRANBY

  • GRAND JUNCTION

  • GRAND LAKE

  • GRANITE

  • GRANT

  • GREELEY

  • GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS

  • GROVER

  • GUFFEY

  • GUNNISON

  • GYPSUM

  • HAMILTON

  • HARTMAN

  • HARTSEL

  • HASTY

  • HASWELL

  • HAXTUN

  • HAYDEN

  • HENDERSON

  • HEREFORD

  • HESPERUS

  • HILLROSE

  • HILLSIDE

  • HOEHNE

  • HOLLY

  • HOLYOKE

  • HOMELAKE

  • HOOPER

  • HOT SULPHUR SPRINGS

  • HOTCHKISS

  • HOWARD

  • HUDSON

  • HUGO

  • HYGIENE

  • IDAHO SPRINGS

  • IDALIA

  • IDLEDALE

  • IGNACIO

  • ILIFF

  • INDIAN HILLS

  • JAMESTOWN

  • JAROSO

  • JEFFERSON

  • JOES

  • JOHNSTOWN

  • JULESBURG

  • KARVAL

  • KEENESBURG

  • KERSEY

  • KIM

  • KIOWA

  • KIRK

  • KIT CARSON

  • KITTREDGE

  • KREMMLING

  • LA JARA

  • LA JUNTA

  • LA SALLE

  • LA VETA

  • LAFAYETTE

  • LAKE CITY

  • LAKE GEORGE

  • LAMAR

  • LAPORTE

  • LARKSPUR

  • LAS ANIMAS

  • LAZEAR

  • LEADVILLE

  • LEWIS

  • LIMON

  • LINDON

  • LITTLETON

  • LIVERMORE

  • LOG LANE VILLAGE

  • LOMA

  • LONE TREE

  • LONGMONT

  • LOUISVILLE

  • LOUVIERS

  • LOVELAND

  • LUCERNE

  • LYONS

  • MACK

  • MANASSA

  • MANCOS

  • MANITOU SPRINGS

  • MANZANOLA

  • MARVEL

  • MASONVILLE

  • MATHESON

  • MAYBELL

  • MC CLAVE

  • MC COY

  • MEAD

  • MEEKER

  • MEREDITH

  • MERINO

  • MESA

  • MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK

  • MILLIKEN

  • MINTURN

  • MODEL

  • MOFFAT

  • MOLINA

  • MONARCH

  • MONTE VISTA

  • MONTROSE

  • MONUMENT

  • MORRISON

  • MOSCA

  • NATHROP

  • NATURITA

  • NEDERLAND

  • NEW CASTLE

  • NEW RAYMER

  • NIWOT

  • NORWOOD

  • NUCLA

  • NUNN

  • OAK CREEK

  • OHIO CITY

  • OLATHE

  • OLNEY SPRINGS

  • OPHIR

  • ORCHARD

  • ORDWAY

  • OTIS

  • OURAY

  • OVID

  • PADRONI

  • PAGOSA SPRINGS

  • PALISADE

  • PALMER LAKE

  • PAOLI

  • PAONIA

  • PARACHUTE

  • PARADOX

  • PARKER

  • PARLIN

  • PARSHALL

  • PEETZ

  • PENROSE

  • PEYTON

  • PHIPPSBURG

  • PIERCE

  • PINE

  • PINECLIFFE

  • PITKIN

  • PLACERVILLE

  • PLATTEVILLE

  • PLEASANT VIEW

  • PONCHA SPRINGS

  • POWDERHORN

  • PRITCHETT

  • PUEBLO

  • RAMAH

  • RAND

  • RANGELY

  • RED CLIFF

  • RED FEATHER LAKES

  • REDVALE

  • RICO

  • RIDGWAY

  • RIFLE

  • ROCKVALE

  • ROCKY FORD

  • ROGGEN

  • ROLLINSVILLE

  • ROMEO

  • RUSH

  • RYE

  • SAGUACHE

  • SALIDA

  • SAN LUIS

  • SAN PABLO

  • SANFORD

  • SARGENTS

  • SEDALIA

  • SEDGWICK

  • SEIBERT

  • SEVERANCE

  • SHAWNEE

  • SHERIDAN LAKE

  • SILT

  • SILVER PLUME

  • SILVERTHORNE

  • SILVERTON

  • SIMLA

  • SLATER

  • SNOWMASS

  • SNOWMASS VILLAGE

  • SNYDER

  • SOMERSET

  • SOUTH FORK

  • SPRINGFIELD

  • STEAMBOAT SPRINGS

  • STERLING

  • STONEHAM

  • STONINGTON

  • STRASBURG

  • STRATTON

  • SUGAR CITY

  • SWINK

  • TABERNASH

  • TELLURIDE

  • THORNTON

  • TIMNATH

  • TOPONAS

  • TOWAOC

  • TRINCHERA

  • TRINIDAD

  • TWIN LAKES

  • TWO BUTTES

  • USAF ACADEMY

  • VAIL

  • VERNON

  • VICTOR

  • VILAS

  • VILLA GROVE

  • VONA

  • WALDEN

  • WALSENBURG

  • WALSH

  • WARD

  • WATKINS

  • WELDONA

  • WELLINGTON

  • WESTCLIFFE

  • WESTMINSTER

  • WESTON

  • WETMORE

  • WHEAT RIDGE

  • WHITEWATER

  • WIGGINS

  • WILD HORSE

  • WILEY

  • WINDSOR

  • WINTER PARK

  • WOLCOTT

  • WOODLAND PARK

  • WOODROW

  • WOODY CREEK

  • WRAY

  • YAMPA

  • YELLOW JACKET

  • YODER

  • YUMA
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in Colorado?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in Colorado. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in Colorado?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in Colorado. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in Colorado?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in Colorado. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of Colorado

    Colorado is a U.S. state that encompasses most of the Southern Rocky Mountains as well as the northeastern portion of the Colorado Plateau and the western edge of the Great Plains. Colorado is part of the Western United States, the Southwestern United States, and the Mountain States. Colorado is the 8th most extensive and the 22nd most populous of the 50 United States. The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Colorado was 5,187,582 on July 1, 2012, an increase of +3.15% since the 2010 United States Census.
    The state was named for the Colorado River, which early Spanish explorers named the Rio Colorado for the red colored (Spanish: colorado) silt the river carried from the mountains. On August 1, 1876, U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant signed a proclamation admitting Colorado as the 38th state. Colorado is nicknamed the “Centennial State” because it was admitted to the Union in 1876, the centennial year of the United States Declaration of Independence.
    Colorado is bordered by the northwest state of Wyoming to the north, the midwest states of Nebraska and Kansas to the northeast and east, on the south by New Mexico and a small portion of the southwestern state of Oklahoma, on the west by Utah, and Arizona to the southwest. The four states of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah meet at one common point known as the Four Corners, which is known as the heart of the American Southwest. Colorado is noted for its vivid landscape of mountains, forests, high plains, mesas, canyons, plateaus, rivers, and desert lands.
    Denver is the capital and the most populous city of Colorado. Residents of the state are properly known as “Coloradans”, although the term “Coloradoan” is still used.

    Geography

    The borders of Colorado were originally defined to be lines of latitude and longitude, making its shape a latitude-longitude* quadrangle which stretches from 37°N to 41°N latitude and from 102°03’W to 109°03’W longitude (25°W to 32°W from the Washington Meridian). Colorado, Wyoming and Utah are the only states which have boundaries defined solely by lines of latitude and longitude. When placing the border markers for the Territory of Colorado, minor surveying errors resulted in several small kinks, most notably along the border with the Territory of Utah. Once agreed upon by the federal, state, and territorial governments, those surveyors’ benchmarks became the legal boundaries for the Colorado Territory, kinks and all.

    Mountains

    The summit of Mount Elbert at 14,440 feet (4,401 m) in elevation in Lake County is the highest point of Colorado and the Rocky Mountains. Colorado is the only U.S. state that lies entirely above 1,000 meters (3,281 ft) elevation. The point where the Arikaree River flows out of Yuma County, Colorado, and into Cheyenne County, Kansas, is the lowest point in Colorado at 3,317 feet (1,011 m) elevation. This point, which holds the distinction of being the highest low elevation point of any state, is higher than the high elevation points of 18 states and the District of Columbia.

    Plains

    A little over one third of the area of Colorado is flat and rolling land. East of the Rocky Mountains are the Colorado Eastern Plains of the High Plains, the section of the Great Plains within Colorado at elevations ranging from roughly 3,350 to 7,500 feet (1,020 to 2,300 m). The Colorado plains are usually thought of as prairies, but actually they have many patches of deciduous forests, buttes, and canyons, much like the high plains in New Mexico as well. Eastern Colorado is presently mainly covered in farmland, along with small farming villages and towns. Precipitation is fair, averaging from 15 to 25 inches (380 to 640 mm) annually.
    Corn, wheat, hay, soybeans, and oats are all typical crops, and most of the villages and towns in this region boast both a water tower and a grain elevator. As well as the farming of crops, Eastern Colorado has a good deal of livestock raising, such as at cattle ranches and hog farms and irrigation water is available from the South Platte, the Arkansas River, and a few other streams, and also from subterranean sources, including artesian wells. However, heavy use of ground water from wells for irrigation has caused underground water reserves to decline.

    Front range

    Most of Colorado’s population resides along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains in the Front Range Urban Corridor between Cheyenne, Wyoming, and Pueblo, Colorado. This region is partially protected from prevailing storms that blow in from the Pacific Ocean region by the high Rockies in the middle of Colorado. The only other significant population centers are at Grand Junction and Durango in western and southwestern Colorado.

    Continental Divide

    The Continental Divide extends along the crest of the Rocky Mountains. The area of Colorado to the west of the Continental Divide is called the Western Slope of Colorado. Drainage water west of the Continental Divide flows to the southwest via the Colorado River and the Green River into the Gulf of California.
    Within the interior of the Rocky Mountains are several large so-called “parks” or high broad basins. In the north, on the east side of the Continental Divide is the North Park of Colorado. The North Park is drained by the North Platte River, which flows north into Wyoming and Nebraska. Just to the south of North Park, but on the western side of the Continental Divide, is the Middle Park of Colorado, which is drained by the Colorado River. The South Park of Colorado is the region of the headwaters of the South Platte River.

    Southern region

    In southmost Colorado is the large San Luis Valley, where the headwaters of the Rio Grande are located. The valley sits between the Sangre De Cristo Mountains and San Juan Mountains, and consists of large desert lands that eventually run into the mountains. The Rio Grande drains due south into New Mexico, Mexico, and Texas. Across the Sangre de Cristo Range to the east of the San Luis Valley lies the Wet Mountain Valley. These basins, particularly the San Luis Valley, lie along the Rio Grande Rift, a major geological formation of the Rocky Mountains, and its branches.

    Peaks

    To the west of Great Plains of Colorado rises the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains. Notable peaks of the Rocky Mountains include Longs Peak, Mount Evans, Pikes Peak, and the Spanish Peaks near Walsenburg, in southern Colorado. This area drains to the east and the southeast, ultimately either via the Mississippi River or the Rio Grande into the Gulf of Mexico.
    The Rocky Mountains within Colorado contain about 54 peaks that are 14,000 feet (4,267 m) or higher in elevation above sea level, known as fourteeners. These mountains are largely covered with trees such as conifers and aspens up to the tree line, at an elevation of about 12,140 feet (3,700 m) in southern Colorado to about 10,500 feet (3,200 m) in northern Colorado. Above this only alpine vegetation grows. Only small parts of the Colorado Rockies are snow-covered year round.
    Much of the alpine snow melts by mid-August with the exception of a few snowcapped peaks and a few small glaciers. The Colorado Mineral Belt, stretching from the San Juan Mountains in the southwest to Boulder and Central City on the front range, contains most of the historic gold- and silver-mining districts of Colorado. Mount Elbert is the highest summit of the Rocky Mountains. The 30 highest major summits of the Rocky Mountains of North America all lie within the state.

    Colorado Western Slope

    The Western Slope of Colorado is drained by the Colorado River and its tributaries (primarily the Green River and the San Juan River), or by evaporation in its arid areas. Prominent in the southwestern area of the Western Slope is the Grand Mesa and the high San Juan Mountains, a rugged mountain range, and to the west of the San Juan Mountains, the Colorado Plateau, a high arid region that borders Southern Utah. The Colorado River flows through Glenwood Canyon and then through an arid valley made up of desert from Rifle to Parachute, through the desert canyon of De Beque Canyon, and into the arid desert of Grand Valley, of which the city of Grand Junction is located.
    The city of Grand Junction, Colorado, is the largest city on the Western Slope, Grand Junction and Durango are the only major centers of radio and television broadcasting, newspapers, and higher education on the Western Slope. Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction, Western State College of Colorado in Gunnison, and Fort Lewis College in Durango are the only four-year colleges in Colorado west of the Continental Divide.
    Grand Junction is located along Interstate 70, the only major highway of Western Colorado. Grand Junction is also along the major railroad of the Western Slope, the Union Pacific, which also provides the tracks for Amtrak’s California Zephyr passenger train, which crosses the Rocky Mountains between Denver and Grand Junction via a route on which there are no continuous highways.
    To the southeast of Grand Junction is the Grand Mesa, said to be the world’s largest flat-topped mountain. Other towns of the Western Slope include Glenwood Springs with its resort hot springs, and the ski resorts of Aspen, Breckenridge, Vail, Crested Butte, Steamboat Springs, and Telluride.
    The northwestern corner of Colorado is a sparsely populated region, and it contains part of the noted Dinosaur National Monument, which is not only a paleontological area, but is also a scenic area of rocky hills, canyons, arid desert, and streambeads. Here, the Green River briefly crosses over into Colorado.
    From west to east, the land of Colorado consists of desert lands, desert plateaus, alpine mountains, National Forests, relatively flat grasslands, scattered forests, buttes, and canyons in the western edge of the Great Plains. The famous Pikes Peak is located just west of Colorado Springs. Its isolated peak is visible from nearly the Kansas border on clear days, and also far to the north and the south.
    The desert lands in Colorado are located in and around areas such as, the Pueblo, Canon City, Florence, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, San Luis Valley, Cortez, Canyon of the Ancients National Monument, Hovenweep National Monument, Ute Mountain, Delta, Grand Junction, Colorado National Monument, and other areas surrounding the Uncompahgre Plateau and Uncompahgre National Forest.
    Colorado is one of four states in the United States that share a common geographic point the Four Corners together with Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. At this intersection, it is possible to stand in four states at once.

    Climate

    The climate of Colorado is more complex than states outside of the Mountain States region. Unlike most other states, southern Colorado is not always warmer than northern Colorado. Most of Colorado is made up of mountains, foothills, high plains, and desert lands. Mountains and surrounding valleys greatly affect local climate.
    As a general rule, with an increase in elevation comes a decrease in temperature and an increase in precipitation. Northeast, east, and southeast Colorado are mostly the high plains, while Northern Colorado is a mix of high plains, foothills, and mountains. Northwest and west Colorado are predominantly mountainous, with some desert lands mixed in. Southwest and southern Colorado are a complex mixture of desert and mountain areas.

    Eastern Plains

    The climate of the Eastern Plains is semi-arid (Koppen climate classification BSk) with low humidity and moderate precipitation, usually from 15 to 25 inches (380 to 640 mm) annually. The area is known for its abundant sunshine and cool clear nights, which give this area a great average diurnal temperature range. The difference between the highs of the day and the cool of nights can be considerable as warmth dissipates to the space during clear nights, the heat radiation not being trapped by clouds. Denver has one of the highest number of annual sunshine hours and clear days of major cities in the United States, the sunshine hours being compareable to Miami, Florida. The climate of Colorado is well suited for the utilization of evaporative coolers and solar hot water.
    In summer, this area can have many days above 95 °F (35 °C) and often 100 °F (38 °C). On the plains, the winter lows usually range from 25 °F (-3.5 °C) to -10 °F (-23 °C). About 75% of the precipitation falls within the growing season, from April to September, but this area is very prone to droughts. Most of the precipitation comes from thunderstorms, which can be severe, and from major snowstorms that occur in the winter, and early spring. Otherwise, winters tend to be mostly dry and cold.
    In much of the region, March is the snowiest month. April and May are normally the rainiest months, while April is the wettest month overall. The Front Range cities closer to the mountains tend to be warmer in the winter due to chinook winds which warm the area, sometimes bringing temperatures of 70 °F (21 °C) or higher in the winter. The average July temperature is 55 °F (13 °C) in the morning and 90 °F (32 °C) in the afternoon. The average January temperature is 18 °F (-8 °C) in the morning and 48 °F (9 °C) in the afternoon, although variation between consecutive days can be 40 °F (22 °C).

    West of the plains and foothills

    West of the plains and foothills, the weather of Colorado is much less uniform. Even places a few miles apart can experience entirely different weather depending on the topography of the area. Most valleys have a semi-arid climate, which becomes an alpine climate at higher elevations. Humid microclimates also exist in some areas. Generally, the wettest season in western Colorado is winter while June is the driest month.
    The mountains have mild summers with many days of high temperatures between 60 °F (16 °C) and 85 °F (29 °C), although thunderstorms can cause sudden but brief drops in temperature. The winters bring abundant, powdery snowfall to the mountains with plenty of sunshine in between major storms. The western slope has high summer temperatures similar to those found on the plains, while the winters tend to be slightly cooler due to the lack of warming winds common to the plains and Front Range. Other areas in the west have their own unique climate.

    Extreme weather

    Extreme weather changes are common in Colorado, although the majority of extreme weather occurs in the least populated areas of the state. Thunderstorms are common east of the Continental divide in the spring and summer yet usually brief. Hail is a common sight in the mountains east of the divide and in the northwest part of the state. The Eastern Plains have had some of the biggest hail storms in North America.
    The Eastern Plains are part of the extreme western portion of Tornado Alley, some damaging tornadoes in the Eastern Plains include the 1990 Limon F3 tornado and the 2008 Windsor EF3 tornado, which devastated the town. The plains are also susceptible to occasional floods, which are caused both by thunderstorms and by the rapid melting of snow in the mountains during warm weather. Denver’s record in 1901 for the number of consecutive days above 90 °F (32 °C) was broken during the summer of 2008. The new record of 24 consecutive days surpassed the previous record by almost a week.
    Much of Colorado is a very dry state averaging only 17 inches (430 mm) of precipitation per year statewide and rarely experiences a time when some portion of the state is not in some degree of drought. The lack of precipitation contributes to the severity of wildfires in the state such as the Hayman Fire, one of the largest wildfires in American history, and the Fourmile Canyon Fire of 2010, which until the Waldo Canyon Fire of June 2012 was the most destructive wildfire in Colorado’s recorded history.
    However, there are some of the mountainous regions of Colorado which receive a huge amount of moisture via winter snowfalls. The spring melts of these snows often cause great waterflows in such rivers as the Yampa River, the Grand River, the Colorado River, the Rio Grande, the Arkansas River, Cherry Creek, the North Platte River, and the South Platte River.

    The Yampa River, from a high overlook.
    Water flowing out of the Colorado Rocky Mountains is a very significant source of water for the farms, towns, and cities of fellow southwest states of New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, as well as midwest like Nebraska and Kansas, and also southern states like Oklahoma and Texas. A significant amount of water is also diverted for use in California; occasionally (formerly naturally and consistently) the flow of water reaches northern Mexico.

    Earthquakes

    Despite its mountainous terrain, Colorado is relatively quiescent seismically. The U.S. National Earthquake Information Center is located in Golden.
    On August 22, 2011, a 5.3 magnitude earthquake occurred nine miles WSW of the city of Trinidad. No casualties and only small damage was reported. It was the second largest earthquake in Colorado. A magnitude 5.7 earthquake was recorded in 1973.

    History

    The region that is today the state of Colorado has been inhabited by Native Americans for more than 13,000 years. The Lindenmeier Site in Larimer County contains artifacts dating from approximately 11200 BC to 3000 BC. The eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains was a major migration route that was important to the spread of early peoples throughout the Americas. The Ancient Pueblo Peoples lived in the valleys and mesas of the Colorado Plateau. The Ute Nation inhabited the mountain valleys of the Southern Rocky Mountains and the Western Rocky Mountains, even as far east as the Front Range of present day. The Apache and the Comanche also inhabited the Eastern and Southeastern portions of the state as well. The Arapaho Nation and the Cheyenne Nation moved west to hunt across the High Plains at times as well.
    The United States acquired a territorial claim to the eastern flank of the Rocky Mountains with the Louisiana Purchase from France in 1803. This U.S. claim conflicted with the claim of Spain to the upper Arkansas River Basin as the exclusive trading zone of its colony of Santa Fe de Nuevo Mejico. Zebulon Pike led a U.S. Army reconnaissance expedition into the disputed region in 1806. Colonel Pike and his men were arrested by Spanish cavalrymen in the San Luis Valley the following February, taken to Chihuahua, and then expelled from Mexico the following July.
    The United States relinquished its claim to all land south and west of the Arkansas River and south of 42nd parallel north and west of the 100th meridian west as part of its purchase of Florida from Spain with the Adams-Onis Treaty of 1819. The treaty took effect February 22, 1821. Having settled its border with Spain, the United States admitted the southeastern portion of the Territory of Missouri to the Union as the state of Missouri on August 10, 1821. The remainder of the Missouri Territory, including what would become northeastern Colorado, became unorganized territory, and would remain so for 33 years over the question of slavery. After 11 years of war, Spain finally recognized the independence of Mexico with the Treaty of Cordoba signed on August 24, 1821. Mexico eventually ratified the Adams-Onis Treaty in 1831. The Texian Revolt of 1835-1836 fomented a dispute between the United States and Mexico which eventually erupted into the Mexican-American War in 1846. Mexico surrendered its northern territory to the United States with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo at the conclusion of the war in 1848.
    Most American settlers traveling overland west to the Oregon Country, the new goldfields of California, or the new Mormon settlements of Deseret in the Salt Lake Valley, avoided the rugged Southern Rocky Mountains, and instead followed the North Platte River and Sweetwater River to South Pass, the lowest crossing of the Continental Divide between the Southern Rocky Mountains and the Central Rocky Mountains. In 1849, the Mormons of the Salt Lake Valley organized the extralegal State of Deseret, claiming the entire Great Basin and all lands drained by the Green, Grand, and Colorado rivers. The federal government of the United States flatly refused to recognize the new Mormon government, because it was theocratic and sanctioned plural marriage. Instead, the Compromise of 1850 divided the Mexican Cession and the northwestern claims of Texas into a new state and two new territories, the state of California, the Territory of New Mexico, and the Territory of Utah. On April 9, 1851, Mexican American settlers from the area of Taos settled the village of San Luis, then in the New Mexico Territory, later to become Colorado’s first permanent Euro-American settlement.
    In 1854, Senator Stephen A. Douglas persuaded the U.S. Congress to divide the unorganized territory east of the Continental Divide into two new organized territories, the Territory of Kansas and the Territory of Nebraska, and an unorganized southern region known as the Indian territory. Each new territory was to decide the fate of slavery within its boundaries, but this compromise merely served to fuel animosity between free soil and pro-slavery factions.
    The gold seekers organized the Provisional Government of the Territory of Jefferson on August 24, 1859, but this new territory failed to secure approval from the Congress of the United States embroiled in the debate over slavery. The election of Abraham Lincoln for the President of the United States on November 6, 1860, led to the secession of nine southern slave states and the threat of civil war among the states. Seeking to augment the political power of the Union states, the Republican Party dominated Congress quickly admitted the eastern portion of the Territory of Kansas into the Union as the free State of Kansas on January 29, 1861, leaving the western portion of the Kansas Territory, and its gold-mining areas, as unorganized territory.

    Territory act

    Thirty days later on February 28, 1861, outgoing U.S. President James Buchanan signed an Act of Congress organizing the free Territory of Colorado. The original boundaries of Colorado remain unchanged today. The name Colorado was chosen because it was commonly believed that the Colorado River originated in the territory. In 1776, Spanish priest Silvestre Velez de Escalante recorded that Native Americans in the area knew the river as el Rio Colorado for the red-brown silt that the river carried from the mountains. In 1859, a U.S. Army topographic expedition led by Captain John Macomb located the confluence of the Green River with the Grand River in what is now Canyonlands National Park in Utah. The Macomb party designated the confluence as the source of the Colorado River.
    On April 12, 1861, South Carolina artillery opened fire on Fort Sumter to start the American Civil War. While many gold seekers held sympathies for the Confederacy, the vast majority remained fiercely loyal to the Union cause.
    In 1862, a force of Texas cavalry invaded the Territory of New Mexico and captured Santa Fe on March 10. The object of this Western Campaign was to seize or disrupt the gold fields of Colorado and California and to seize ports on the Pacific Ocean for the Confederacy. A hastily organized force of Colorado volunteers force-marched from Denver City, Colorado Territory, to Glorieta Pass, New Mexico Territory, in an attempt to block the Texans. On March 28, the Coloradans and local New Mexico volunteers stopped the Texans at the Battle of Glorieta Pass, destroyed their cannon and supply wagons, and ran off 500 head of their horses and mules. The Texans were forced to retreat to Santa Fe. Having lost the supplies for their campaign and finding little support in New Mexico, the Texans abandoned Santa Fe and returned to San Antonio in defeat. The Confederacy made no further attempts to seize the Southwestern United States.
    In 1864, Territorial Governor John Evans appointed the Reverend John Chivington as Colonel of the Colorado Volunteers with orders to protect white settlers from Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors who were accused of stealing cattle. Colonel Chivington ordered his men to attack a band of Cheyenne and Arapaho encamped along Sand Creek. Chivington reported that his troops killed more than 500 warriors. The militia returned to Denver City in triumph, but several officers reported that the so-called battle was a blatant massacre of Indians at peace, that most of the dead were women and children, and that bodies of the dead had been mutilated and desecrated in hideous manner. Three U.S. Army inquiries condemned the action, and incoming President Andrew Johnson asked Governor Evans for his resignation, but none of the perpetrators was ever punished.
    In the midst and aftermath of Civil War, many discouraged prospectors returned to their homes, but a determined few stayed on to develop mines, mills, farms, ranches, roads, and towns in the Territory. On September 14, 1864, James Huff discovered silver near Argentine Pass, the first of many silver strikes. In 1867, the Union Pacific Railroad laid its tracks west to Weir, now Julesburg, in the northeast corner of the Territory. The Union Pacific linked up with the Central Pacific Railroad at Promontory Summit, Utah, on May 10, 1869, to form the First Transcontinental Railroad. The Denver Pacific Railway reached Denver in June of the following year, and the Kansas Pacific arrived two months later to forge the second line across the continent. In 1872, rich veins of silver were discovered in the San Juan Mountains on the Ute Indian reservation in southwestern Colorado. The Ute people were removed from the San Juans the following year.

    Statehood

    The United States Congress passed an enabling act on March 3, 1875, specifying the requirements for the Territory of Colorado to become a state. On August 1, 1876 (28 days after the Centennial of the United States), U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant signed a proclamation admitting Colorado to the Union as the 38th state and earning it the moniker “Centennial State”.
    The discovery of a major silver lode near Leadville in 1878, triggered the Colorado Silver Boom. The Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890 invigorated silver mining, and Colorado’s last, but greatest, gold strike at Cripple Creek a few months later lured a new generation of gold seekers. Colorado women were granted the right to vote beginning on November 7, 1893, making Colorado the second state to grant universal suffrage and the first one by a popular vote (of Colorado men). The repeal of the Sherman Silver Purchase Act in 1893 led to a staggering collapse of the mining and agricultural economy of Colorado, but the state slowly and steadily recovered.
    Colorado became the first western state to host a major political convention when the Democratic Party met in Denver in 1908. By the U.S. Census in 1930, the population of Colorado first exceeded one million residents. Colorado suffered greatly through the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, but a major wave of immigration following World War II boosted Colorado’s fortune. Tourism became a mainstay of the state economy, and high technology became an important economic engine. The United States Census Bureau estimated that the population of Colorado exceeded five million in 2009.
    Colorado became one of the first states to legalize Marijuana in 2012 with the passing of Amendment 64.
    Three warships of the U.S. Navy have been named the USS Colorado. The first USS Colorado was named for the Colorado River. The later two ships were named in honor of the state, including the battleship USS Colorado which served in World War II in the Pacific beginning in 1941. At the time of the Attack on Pearl Harbor, this USS Colorado was located at the naval base in San Diego, Calif. and hence went unscathed.

    Economy

    CNBC’s list of “Top States for Business for 2010” has recognized Colorado as the third best state in the nation, falling short to only Texas and Virginia.
    The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that the total state product in 2010 was $257.6 billion. Per capita personal income in 2010 was $51 940, ranking Colorado 11th in the nation. The state’s economy broadened from its mid-19th century roots in mining when irrigated agriculture developed, and by the late 19th century, raising livestock had become important. Early industry was based on the extraction and processing of minerals and agricultural products. Current agricultural products are cattle, wheat, dairy products, corn, and hay.
    The federal government is also a major economic force in the state with many important federal facilities including NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command, United States Air Force Academy, Schriever Air Force Base located approximately 10 miles (16 kilometers) east of Peterson Air Force Base, and Fort Carson, both located in Colorado Springs within El Paso County; NOAA, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder; U.S. Geological Survey and other government agencies at the Denver Federal Center near Lakewood; the Denver Mint, Buckley Air Force Base, and 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver; and a federal Supermax Prison and other federal prisons near Canon City. In addition to these and other federal agencies, Colorado has abundant National Forest land and four National Parks that contribute to federal ownership of 24,615,788 acres (99,617 km2) of land in Colorado, or 37% of the total area of the state. In the second half of the 20th century, the industrial and service sectors have expanded greatly. The state’s economy is diversified and is notable for its concentration of scientific research and high-technology industries. Other industries include food processing, transportation equipment, machinery, chemical products, the extraction of metals such as gold (see Gold mining in Colorado), silver, and molybdenum. Colorado now also has the largest annual production of beer of any state. Denver is an important financial center.
    A number of nationally known brand names have originated in Colorado factories and laboratories. From Denver came the forerunner of telecommunications giant Qwest in 1879, Samsonite luggage in 1910, Gates belts and hoses in 1911, and Russell Stover Candies in 1923. Kuner canned vegetables began in Brighton in 1864. From Golden came Coors beer in 1873, CoorsTek industrial ceramics in 1920, and Jolly Rancher candy in 1949. CF&I railroad rails, wire, nails and pipe debuted in Pueblo in 1892. Holly Sugar was first milled from beets in Holly in 1905, and later moved its headquarters to Colorado Springs. The present-day Swift packed meat of Greeley evolved from Monfort of Colorado, Inc., established in 1930. Estes model rockets were launched in Penrose in 1958. Fort Collins has been the home of Woodward Governor Company’s motor controllers (governors) since 1870, and Waterpik dental water jets and showerheads since 1962. Celestial Seasonings herbal teas have been made in Boulder since 1969. Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory made its first candy in Durango in 1981.
    Colorado has a flat 4.63% income tax, regardless of income level. Unlike most states, which calculate taxes based on federal adjusted gross income, Colorado taxes are based on taxable income – income after federal exemptions and federal itemized (or standard) deductions. Colorado’s state sales tax is 2.9% on retail sales. When state revenues exceed state constitutional limits, full-year Colorado residents can claim a sales tax refund on their individual state income tax return. Many counties and cities charge their own rates in addition to the base state rate. There are also certain county and special district taxes that may apply.
    Real estate and personal business property are taxable in Colorado. The state’s senior property tax exemption was temporarily suspended by the Colorado Legislature in 2003. The tax break is scheduled to return for assessment year 2006, payable in 2007.
    As of September 2012, the state’s unemployment rate is 7.9%.

    Philanthropy

    Major philanthropic organizations based in Colorado, including the Daniels Fund, the Anschutz Family Foundation, the Gates Family Foundation, the El Pomar Foundation and the Boettcher Foundation, grant approximately $400 million each year from approximately $7 billion of assets.

    Natural resources

    Colorado has significant hydrocarbon resources. According to the Energy Information Administration, Colorado hosts seven of the Nation’s 100 largest natural gas fields and two of its 100 largest oil fields. Conventional and unconventional natural gas output from several Colorado basins typically account for more than 5 percent of annual U.S. natural gas production. Colorado’s oil shale deposits hold an estimated 1 trillion barrels (160 km3) of oil – nearly as much oil as the entire world’s proven oil reserves; the economic viability of the oil shale, however, has not been demonstrated. Substantial deposits of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coal are found in the state. Kimberlite volcanic pipes have been found in Colorado; the Kelsey Lake Diamond Mine operated for several years, recovering gem quality diamonds.
    Colorado’s high Rocky Mountain ridges and eastern plains offer wind power potential, and geologic activity in the mountain areas provides potential for geothermal power development. Much of the state is sunny and could produce solar power. Major rivers flowing from the Rocky Mountains offer hydroelectric power resources. Corn grown in the flat eastern part of the state offers potential resources for ethanol production.

    Transportation

    Colorado transportation system connects its cities, residents, and visitors through diverse and well regulated modes.
    Colorado’s primary method of transportation is its highway system. Interstate 25 is the primary North/South highway in the state, connecting Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo, and Fort Collins, and Interstate 70 is the primary East/West route connecting Denver with the mountain communities and Grand Junction. The state is home to a network of US highways and state highways that provide access to much of the state, while smaller communities are only accessible through county roads.
    Denver International Airport (DIA) is the sixteenth busiest airport in the world and handles the bulk of non-military or commercial air traffic in and out of Colorado. Regional airports are located throughout Colorado.
    AMTRAK operates two rail passenger lines through Colorado and the Regional Transportation District operates a light rail transit system in the Denver Metropolitan Area. Rail transport is important for energy, agriculture, and industrial use. Public transportation services offer both intra-city and inter-city bus services.