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Phone Answering Service in Montana

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    • 1 to 3 days

      Billings

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • BILLINGS

  • ABSAROKEE

  • NYE

  • ALBERTON

  • ALDER

  • ALZADA

  • ANACONDA

  • ANGELA

  • ANTELOPE

  • ARLEE

  • RAVALLI

  • ASHLAND

  • AUGUSTA

  • AVON

  • BABB

  • BAINVILLE

  • BAKER

  • WILLARD

  • BALLANTINE

  • BASIN

  • BEARCREEK

  • BELFRY

  • BELGRADE

  • BELT

  • BIDDLE

  • BIG ARM

  • BIGFORK

  • BIGHORN

  • BIG SANDY

  • BIG TIMBER

  • BIRNEY

  • BLOOMFIELD

  • BONNER

  • BOULDER

  • BOX ELDER

  • BOYES

  • BOZEMAN

  • BIG SKY

  • BOZEMAN

  • BRADY

  • BRIDGER

  • BROADUS

  • POWDERVILLE

  • BROADVIEW

  • BROCKTON

  • BROCKWAY

  • BROWNING

  • BRUSETT

  • BUFFALO

  • BUSBY

  • BUTTE

  • BYNUM

  • CAMERON

  • CARDWELL

  • CARTER

  • FLOWEREE

  • CASCADE

  • CHARLO

  • CHESTER

  • CHINOOK

  • LLOYD

  • CHOTEAU

  • CIRCLE

  • CLANCY

  • CLINTON

  • CLYDE PARK

  • COFFEE CREEK

  • COHAGEN

  • COLSTRIP

  • COLUMBIA FALLS

  • CORAM

  • HUNGRY HORSE

  • MARTIN CITY

  • POLEBRIDGE

  • COLUMBUS

  • CONDON

  • CONNER

  • CONRAD

  • LEDGER

  • COOKE CITY

  • SILVER GATE

  • CORVALLIS

  • CRANE

  • CROW AGENCY

  • CULBERTSON

  • CUSTER

  • CUT BANK

  • DAGMAR

  • DARBY

  • DAYTON

  • PROCTOR

  • DECKER

  • DEER LODGE

  • GARRISON

  • GOLD CREEK

  • DENTON

  • DELL

  • DILLON

  • GLEN

  • POLARIS

  • DIVIDE

  • DIXON

  • DODSON

  • DRUMMOND

  • DUPUYER

  • DUTTON

  • EAST GLACIER PARK

  • EAST HELENA

  • WINSTON

  • EDGAR

  • EKALAKA

  • ELLISTON

  • ELMO

  • EMIGRANT

  • ENNIS

  • ETHRIDGE

  • EUREKA

  • FAIRFIELD

  • FAIRVIEW

  • FALLON

  • MILDRED

  • FISHTAIL

  • FLAXVILLE

  • FLORENCE

  • FORSYTH

  • FORT BENTON

  • FORT HARRISON

  • FORTINE

  • FORT PECK

  • FORT SHAW

  • FRAZER

  • FRENCHTOWN

  • HUSON

  • FROID

  • HOMESTEAD

  • FROMBERG

  • GALATA

  • GALLATIN GATEWAY

  • GARDINER

  • GARRYOWEN

  • GERALDINE

  • GEYSER

  • GILDFORD

  • GLASGOW

  • SAINT MARIE

  • GLENDIVE

  • GRASS RANGE

  • TEIGEN

  • GREAT FALLS

  • MALMSTROM A F B

  • GREAT FALLS

  • BLACK EAGLE

  • GREYCLIFF

  • HALL

  • GRANTSDALE

  • HAMILTON

  • PINESDALE

  • HAMMOND

  • HARDIN

  • FORT SMITH

  • HARLEM

  • HARLOWTON

  • HARRISON

  • HAVRE

  • HAYS

  • HEART BUTTE

  • HELENA

  • CANYON CREEK

  • HELMVILLE

  • HERON

  • HIGHWOOD

  • HILGER

  • HINGHAM

  • HINSDALE

  • HOBSON

  • HOGELAND

  • HOT SPRINGS

  • LONEPINE

  • HUNTLEY

  • HYSHAM

  • SANDERS

  • INGOMAR

  • INVERNESS

  • ISMAY

  • JACKSON

  • JEFFERSON CITY

  • JOLIET

  • JOPLIN

  • JORDAN

  • JUDITH GAP

  • KALISPELL

  • KEVIN

  • OILMONT

  • KILA

  • KINSEY

  • KREMLIN

  • LAKESIDE

  • ROLLINS

  • LAMBERT

  • LAME DEER

  • LARSLAN

  • LAUREL

  • LAVINA

  • FOREST GROVE

  • LEWISTOWN

  • LIBBY

  • LIMA

  • LINCOLN

  • LINDSAY

  • LIVINGSTON

  • SPRINGDALE

  • LODGE GRASS

  • LOLO

  • LOMA

  • LORING

  • MC ALLISTER

  • MC LEOD

  • MALTA

  • MANHATTAN

  • MARION

  • MARTINSDALE

  • MARYSVILLE

  • MEDICINE LAKE

  • MELROSE

  • MELSTONE

  • MELVILLE

  • MILES CITY

  • HATHAWAY

  • OLIVE

  • MILLTOWN

  • MISSOULA

  • MOCCASIN

  • ACTON

  • MOLT

  • MONARCH

  • MOORE

  • MUSSELSHELL

  • NASHUA

  • NEIHART

  • NORRIS

  • NOXON

  • OLNEY

  • OPHEIM

  • OTTER

  • OUTLOOK

  • OVANDO

  • PABLO

  • PARADISE

  • PARK CITY

  • PEERLESS

  • PENDROY

  • PHILIPSBURG

  • PLAINS

  • PLENTYWOOD

  • PLEVNA

  • POLSON

  • POMPEYS PILLAR

  • PONY

  • POPLAR

  • POWER

  • PRAY

  • PRYOR

  • RAMSAY

  • RAPELJE

  • RAYMOND

  • RAYNESFORD

  • RED LODGE

  • REDSTONE

  • REED POINT

  • RESERVE

  • REXFORD

  • RICHEY

  • GLENTANA

  • RICHLAND

  • RINGLING

  • BOYD

  • ROBERTS

  • RONAN

  • ROSCOE

  • ROSEBUD

  • ROUNDUP

  • ROY

  • RUDYARD

  • RYEGATE

  • SACO

  • SAINT IGNATIUS

  • DE BORGIA

  • HAUGAN

  • SAINT REGIS

  • SALTESE

  • SAINT XAVIER

  • SAND COULEE

  • SAND SPRINGS

  • SAVAGE

  • SCOBEY

  • SEELEY LAKE

  • SHAWMUT

  • LOTHAIR

  • SHELBY

  • SHEPHERD

  • SHERIDAN

  • SIDNEY

  • SIMMS

  • SOMERS

  • STANFORD

  • STEVENSVILLE

  • STOCKETT

  • STRYKER

  • SULA

  • SUMATRA

  • SUNBURST

  • SUN RIVER

  • SUPERIOR

  • SWEET GRASS

  • TERRY

  • THOMPSON FALLS

  • THREE FORKS

  • RADERSBURG

  • TOSTON

  • TOWNSEND

  • TREGO

  • TROUT CREEK

  • TROY

  • TURNER

  • SILVER STAR

  • TWIN BRIDGES

  • TWO DOT

  • ULM

  • VALIER

  • VANDALIA

  • VAUGHN

  • VICTOR

  • VIDA

  • VIRGINIA CITY

  • VOLBORG

  • WARM SPRINGS

  • WESTBY

  • ESSEX

  • LAKE MC DONALD

  • WEST GLACIER

  • WEST YELLOWSTONE

  • WHITEFISH

  • WHITEHALL

  • WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS

  • WHITETAIL

  • WHITEWATER

  • WHITLASH

  • WIBAUX

  • WILLOW CREEK

  • WILSALL

  • WINIFRED

  • MOSBY

  • WINNETT

  • WISDOM

  • WISE RIVER

  • WOLF CREEK

  • WOLF POINT

  • WORDEN

  • WYOLA

  • ZORTMAN

  • ZURICH

  • CAPITOL

  • BOZEMAN
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in Montana?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in Montana. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in Montana?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in Montana. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in Montana?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in Montana. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of Montana

    Montana is a state in the Western United States. The western third of Montana contains numerous mountain ranges. Smaller “island ranges” are found in the central third of the state, for a total of 77 named ranges that are part of the Rocky Mountains. This geographical fact is reflected in the state’s name, derived from the Spanish word montana (mountain). Montana has several nicknames, none official, including: “Big Sky Country” and “The Treasure State”, and slogans that include “Land of the Shining Mountains” and more recently, “The Last Best Place”. Montana is the 4th-most extensive, but the 7th-least populous and the 3rd-least densely populated of the 50 United States. The economy is primarily based on services, with ranching, wheat farming, oil and coal mining in the east, and lumber, tourism, and hard rock mining in the west. Millions of tourists annually visit Glacier National Park, the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, and three of the five entrances to Yellowstone National Park.

    Etymology and naming history

    The name Montana comes from the Spanish word Montana meaning “mountain” or more broadly, “mountainous country”. Montana del Norte was the name given by early Spanish explorers to describe the entire mountainous region of the west. Historians believe General and former Kansas Territory Governor James W. Denver was aware of this when asked by Senate chairman of the Committee on Territories Stephen A. Douglas for a name of one of the several territories he was planning on proposing. Though Douglas never did introduce a bill with the name Montana, he is credited with at least introducing the name. The name was eventually added to a bill by the United States House Committee on Territories, which was chaired at the time by Rep. James Ashley of Ohio, for the territory that would become Idaho Territory. The name was successfully changed by Representatives Henry Wilson (Massachusetts) and Benjamin F. Harding (Oregon) both complained that Montana had “no meaning”. When Ashley presented a bill to establish a temporary government in 1864, for a new territory to be carved out of Idaho, he again chose Montana Territory. This time Rep. Samuel Cox, also of Ohio, objected to the name. He complained that the name was a misnomer given that most of the territory was not at all mountainous and that an Indian name would be more appropriate than a Spanish one. To this Rep. Elihu Washburne of Illinois jokingly suggested Abyssinia. Cox suggested Shoshone, but its translated meaning of “snake” elicited laughter and a remark that the bill had progressed too far to have the territory’s name changed without unanimous consent. Cox then suggested that the new territory be called ‘Jefferson’, to which Ashley responded, “Oh, well, we are opposed to that.” This astounded Cox, “Opposed to Jefferson! I propose that we name the new territory, by unanimous consent, ‘Douglas Territory.’ I think the gentleman opposite will agree to that,” to which Ashley replied, “Oh, no, we cannot do that.” Rep. John Pruyn then commented that the Governor Lyon of Idaho Territory said he thought the names for the two territories should be reversed given Idaho was more mountainous than Montana. Finally, Rep. Edwin Webster of Maryland stepped in and suggested that every father has the right to name his own child, and since the bill was the progeny of the Committee on Territories, the committee could name it whatever they wanted. After more laughter the name was settled.

    Geography

    With a land area of 147,046 square miles (380,850 km2), Montana is slightly larger than Japan and slightly smaller than Paraguay. It is the fourth largest state in the United States (after Alaska, Texas, and California), the largest landlocked U.S. state, and the 56th largest national state/province subdivision in the world. To the north, Montana shares a 545-mile (877 km) border with three Canadian provinces: British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. To the east, the state borders North Dakota and South Dakota. To the south lies Wyoming and to the west and southwest is Idaho.

    Topography

    The topography of the state is diverse and roughly defined by the Continental Divide, which runs on an approximate diagonal line through the state from northwest to south-central, splitting it into two distinct eastern and western regions. Montana is well known for its mountainous western region, most of which is geologically and geographically part of the Northern Rocky Mountains. The Absaroka and Beartooth ranges in the south are technically part of the Central Rocky Mountains. About 60% of the state is prairie, part of the northern Great Plains. Nonetheless, even east of the Continental Divide and the Rocky Mountain Front, there are a number of isolated “island ranges” that dot the prairie landscape. This island range region covers most of the central third of the state.
    The Bitterroot Mountains-one of the longest continuous ranges in the entire Rocky Mountain chain from Alaska to Mexico-divide the state from Idaho to the west, with the southern third of the range blending into the Continental Divide. Mountain ranges between the Bitterroots and the top of the Continental Divide include the Cabinet Mountains, the Anaconda Range (informally called the “Pintlars”), the Missions, the Garnet Range, Sapphire Mountains, and Flint Creek Range.
    The northern section of the Divide, where the mountains give way rapidly to prairie, is known collectively as the Rocky Mountain Front. The front is most pronounced in the Lewis Range, located primarily in Glacier National Park. Due to the configuration of mountain ranges in Glacier National Park, the Northern Divide (which begins in Alaska’s Seward Peninsula) crosses this region and turns east in Montana at Triple Divide Peak. It causes the Waterton River, Belly, and Saint Mary rivers to flow north into Alberta, Canada. There they join the Saskatchewan River, which ultimately empties into Hudson Bay.
    East of the divide, several parallel ranges march across the southern half of the state, including the Gravelly Range, the Tobacco Roots, the Madison Range, Gallatin Range, Big Belt Mountains, Bridger Mountains, Absaroka Mountains, and the Beartooth Mountains. The Beartooth Plateau is the largest continuous land mass over 10,000 feet (3,000 m) high in the continental United States. It contains the highest point in the state, Granite Peak, 12,799 feet (3,901 m) high.
    Between the mountain ranges are many scenic valleys, rich in agricultural resources and rivers, and possessing multiple opportunities for tourism and recreation. Among the best-known areas are the Big Hole Valley, Bitterroot Valley, Gallatin Valley, Flathead Valley, and Paradise Valley.
    East and north of this transition zone are expansive, sparsely populated Northern Plains, with rolling tableland prairies, “island” mountain ranges, and scenic badlands extending into the Dakotas and Wyoming, as well as Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada. The isolated island ranges east of the Divide include the Bear Paw Mountains, Castle Mountains, Crazy Mountains, Highwood Mountains, Judith Mountains, Little Belt Mountains, Little Rocky Mountains, Snowy Mountains, Sweet Grass Hills, Bull Mountains, the Pryor Mountains south of Billings, and-in the southeastern corner of the state near Ekalaka-the Long Pines.
    The area east of the divide in the north-central portion of the state is known for the Missouri Breaks and other significant rock formations. Three stately buttes south of Great Falls are familiar landmarks. The three: Square, Shaw, and Crown buttes, are made of igneous rock, which is dense and has withstood weathering for many years. The underlying surface consists of shale. Many areas around these buttes are covered with clay surface soils, which have been derived from the weathering of the Colorado Formation. Farther east, areas such as Makoshika State Park near Glendive and Medicine Rocks State Park near Ekalaka also highlight some of the most scenic badlands regions in the state.
    The Hell Creek Formation is a major source of dinosaur fossils. Paleontologist Jack Horner, of the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, brought this formation to the world’s attention with several major finds.

    Rivers

    Montana also contains numerous rivers, many of which are known for “blue-ribbon” trout fishing, while also providing most of the water needed by residents of the state, and hydropower. Montana is one of few geographic areas in the world whose rivers form parts of three major watersheds (i.e. where two continental divides intersect). Its rivers feed the Pacific Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and Hudson Bay, and the watershed areas are divided atop Triple Divide Peak in Glacier National Park.

    Missouri Breaks region in central Montana
    West of the divide, the Clark Fork of the Columbia (not to be confused with the Clarks Fork of the Yellowstone River) rises in the Rocky Mountains near Butte and flows northwest to Missoula, where it is joined by the Blackfoot River and Bitterroot River, and further downstream by the Flathead River, before entering Idaho near Lake Pend Oreille, exiting it by the Pend Oreille River which flows west, then north through Washington into Canada. Just over the border, it meets the Columbia River, which flows to the Pacific Ocean. The Clark Fork discharges the greatest volume of water of any river exiting the state. The Flathead and Kootenai rivers also drain major portions of the western half of the state.
    East of the divide, the Missouri River-formed by the confluence of the Jefferson, Madison, and Gallatin rivers-crosses the central part of the state, flows through the Missouri breaks and enters North Dakota. The Yellowstone River rises in Yellowstone Park in Wyoming, flows north to Livingston, Montana, where it then turns east and flows through Billings, continuing across the state until it joins the Missouri River a few miles east of the North Dakota boundary. The Yellowstone River is the longest undammed, free-flowing river in the contiguous United States.
    Other major Montana tributaries of the Missouri include the Milk, Marias, Tongue, and Musselshell rivers. Montana claims the disputed title of possessing the “world’s shortest river,” the Roe River, just outside Great Falls, Montana. Through the Missouri, these rivers ultimately join the Mississippi River and flow into the Gulf of Mexico.
    The Northern Divide turns east in Montana at Triple Divide Peak. It causes the Waterton River, Belly, and Saint Mary rivers to flow north into Alberta, Canada. There they join the Saskatchewan River, which ultimately empties into Hudson Bay.
    In addition to its rivers, the state is home to Flathead Lake, the largest natural fresh-water lake in the western United States. Man-made reservoirs dot Montana’s rivers, the largest of which is Fort Peck Reservoir, on the Missouri river, contained by the largest earthen dam in the world.

    Flora and fauna

    Vegetation of the state includes lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine; douglas fir, larch, spruce; aspen, birch, red cedar, hemlock, ash, alder; rocky mountain maple and cottonwood trees. Forests cover approximately 25 percent of the state. Flowers native to Montana include asters, bitterroots, daisies, lupins, poppies, primroses, columbine, lilies, orchids, and dryads. Several species of sagebrush and cactus and many species of grasses are common. Many species of mushrooms and lichens are also found in the state.
    Montana is home to a diverse array of fauna that includes 15 amphibian, 85 fish, 110 mammal, 17 reptile and 420 bird species. Additionally, there are over 10,000 invertebrate species, including 180 mollusks and 30 crustaceans. Montana has the largest grizzly bear population in the lower 48 states.

    Parks

    Montana contains Glacier National Park, “The Crown of the Continent”; and portions of Yellowstone National Park, including three of the Park’s five entrances. Other federally recognized sites include the Little Bighorn National Monument, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Big Hole National Battlefield, Lewis and Clark Caverns, and the National Bison Range. Montana has ten National Forests and more than 20 National Wildlife Refuges. The Federal government administers 36,000,000 acres (150,000 km2). 275,000 acres (1,110 km2) are administered as state parks and forests.

    Climate

    Montana is a large state with considerable variation in geography, and the climate is, therefore, equally varied. The state spans from ‘below’ the 45th parallel (the halfway line between the equator and the north pole) to the 49th parallel, and elevations range from under 2,000 feet (610 m) to nearly 13,000 feet (4,000 m) above sea level. The western half is mountainous, interrupted by numerous large valleys. Eastern Montana comprises plains and badlands, broken by hills and isolated mountain ranges, and has a semi-arid, continental climate (Koppen climate classification BSk). The Continental Divide runs north-south through the western mountainous half, and has a great effect on the climate. It restricts the flow of warmer air from the Pacific from moving east, and cooler, drier continental moving west. West of the divide, the climate is described as modified northern Pacific coast climate, with milder winters, cooler summers, less wind, and a longer growing season. In the winter, valley fog and low clouds often form in the valleys west of the divide, but this is rarely seen in the east.
    Average daytime temperatures vary from 28 °F (-2 °C) in January to 84.5 °F (29.2 °C) in July. The variation in geography leads to great variation in temperature. Hot weather occurs in the eastern plains on occasion, the highest observed being 117 °F (47 °C) at Glendive on July 20, 1893, and Medicine Lake on July 5, 1937. Throughout the state, summer nights are generally cool and pleasant. Temperatures decrease as altitude increases, and extremely hot weather is relatively unknown above 4,000 ft (1,200 m). Snowfall is not unknown in any month of the year in parts of Montana, namely in the more mountainous areas of central & western Montana, but is rare in July and August.

    The Big Drift covering the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park as photographed on March 23, 2006.
    The coldest temperature on record for Montana is also the coldest temperature for the entire contiguous U.S. On January 20, 1954, -70 °F (-57 °C) was recorded at a gold mining camp near Rogers Pass. Temperatures vary greatly on such cold nights, and Helena, 40 miles (64 km) to the southeast had a low of only -36 °F (-38 °C). Winter cold spells last a week or so, and are usually the result of cold continental air coming south from Canada. The front is often well defined, causing a large temperature drop in a 24-hour period. Conversely, air flow from the southwest results in “Chinooks”. These steady 25-50 mph (or more) winds can suddenly warm parts of Montana, especially areas just to the east of the mountains, where temperatures sometimes rise up to 50 °F (10 °C) – 60 °F (15 °C).
    Loma is the location of the most extreme recorded temperature change in a 24-hour period in the United States. On January 15, 1972, the temperature rose from -54 °F (-48 °C) to 49 °F (9 °C).
    Average annual precipitation is 15 inches (380 mm), but great variations are seen. The mountain ranges block the moist Pacific air, holding moisture in the western valleys, and creating rain shadows to the east. Heron, in the west, receives the most precipitation, 34.70 inches (881 mm). On the eastern (leeward) side of a mountain range, the valleys are much drier; Lonepine averages 11.45 inches (291 mm), and Deer Lodge 11.00 inches (279 mm) of precipitation. The mountains themselves can receive over 100 inches (2,500 mm), for example the Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park gets 105 inches (2,700 mm). Perhaps the driest is an area southwest of Belfry that averaged only 6.59 inches (167 mm) over a sixteen-year period. Most of the larger cities get 30 to 50 inches (760 to 1,300 mm) of snow each year. Mountain ranges themselves can accumulate 300 inches (7,600 mm) of snow during a winter. Heavy snowstorms may occur as early as September or as late as May, though most snow falls from November to March.
    The climate has become warmer in Montana and continues to do so. The glaciers in Glacier National Park have receded and are predicted to melt away completely in a few decades. Many Montana cities set heat records during July 2007, the hottest month ever recorded in Montana. Winters are warmer, too, and have fewer cold spells. Previously these cold spells had killed off bark beetles which are now attacking the forests of western Montana. The combination of warmer weather, attack by beetles, and mismanagement during past years has led to a substantial increase in the severity of forest fires in Montana. According to a study done for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Science, portions of Montana will experience a 200% increase in area burned by wildland fires, and an 80% increase in air pollution from those fires.

    Antipodes

    Montana is one of only two continental US states (along with Colorado) which is antipodal to land. The Kerguelen Islands are antipodal to the Montana-Saskatchewan-Alberta border. No towns are antipodal to Kerguelen, though Chester and Rudyard are close, about 10 miles to the south.

    History

    Various indigenous peoples lived in the territory of the present-day state of Montana for thousands of years. Historic tribes encountered by Europeans and settlers from the United States included the Crow in the south-central area; the Cheyenne in the southeast; the Blackfeet, Assiniboine and Gros Ventres in the central and north-central area; and the Kootenai and Salish in the west. The smaller Pend d’Oreille and Kalispel tribes lived near Flathead Lake and the western mountains, respectively.
    The land in Montana east of the continental divide was part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Subsequent to the Lewis and Clark Expedition and after the finding of gold and copper (see the Copper Kings) in the area in the late 1850s, Montana became a United States territory (Montana Territory) on May 26, 1864. Prior to the creation of Montana Territory (1864-1889), various parts of what is now Montana were parts of Oregon Territory (1848-1859), Washington Territory (1853-1863), Idaho Territory (1863-1864), and Dakota Territory (1861-1864).
    The Army established a series of posts in the late 1860s, including Fort Shaw, Camp Cooke on the Judith River and Fort C.F. Smith on the Bozeman Trail.
    Montana was the scene of warfare as the Native Americans struggled to maintain control of their land. The Battle of the Little Bighorn was fought near the present-day town of Hardin. Montana was also the location of the final battles of the Nez Perce Wars.
    A series of major mining discoveries in the western third of the state starting in 1862 found gold, silver, copper lead, coal (and later oil) that attracted tens of thousands of miners to the area. The richest of all gold placer diggings was discovered at Alder Gulch, where the town of Virginia City was established. Other rich placer deposits were found at Last Chance Gulch, where the city of Helena now stands, Confederate Gulch, Silver Bow, Emigrant Gulch, and Cooke City. Gold output from 1862 through 1876 reached $144 million; silver then became even more important. The largest mining operations were in the city of Butte, which had important silver deposits and gigantic copper deposits.
    Cattle ranching has been central to Montana’s history and economy since the late-19th century. The Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site in Deer Lodge Valley is maintained as a link to the ranching style of the late 19th century. Operated by the National Park Service, it is a 1,900 acres (7.7 km2) working ranch.
    The railroads arrived in the 1880s, including the Great Northern Railroad (1889) and its rival, the Northern Pacific Railroad (1883) from Minneapolis, and the Union Pacific Railroad (1881) from Denver. Montana railroading, with two transcontinentals to the Pacific coast and extensive operations to the mines, became a major industry, with centers in Billings and Havre. Montana became a state in 1889 in an omnibus package together with North Dakota, South Dakota and Washington. In 1888, Helena (the current state capital) had more millionaires per capita than any other city in the world.
    The revised Homestead Act of 1909 greatly affected the settlement of Montana. This act expanded the amount of free land from 160 acres (0.6 km2) to 320 acres (1.3 km2) per family. Tens of thousands of inexperienced homesteaders arrived, lured by free land and high wheat prices, but they were unprepared for the climate, which usually had little rainfall and required special dry farming techniques. The droughts of 1917-1919 proved devastating, as many left, and half the banks in the state went bankrupt after providing mortgages that could not be repaid. The Great Depression caused further hardship for farmers and ranchers and miners, but the economy bounced back in the 1940s. The wheat farms in eastern Montana make the state a major producer; the wheat has a relatively high protein content and thus commands premium prices. After 1940 tourism became the state’s third largest industry with Yellowstone and Glacier national parks as the largest tourist attractions.
    The planned battleship USS Montana was named in honor of the state. However, the battleship was never completed, making Montana the only one of the 48 states during World War II not to have a battleship named after it. Additionally, Alaska and Hawaii have both had nuclear submarines named after them. As such Montana is the only state in the union without a modern naval ship named in its honor. However, in August 2007 Senator Jon Tester made a request to the Navy that a submarine be christened USS Montana.
    Politics in the state has been competitive, with the Democrats usually holding an edge, thanks to the support among unionized miners and railroad workers. Large-scale battles revolved around the giant Anaconda Copper company, based in Butte and controlled by Rockefeller interests, until it closed in the 1970s. Until 1959, the company owned five of the state’s six largest newspapers.

    American Indian reservations

    Seven American Indian reservations are located in Montana: Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Crow Indian Reservation, Rocky Boy’s Indian Reservation, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, and the Flathead Indian Reservation.

    Cities and towns

    Montana has 56 counties with the United States Census Bureau stating Montana’s contains 364 “places”, broken down into 129 incorporated places and 235 census-designated places. Incorporated places consist of 52 cities, 75 towns, and two consolidated city-counties. Montana has one city, Billings, with a population over 100,000; and two cities with populations over 50,000, Missoula and Great Falls. These three communities are considered the centers of Montana’s three Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The state also has five Micropolitan Statistical Areas centered on Bozeman, Butte, Helena, Kalispell and Havre*. These communities, excluding Havre, are colloquially known as the “big 7” Montana cities, as they are consistently the seven largest communities in Montana, with a significant population difference when these communities are compared to those that are 8th and lower on the list, and the only communities to host major airports. Based on 2000 census numbers, they collectively contain 34 percent of Montana’s population. and the counties containing these communities hold more than 60 percent of the state’s population.

    Demographics

    The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Montana was 1,005,141 on July 1, 2012, a 1.6% increase since the 2010 United States Census. On January 3, 2012, the Census and Economic Information Center (CEIC) at the Montana Department of Commerce estimated Montana had hit the one million mark sometime between November and December, 2011.
    The 2010 census put Montana’s population at 989,415 which is an increase of 87,220 people, or 9.7 percent, since the year 2000. Growth is mainly concentrated in Montana’s seven largest counties, with the heaviest percentile growth in Gallatin County, which saw a 32% increase in its population since 2000. The city seeing the largest percentile growth was Kalispell with 40.1%. The city with the largest actual growth was Billings with an increase in population of 14,323 since 2000.
    According to the 2010 Census, 89.4% of the population was White (87.8% Non-Hispanic White Alone), 0.4% Black or African American, 6.3% American Indian and Alaska Native, 0.6% Asian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, 0.6% from Some Other Race, and 2.5% from Two or More Races. Hispanics and Latinos of any race made up 2.9% of the population.
    The largest European ancestry groups in Montana are: German (29.3%), Irish (16.4%), English (13.1%), and Norwegian (10%). In addition, 5.9% of the people identified their ancestry as “American”.
    According to 2010 U.S. Census the population of Montana’s seven most populous areas are Billings, Missoula, Great Falls, Bozeman, Butte, Helena and Kalispell.
    According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 94.8 percent of the population aged 5 and older speak English at home.
    The center of population of Montana is located in Meagher County, in the city of White Sulphur Springs.

    Ancestry

    Apart from the sizable American Indian population, nearly 90% of its residents are of European descent, with a large numbers of German, Irish, British, Slavic, Italian, and Scandinavian immigrants arriving between 1890 and 1910. About 2000-3000 Chinese miners were in Montana by 1870, and 2500 in 1890. They were strongly opposed by labor unions, and public opinion grew increasingly negative in the 1890s and nearly half left the state by 1900.
    While German ancestry is the largest reported European-American ancestry in Montana as a whole, residents of Scandinavian ancestry are prevalent in some of the farming-dominated northern and eastern prairie regions, parallel to nearby regions of North Dakota and Minnesota. Irish and English are the second and third largest European ancestral groups in the state. There are also several predominantly Native American counties, mainly around each of the seven Indian reservations. The state has a larger Native American population (and percentage) than most US states. The seven reservations are actually made of more than twelve distinct Native American ethnolinguistic groups. The historically mining-oriented communities of western Montana such as Butte have a wider range of ethnic groups, and are particularly rich in European-American ethnicity; Finns, Eastern Europeans and especially Irish settlers left an indelible mark on the city, as well as people originally from British mining regions such as Cornwall, Devon and Wales. The nearby city of Helena, also founded as a mining camp, had a similar mix in addition to a small Chinatown, and the Chinese in Montana, while a low percentage today, have historically been an important presence. Montanans who claim Filipino ancestry amount to almost 3,000, making them the largest Asian American group in the state. Throughout the nineteenth century, many farmers of German, Scandinavian, Irish, Scots, and English roots settled in Montana. In addition, the Hutterites, originally from Central Europe, settled here, and today Montana is second only to South Dakota in U.S. Hutterite population with several colonies spread across the state. Many of Montana’s historic logging communities originally attracted people of Scottish, Scandinavian, Slavic, English and Scots-Irish descent. Montana’s Hispanic population is concentrated around the Billings area in south-central Montana, where many of Montana’s Mexican-Americans have been in the state for generations. The highest density of African-Americans is located in Great Falls.

    Economy

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Montana’s total state product in 2003 was $26 billion. Per capita personal income in 2003 was $25,406, 47th in the nation. However, this number is rapidly increasing.
    Agriculture is a major employer in Montana. Approximately 66% of the total land are dedicated to farmland or agriculture. In 2009, all field crops harvested in the state of Montana were valued at 1.8 billion US dollars. Montana ranked second nationally, in 2007, for the production of lentils, dry peas and barley. The same year, the state ranked third for total wheat production. Montana’s most valuable crop is wheat, followed by hay, and then barley. Montana ranked second in 2009, nationally, for the production of safflower and third for canola. On January 1, 2009 there were 2,550,000 head of cattle and calves and 255,000 head of sheep and lambs. Montana raises lots of sheep and goats on its rangeland. The state ranks 10th nationally for sheep and goat production and their products, like wool.
    Montana is a relative hub of beer microbrewing, ranking second in the nation in number of craft breweries per capita. There are significant industries for lumber and mineral extraction; the state’s resources include gold, coal, silver, talc, and vermiculite. Ecotaxes on resource extraction are numerous. A 1974 state severance tax on coal (which varied from 20 to 30 percent) was upheld by the Supreme Court of the United States in Commonwealth Edison Co. v. Montana, 453 U.S. 609 (1981).
    Tourism is also important to the economy with millions of visitors a year to Glacier National Park, Flathead Lake, the Missouri River headwaters, the site of the Battle of Little Bighorn and three of the five entrances to Yellowstone National Park.
    Montana’s personal income tax contains 7 brackets, with rates ranging from 1% to 6.9%. Montana has no sales tax. In Montana, household goods are exempt from property taxes. However, property taxes are assessed on livestock, farm machinery, heavy equipment, automobiles, trucks, and business equipment. The amount of property tax owed is not determined solely by the property’s value. The property’s value is multiplied by a tax rate, set by the Montana Legislature, to determine its taxable value. The taxable value is then multiplied by the mill levy established by various taxing jurisdictions-city and county government, school districts and others.
    As of June 2012, the state’s unemployment rate is 6.3%.