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Phone Answering Service in New Hampshire

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    • 1 to 3 days

      Manchester

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • MANCHESTER

  • ACWORTH

  • ALSTEAD

  • ALTON

  • ALTON BAY

  • AMHERST

  • ANDOVER

  • ANTRIM

  • ASHLAND

  • ASHUELOT

  • ATKINSON

  • AUBURN

  • BARNSTEAD

  • BARRINGTON

  • BARTLETT

  • BATH

  • BEDFORD

  • BELMONT

  • BENNINGTON

  • BERLIN

  • BETHLEHEM

  • BOW

  • BRADFORD

  • BRETTON WOODS

  • BRISTOL

  • BROOKLINE

  • CAMPTON

  • CANAAN

  • CANDIA

  • CANTERBURY

  • CENTER BARNSTEAD

  • CENTER CONWAY

  • CENTER HARBOR

  • CENTER OSSIPEE

  • CENTER SANDWICH

  • CENTER STRAFFORD

  • CENTER TUFTONBORO

  • CHARLESTOWN

  • CHESTER

  • CHESTERFIELD

  • CHICHESTER

  • CHOCORUA

  • CLAREMONT

  • COLEBROOK

  • CONCORD

  • CONTOOCOOK

  • CONWAY

  • CORNISH

  • CORNISH FLAT

  • DANBURY

  • DANVILLE

  • DEERFIELD

  • DERRY

  • DOVER

  • DREWSVILLE

  • DUBLIN

  • DUNBARTON

  • DURHAM

  • EAST ANDOVER

  • EAST CANDIA

  • EAST DERRY

  • EAST HAMPSTEAD

  • EAST KINGSTON

  • EAST WAKEFIELD

  • EATON CENTER

  • EFFINGHAM

  • ELKINS

  • ENFIELD

  • ENFIELD CENTER

  • EPPING

  • EPSOM

  • ERROL

  • ETNA

  • EXETER

  • FARMINGTON

  • FITZWILLIAM

  • FRANCESTOWN

  • FRANCONIA

  • FRANKLIN

  • FREEDOM

  • FREMONT

  • GEORGES MILLS

  • GILFORD

  • GILMANTON

  • GILMANTON IRON WORKS

  • GILSUM

  • GLEN

  • GLENCLIFF

  • GOFFSTOWN

  • GORHAM

  • GOSHEN

  • GRAFTON

  • GRANTHAM

  • GREENFIELD

  • GREENLAND

  • GREENVILLE

  • GROVETON

  • GUILD

  • HAMPSTEAD

  • HAMPTON

  • HAMPTON FALLS

  • HANCOCK

  • HANOVER

  • HARRISVILLE

  • HAVERHILL

  • HEBRON

  • HENNIKER

  • HILL

  • HILLSBOROUGH

  • HINSDALE

  • HOLDERNESS

  • HOLLIS

  • HOOKSETT

  • HUDSON

  • INTERVALE

  • JACKSON

  • JAFFREY

  • JEFFERSON

  • KEARSARGE

  • KEENE

  • KINGSTON

  • LACONIA

  • LANCASTER

  • LEBANON

  • LEE

  • LEMPSTER

  • LINCOLN

  • LISBON

  • LITCHFIELD

  • LITTLETON

  • LOCHMERE

  • LONDONDERRY

  • LOUDON

  • LYME

  • LYME CENTER

  • LYNDEBOROUGH

  • MADBURY

  • MADISON

  • MARLBOROUGH

  • MARLOW

  • MELVIN VILLAGE

  • MEREDITH

  • MERIDEN

  • MERRIMACK

  • MILAN

  • MILFORD

  • MILTON

  • MILTON MILLS

  • MIRROR LAKE

  • MONROE

  • MONT VERNON

  • MOULTONBOROUGH

  • MOUNT WASHINGTON

  • NASHUA

  • NELSON

  • NEW BOSTON

  • NEW CASTLE

  • NEW DURHAM

  • NEW HAMPTON

  • NEW IPSWICH

  • NEW LONDON

  • NEWBURY

  • NEWFIELDS

  • NEWINGTON

  • NEWMARKET

  • NEWPORT

  • NEWTON

  • NEWTON JUNCTION

  • NORTH CONWAY

  • NORTH HAMPTON

  • NORTH HAVERHILL

  • NORTH SALEM

  • NORTH SANDWICH

  • NORTH STRATFORD

  • NORTH SUTTON

  • NORTH WALPOLE

  • NORTH WOODSTOCK

  • NORTHWOOD

  • NOTTINGHAM

  • ORFORD

  • OSSIPEE

  • PELHAM

  • PETERBOROUGH

  • PIERMONT

  • PIKE

  • PITTSBURG

  • PITTSFIELD

  • PLAINFIELD

  • PLAISTOW

  • PLYMOUTH

  • PORTSMOUTH

  • RANDOLPH

  • RAYMOND

  • RINDGE

  • ROCHESTER

  • ROLLINSFORD

  • RUMNEY

  • RYE

  • RYE BEACH

  • SALEM

  • SALISBURY

  • SANBORNTON

  • SANBORNVILLE

  • SANDOWN

  • SEABROOK

  • SILVER LAKE

  • SOMERSWORTH

  • SOUTH ACWORTH

  • SOUTH NEWBURY

  • SOUTH SUTTON

  • SOUTH TAMWORTH

  • SPOFFORD

  • SPRINGFIELD

  • STINSON LAKE

  • STODDARD

  • STRAFFORD

  • STRATHAM

  • SUGAR HILL

  • SULLIVAN

  • SUNAPEE

  • SUNCOOK

  • SWANZEY

  • TAMWORTH

  • TEMPLE

  • THORNTON

  • TILTON

  • TROY

  • TWIN MOUNTAIN

  • UNION

  • WALPOLE

  • WARNER

  • WARREN

  • WASHINGTON

  • WATERVILLE VALLEY

  • WEARE

  • WENTWORTH

  • WEST CHESTERFIELD

  • WEST LEBANON

  • WEST NOTTINGHAM

  • WEST OSSIPEE

  • WEST PETERBOROUGH

  • WEST STEWARTSTOWN

  • WEST SWANZEY

  • WESTMORELAND

  • WHITEFIELD

  • WILMOT

  • WILTON

  • WINCHESTER

  • WINDHAM

  • WINNISQUAM

  • WOLFEBORO

  • WOLFEBORO FALLS

  • WONALANCET

  • WOODSTOCK

  • WOODSVILLE
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in New Hampshire?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in New Hampshire. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in New Hampshire?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in New Hampshire. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in New Hampshire?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in New Hampshire. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of New Hampshire

    New Hampshire is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America. The state was named after the southern English county of Hampshire. It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, Vermont to the west, Maine and the Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. New Hampshire is the 5th smallest and the 9th least populous of the 50 United States.
    It became the first of the British North American colonies to break away from Great Britain in January 1776, and six months later was one of the original thirteen states that founded the United States of America. In June 1788, it became the ninth state to ratify the United States Constitution, bringing that document into effect. New Hampshire was the first U.S. state to have its own state constitution.
    It is known internationally for the New Hampshire primary, the first primary in the U.S. presidential election cycle. Concord is the state capital, while Manchester is the largest city in the state. It has no general sales tax, nor is personal income (other than interest and dividends) taxed at either the state or local level.
    Its license plates carry the state motto: “Live Free or Die”. The state’s nickname, “The Granite State”, refers to its extensive granite formations and quarries.
    Among prominent individuals from New Hampshire are founding father Nicholas Gilman, Senator Daniel Webster, Revolutionary War hero John Stark, editor Horace Greeley, founder of the Christian Science religion Mary Baker Eddy, poet Robert Frost, astronaut Alan Shepard, and author Dan Brown. New Hampshire has produced one president: Franklin Pierce.
    With some of the largest ski mountains on the East Coast, New Hampshire’s major recreational attractions include skiing, snowmobiling and other winter sports, hiking and mountaineering, observing the fall foliage, summer cottages along many lakes and the seacoast, motor sports at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway, and Motorcycle Week, a popular motorcycle rally held in Weirs Beach near Laconia in June. The White Mountain National Forest links the Vermont and Maine portions of the Appalachian Trail, and boasts the Mount Washington Auto Road, where visitors may drive to the top of 6,288-foot (1,917 m) Mount Washington.

    Geography

    New Hampshire is part of the New England region. It is bounded by Quebec, Canada, to the north and northwest; Maine and the Atlantic Ocean to the east; Massachusetts to the south; and Vermont to the west. New Hampshire’s major regions are the Great North Woods, the White Mountains, the Lakes Region, the Seacoast, the Merrimack Valley, the Monadnock Region, and the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee area. New Hampshire has the shortest ocean coastline of any U.S. coastal state, with a length of 18 miles (29 km). New Hampshire was home to the rock formation called the Old Man of the Mountain, a face-like profile in Franconia Notch, until the formation fell apart in May 2003.
    The White Mountains range in New Hampshire spans the north-central portion of the state, with Mount Washington the tallest in the northeastern U.S. – site of the second-highest wind speed ever recorded – and other mountains like Mount Madison and Mount Adams surrounding it. With hurricane-force winds every third day on average, over 100 recorded deaths among visitors, and conspicuous krumholtz (dwarf, matted trees much like a carpet of bonsai trees), the climate on the upper reaches of Mount Washington has inspired the weather observatory on the peak to claim that the area has the “World’s Worst Weather”.
    In the flatter southwest corner of New Hampshire, the landmark Mount Monadnock has given its name to a class of earth-forms – a monadnock – signifying, in geomorphology, any isolated resistant peak rising from a less resistant eroded plain.
    Major rivers include the 110-mile (177 km) Merrimack River, which bisects the lower half of the state north-south and ends up in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Its tributaries include the Contoocook River, Pemigewasset River, and Winnipesaukee River. The 410-mile (660 km) Connecticut River, which starts at New Hampshire’s Connecticut Lakes and flows south to Connecticut, defines the western border with Vermont. The state border is not in the center of that river, as usually the case, but at the low-water mark on the Vermont side; meaning that the entire river along the Vermont border (save for areas where the water level has been raised by a dam) lies within New Hampshire. Only one town – Pittsburg – shares a land border with the state of Vermont. The “northwesternmost headwaters” of the Connecticut also define the Canadian border with New Hampshire.
    The Piscataqua River and its several tributaries form the state’s only significant ocean port where they flow into the Atlantic at Portsmouth. The Salmon Falls River and the Piscataqua define the southern portion of the border with Maine. The Piscataqua River boundary was the subject of a border dispute between New Hampshire and Maine in 2001, with New Hampshire claiming dominion over several islands (primarily Seavey’s Island) that include the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. The U.S. Supreme Court dismissed the case in 2002, leaving ownership of the island with Maine.
    The largest of New Hampshire’s lakes is Lake Winnipesaukee, which covers 71 square miles (184 km2) in the east-central part of New Hampshire. Umbagog Lake along the Maine border, approximately 12.3 square miles (31.9 km2), is a distant second. Squam Lake is the second largest lake entirely in New Hampshire.
    New Hampshire has the shortest ocean coastline of any state in the United States, approximately 18 miles (29 km) long.Hampton Beach is a popular local summer destination. About 7 miles (11 km) offshore are the Isles of Shoals, nine small islands (four of which are in New Hampshire) known as the site of a 19th-century art colony founded by poet Celia Thaxter, as well as the alleged location of one of the buried treasures of the pirate Blackbeard.
    It is the state with the second highest percentage of timberland area in the country, after Maine. New Hampshire is in the temperate broadleaf and mixed forests biome. Much of the state, in particular the White Mountains, is covered by the conifers and northern hardwoods of the New England-Acadian forests. The southeast corner of the state and parts of the Connecticut River along the Vermont border are covered by the mixed oaks of the Northeastern coastal forests.
    The northern third of the state is locally referred to as the “north country” or “north of the notches,” in reference to White Mountain passes that channel traffic. It contains less than 5% of the state’s population, suffers relatively high poverty, and is steadily losing population as the logging and paper industries decline. However, the tourist industry, in particular visitors who go to northern New Hampshire to ski, snowboard, hike and mountain bike has helped offset economic losses from mill closures.

    Climate

    New Hampshire experiences a humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa in southern areas and Dfb in the north), with warm, humid summers, cold, wet winters, and uniform precipitation all year. The climate of the southeastern portion is moderated by the Atlantic Ocean and averages relatively milder and wetter weather, while the northern and interior portions experience cooler temperatures and lower humidity. Winters are cold and snowy throughout the state, and especially severe in the northern and mountainous areas. Average annual snowfall ranges from 60 inches (150 cm) to over 100 inches (250 cm) across the state.
    Average daytime highs are in the mid 70s°F to low 80s°F (around 24-28 °C) throughout the state in July, with overnight lows in the mid 50s°F to low 60s°F (13-15 °C). January temperatures range from an average high of 34 °F (1 °C) on the coast to overnight lows below 0 °F (-18 °C) in the far north and at high elevations. Average annual precipitation statewide is roughly 40 inches (100 cm) with some variation occurring in the White Mountains due to differences in elevation and annual snowfall. New Hampshire’s highest recorded temperature was 106 °F (41 °C) in Nashua on July 4, 1911, while the lowest recorded temperature was -47 °F (-44 °C) atop Mount Washington on January 29, 1934. Mount Washington also saw an unofficial -50 °F (-46 °C) reading on January 22, 1885, which, if made official, would tie the all-time record low for New England (also -50 °F (-46 °C) at Big Black River, Maine on January 16, 2009, and Bloomfield, Vermont on December 30, 1933).
    Extreme snow is often associated with a nor’easter, such as the Blizzard of ’78 and the Blizzard of 1993, when several feet accumulated across portions of the state over 24 to 48 hours. Lighter snowfalls of several inches occur frequently throughout winter, often associated with an Alberta Clipper.
    New Hampshire, on occasion, is affected by hurricanes and tropical storms although by the time they reach the state they are often extratropical, with most storms striking the southern New England coastline and moving inland or passing by offshore in the Gulf of Maine. Most of New Hampshire averages fewer than 20 days of thunderstorms per year and an average of two tornadoes occur annually statewide.
    The National Arbor Day Foundation plant hardiness zone map depicts zones 3, 4, 5, and 6 occurring throughout the state and indicates the transition from a relatively cooler to warmer climate as one travels southward across New Hampshire. The 1990 USDA plant hardiness zones for New Hampshire range from zone 3b in the north to zone 5b in the south.

    History

    Various Algonquian (Abenaki and Pennacook) tribes inhabited the area prior to European settlement. English and French explorers visited New Hampshire in 1600-1605, and English fishermen settled at Odiorne’s Point in present-day Rye in 1623. The first permanent settlement was at Hilton’s Point (present-day Dover). By 1631, the Upper Plantation comprised modern-day Dover, Durham and Stratham; in 1679, it became the “Royal Province.” Father Rale’s War was fought between the colonists and the Wabanaki Confederacy throughout New Hampshire.
    New Hampshire was one of the thirteen colonies that rebelled against British rule during the American Revolution. By the time of the American Revolution, New Hampshire was a divided province. The economic and social life of the Seacoast revolved around sawmills, shipyards, merchant’s warehouses, and established village and town centers. Wealthy merchants built substantial homes, furnished them with the finest luxuries, and invested their capital in trade and land speculation. At the other end of the social scale, there developed a permanent class of day laborers, mariners, indentured servants and even slaves.
    The only battle fought in New Hampshire was the raid on Fort William and Mary, December 14, 1774, in Portsmouth Harbor, which netted the rebellion sizable quantities of gunpowder, small arms and cannon. (General Sullivan, leader of the raid, described it as, “remainder of the powder, the small arms, bayonets, and cartouche-boxes, together with the cannon and ordnance stores”) over the course of two nights. This raid was preceded by a warning to local patriots the previous day, by Paul Revere on December 13, 1774, that the fort was to be reinforced by troops sailing from Boston. According to unverified accounts, the gunpowder was later used at the Battle of Bunker Hill, transported there by Major Demerit, who was one of several New Hampshire patriots who stored the powder in their homes until it was transported elsewhere for use in revolutionary activities.
    New Hampshire was a Jacksonian stronghold; the state sent Franklin Pierce to the White House in the election of 1852. Industrialization took the form of numerous textile mills, which in turn attracted large flows of immigrants from Quebec (the “French Canadians”) and Ireland. The northern parts of the state produced lumber and the mountains provided tourist attractions. After 1960, the textile industry collapsed, but the economy rebounded as a center of high technology and a service provider.
    Since 1952, New Hampshire gained national and international attention for its presidential primary held early in every presidential election year. It immediately became the most important testing grounds for candidates for the Republican and Democratic nominations. The media gave New Hampshire (and Iowa) about half of all the attention paid to all states in the primary process, magnifying the state’s decision powers (and spurring repeated efforts by out-of-state politicians to change the rules.)

    Economy

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that New Hampshire’s total state product in 2008 was $60 billion, ranking 40th in the United States. Median household income in 2008 was $49,467, the seventh highest in the country. Its agricultural outputs are dairy products, nursery stock, cattle, apples and eggs. Its industrial outputs are machinery, electric equipment, rubber and plastic products and tourism.
    New Hampshire experienced a significant shift in its economic base during the last century. Historically, the base was composed of the traditional New England manufactures of textiles, shoe making, and small machining shops drawing upon low-wage labor from nearby small farms and from parts of Quebec. Today, these sectors contribute only 2% for textiles, 2% for leather goods, and 9% for machining of the state’s total manufacturing dollar value (Source: U.S. Economic Census for 1997, Manufacturing, New Hampshire). They experienced a sharp decline due to obsolete plants and the lure of cheaper wages in the South.
    The state’s budget in FY2008 was $5.11 billion, including $1.48 billion in federal funds. The issue of taxation is controversial in New Hampshire, which has a property tax (subject to municipal control) but no broad sales tax or income tax. The state does have narrower taxes on meals, lodging, vehicles, business and investment income, and tolls on state roads.
    According to the Energy Information Administration, New Hampshire’s energy consumption and per capita energy consumption are among the lowest in the country. The Seabrook Station Nuclear Power Plant, located near Portsmouth, is the largest nuclear reactor in New England and provides about 30 percent of New Hampshire’s electricity. Two natural gas-fired plants and some fossil-fuel powered plants, including the coal-fired Merrimack Station plant in Bow, provide most of the rest.
    New Hampshire’s residential electricity use is low compared with the national average, in part because demand for air conditioning is low during the generally mild summer months and because few households use electricity as their primary energy source for home heating. Over half of New Hampshire households use fuel oil for winter heating. New Hampshire has potential for renewable energies like wind power, hydroelectricity, and wood fuel.
    The state has no general sales tax and no personal state income tax (the state does tax, at a 5 percent rate, income from dividends and interest) and the legislature has exercised fiscal restraint. Efforts to diversify the state’s general economy have been ongoing.
    Additionally, New Hampshire’s lack of a broad-based tax system (aside from the controversial statewide property tax) has resulted in the state’s local communities having some of the nation’s highest property taxes. Overall, New Hampshire remains ranked 49th among states in combined average state and local tax burden.
    As of February 2010, the state’s unemployment rate was 7.1%. By October 2010, the unemployment rate dropped to 5.4%.