Find Location on Map

Phone Answering Service in North Dakota

Need Help?
Request a call back!
Map DataMap data ©2013 GoogleTerms of Use
Map Data
Map data ©2013 Google
Map data ©2013 Google

    • 1 to 3 days

      Fargo

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

    • 1 to 3 days

      Bismarck

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • FARGO

  • BISMARCK

  • ABERCROMBIE

  • ABSARAKA

  • ADAMS

  • AGATE

  • ALAMO

  • ALEXANDER

  • ALMONT

  • ALSEN

  • AMBROSE

  • AMENIA

  • AMIDON

  • ANAMOOSE

  • ANETA

  • ANTLER

  • ARGUSVILLE

  • ARNEGARD

  • ARTHUR

  • ARVILLA

  • ASHLEY

  • AYR

  • BALDWIN

  • BALFOUR

  • BALTA

  • BANTRY

  • BARNEY

  • BATHGATE

  • BEACH

  • BELCOURT

  • BELFIELD

  • BENEDICT

  • BERLIN

  • BERTHOLD

  • BEULAH

  • BINFORD

  • BISBEE

  • BLANCHARD

  • BOTTINEAU

  • BOWBELLS

  • BOWDON

  • BOWMAN

  • BRADDOCK

  • BREMEN

  • BROCKET

  • BUCHANAN

  • BUFFALO

  • BURLINGTON

  • BUTTE

  • BUXTON

  • CALEDONIA

  • CALVIN

  • CANDO

  • CANNON BALL

  • CARPIO

  • CARRINGTON

  • CARSON

  • CARTWRIGHT

  • CASSELTON

  • CATHAY

  • CAVALIER

  • CAYUGA

  • CENTER

  • CHASELEY

  • CHRISTINE

  • CHURCHS FERRY

  • CLEVELAND

  • CLIFFORD

  • COGSWELL

  • COLEHARBOR

  • COLFAX

  • COLUMBUS

  • COOPERSTOWN

  • COURTENAY

  • CRARY

  • CROSBY

  • CRYSTAL

  • CUMMINGS

  • DAHLEN

  • DAVENPORT

  • DAWSON

  • DAZEY

  • DEERING

  • DENHOFF

  • DES LACS

  • DEVILS LAKE

  • DICKEY

  • DICKINSON

  • DODGE

  • DONNYBROOK

  • DOUGLAS

  • DRAKE

  • DRAYTON

  • DRISCOLL

  • DUNN CENTER

  • DUNSEITH

  • EDGELEY

  • EDINBURG

  • EDMORE

  • EGELAND

  • ELGIN

  • ELLENDALE

  • EMERADO

  • ENDERLIN

  • EPPING

  • ERIE

  • ESMOND

  • FAIRDALE

  • FAIRFIELD

  • FAIRMOUNT

  • FESSENDEN

  • FINGAL

  • FINLEY

  • FLASHER

  • FLAXTON

  • FORBES

  • FORDVILLE

  • FOREST RIVER

  • FORMAN

  • FORT RANSOM

  • FORT TOTTEN

  • FORT YATES

  • FORTUNA

  • FREDONIA

  • FULLERTON

  • GACKLE

  • GALESBURG

  • GARDNER

  • GARRISON

  • GILBY

  • GLADSTONE

  • GLASSTON

  • GLEN ULLIN

  • GLENBURN

  • GLENFIELD

  • GOLDEN VALLEY

  • GOLVA

  • GOODRICH

  • GRACE CITY

  • GRAFTON

  • GRAND FORKS

  • GRAND FORKS AFB

  • GRANDIN

  • GRANVILLE

  • GRASSY BUTTE

  • GRENORA

  • GWINNER

  • HAGUE

  • HALLIDAY

  • HAMILTON

  • HAMPDEN

  • HANKINSON

  • HANNAFORD

  • HANNAH

  • HANSBORO

  • HARVEY

  • HARWOOD

  • HATTON

  • HAVANA

  • HAZELTON

  • HAZEN

  • HEBRON

  • HENSEL

  • HETTINGER

  • HILLSBORO

  • HOOPLE

  • HOPE

  • HORACE

  • HUNTER

  • HURDSFIELD

  • INKSTER

  • JAMESTOWN

  • JESSIE

  • JUD

  • KARLSRUHE

  • KATHRYN

  • KEENE

  • KENMARE

  • KENSAL

  • KILLDEER

  • KINDRED

  • KINTYRE

  • KNOX

  • KRAMER

  • KULM

  • LAKOTA

  • LAMOURE

  • LANGDON

  • LANKIN

  • LANSFORD

  • LARIMORE

  • LAWTON

  • LEEDS

  • LEFOR

  • LEHR

  • LEONARD

  • LIDGERWOOD

  • LIGNITE

  • LINTON

  • LISBON

  • LITCHVILLE

  • LUVERNE

  • MADDOCK

  • MAIDA

  • MAKOTI

  • MANDAN

  • MANDAREE

  • MANNING

  • MANTADOR

  • MANVEL

  • MAPLETON

  • MARION

  • MARMARTH

  • MARSHALL

  • MARTIN

  • MAX

  • MAXBASS

  • MAYVILLE

  • MCCLUSKY

  • MCGREGOR

  • MCHENRY

  • MCLEOD

  • MCVILLE

  • MEDINA

  • MEDORA

  • MEKINOCK

  • MENOKEN

  • MERCER

  • MICHIGAN

  • MILNOR

  • MILTON

  • MINNEWAUKAN

  • MINOT

  • MINOT AFB

  • MINTO

  • MOFFIT

  • MOHALL

  • MONTPELIER

  • MOORETON

  • MOTT

  • MOUNTAIN

  • MUNICH

  • MYLO

  • NAPOLEON

  • NECHE

  • NEKOMA

  • NEW ENGLAND

  • NEW LEIPZIG

  • NEW ROCKFORD

  • NEW SALEM

  • NEW TOWN

  • NEWBURG

  • NIAGARA

  • NOME

  • NOONAN

  • NORTHWOOD

  • NORWICH

  • OAKES

  • OBERON

  • ORISKA

  • OSNABROCK

  • PAGE

  • PALERMO

  • PARK RIVER

  • PARSHALL

  • PEKIN

  • PEMBINA

  • PENN

  • PERTH

  • PETERSBURG

  • PETTIBONE

  • PILLSBURY

  • PINGREE

  • PISEK

  • PLAZA

  • PORTAL

  • PORTLAND

  • POWERS LAKE

  • RALEIGH

  • RAY

  • REEDER

  • REGAN

  • REGENT

  • REYNOLDS

  • RHAME

  • RICHARDTON

  • RIVERDALE

  • ROBINSON

  • ROCKLAKE

  • ROGERS

  • ROLETTE

  • ROLLA

  • ROSEGLEN

  • ROSS

  • RUGBY

  • RUSO

  • RUTLAND

  • RYDER

  • SAINT ANTHONY

  • SAINT JOHN

  • SAINT MICHAEL

  • SAINT THOMAS

  • SANBORN

  • SARLES

  • SAWYER

  • SCRANTON

  • SELFRIDGE

  • SENTINEL BUTTE

  • SHARON

  • SHELDON

  • SHERWOOD

  • SHEYENNE

  • SHIELDS

  • SOLEN

  • SOURIS

  • SOUTH HEART

  • SPIRITWOOD

  • STANLEY

  • STANTON

  • STARKWEATHER

  • STEELE

  • STERLING

  • STIRUM

  • STRASBURG

  • STREETER

  • SURREY

  • SUTTON

  • SYKESTON

  • TAPPEN

  • TAYLOR

  • THOMPSON

  • TIOGA

  • TOKIO

  • TOLLEY

  • TOLNA

  • TOWER CITY

  • TOWNER

  • TRENTON

  • TURTLE LAKE

  • TUTTLE

  • UNDERWOOD

  • UPHAM

  • VALLEY CITY

  • VELVA

  • VERONA

  • VOLTAIRE

  • WAHPETON

  • WALCOTT

  • WALES

  • WALHALLA

  • WARWICK

  • WASHBURN

  • WATFORD CITY

  • WEBSTER

  • WEST FARGO

  • WESTHOPE

  • WHEATLAND

  • WHITE EARTH

  • WILDROSE

  • WILLISTON

  • WILLOW CITY

  • WILTON

  • WIMBLEDON

  • WING

  • WISHEK

  • WOLFORD

  • WOODWORTH

  • WYNDMERE

  • YORK

  • YPSILANTI

  • ZAHL

  • ZAP

  • ZEELAND
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in North Dakota?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in North Dakota. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in North Dakota?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in North Dakota. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in North Dakota?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in North Dakota. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of North Dakota

    North Dakota is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States, along the Canadian border. The state is bordered by the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan to the north, Minnesota to the east, South Dakota to the south and Montana to the west. North Dakota is the 19th most extensive but the 3rd least populous and the 4th least densely populated of the 50 United States. North Dakota was created from the northern portion of the Dakota Territory and admitted to the Union on November 2, 1889, simultaneously with South Dakota.
    The state capitol is located in Bismarck and the largest city is Fargo. The primary public universities are located in Grand Forks and Fargo. The U.S. Air Force operates air bases at Minot AFB and Grand Forks AFB.
    In recent years the state has had a strong economy, with unemployment lower than the national average and strong job and population growth. Much of the growth has been based on development of the Bakken oil fields in the western part of the state.
    Ethnically, the majority of North Dakotans are of Norwegian and German descent. There is also a sizable minority of other ethnic groups in the state as well.

    Geography

    North Dakota is located in the U.S. region known as the Great Plains. The state shares the Red River of the North with Minnesota on the east; South Dakota is to the south, Montana is to the west, and the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba are north. North Dakota is situated near the middle of North America with a stone marker in Rugby, North Dakota marking the “Geographic Center of the North American Continent”. With an area of 70,762 square miles (183,273 km2), North Dakota is the 19th largest state.
    The western half of the state consists of the hilly Great Plains, and the northern part of the Badlands to the west of the Missouri River. The state’s high point, White Butte at 3,506 feet (1,069 m), and Theodore Roosevelt National Park are located in the Badlands. The region is abundant in fossil fuels including natural gas,crude oil and lignite coal. The Missouri River forms Lake Sakakawea, the third largest man-made lake in the United States, behind the Garrison Dam.
    The central region of the state is divided into the Drift Prairie and the Missouri Plateau. The eastern part of the state consists of the flat Red River Valley, the bottom of glacial Lake Agassiz. Its fertile soil, drained by the meandering Red River flowing northward into Lake Winnipeg, supports a large agriculture industry. Devils Lake, the largest natural lake in the state, is also found in the east.
    Eastern North Dakota is overall flat, however, there are significant hills and buttes in western North Dakota. Most of the state is covered in grassland; crops cover most of eastern North Dakota but are sparse in the center and west. Natural trees in North Dakota are found usually where there is good drainage such as the ravines and valley near the Pembina Gorge and Killdeer Mountains, the Turtle Mountains, the hills around Devil’s Lake, in the dunes area of McHenry County in central North Dakota, and along the Sheyenne Valley slopes and the Sheyenne delta. This diverse terrain supports nearly 2,000 species of plants.

    History

    Prior to European contact, Native Americans inhabited North Dakota for thousands of years. The first European to reach the area was the French-Canadian trader La Verendrye, who led an exploration party to Mandan villages in 1738. The trading arrangement between tribes was such that North Dakota tribes rarely dealt directly with Europeans. However, the native tribes were in sufficient contact that by the time that Lewis and Clark entered North Dakota in 1804, they were aware of the French and then Spanish claims to their territory.
    Much of present-day North Dakota was included in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803; the remainder was acquired in the Treaty of 1818. The acquired land was organized into Minnesota and Nebraska Territories. Dakota Territory, making up present-day North Dakota and South Dakota, along with parts of present-day Wyoming and Montana, was organized on March 2, 1861.
    Dakota Territory was settled sparsely until the late 19th century, when the railroads entered the region and aggressively marketed the land. An omnibus bill for statehood for North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Washington titled the Enabling Act of 1889 was passed on February 22, 1889 during the administration of Grover Cleveland. After Cleveland left office, it was left to his successor, Benjamin Harrison, to sign proclamations formally admitting North Dakota and South Dakota to the Union on November 2, 1889.
    The rivalry between the two new states presented a dilemma of which was to be admitted first. Harrison directed Secretary of State James G. Blaine to shuffle the papers and obscure from him which he was signing first and the actual order went unrecorded, thus no one knows which of the Dakotas was admitted first. However, since North Dakota alphabetically appears before South Dakota, its proclamation was published first in the Statutes At Large. Since that day, it has become common to list the Dakotas alphabetically and thus North Dakota is usually listed as the 39th state.
    Unrest among wheat farmers, especially among Norwegians, led to a radical political movement after World War I centered in the Non Partisan League (“NPL”). The NPL, which eventually merged into the Democratic Party, attempted to insulate North Dakota from the power of out-of-state banks and corporations. In addition to founding the state-owned Bank of North Dakota and North Dakota Mill and Elevator (both still in existence), the NPL established a state-owned railroad line (later sold to the Soo Line Railroad). Anti-corporate laws were passed that virtually prohibited a corporation or bank from owning title to land zoned as farmland. These laws, still in force today, after having been upheld by both state and federal courts, make it almost impossible to foreclose on farmland, as even after foreclosure, the property title cannot be held by a bank or mortgage company.
    A round of federal construction projects began in the 1950s, including the Garrison Dam and the Minot and Grand Forks Air Force bases. There was a boom in oil exploration in western North Dakota in the 1980s, as rising petroleum prices made development profitable. The original North Dakota State Capitol burned to the ground on December 28, 1930, and was replaced by a limestone faced art deco skyscraper that still stands today.
    In recent years the state has had a strong economy, with unemployment lower than the national average and strong job and population growth. Much of the growth has been based on development of the Bakken oil fields in the western part of the state. Estimates as to the remaining amount of oil vary, with some estimating over 100 years worth of oil remaining in the area.

    Population

    The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of North Dakota was 699,628 on July 1, 2012, a 4.02% increase since the 2010 United States Census. This makes North Dakota the U.S. state with the largest percentage in population growth since 2011.
    From fewer than 2,000 people in 1870, North Dakota’s population grew to near 680,000 by 1930. Growth then slowed, and the population has fluctuated slightly over the past seven decades, hitting a low of 617,761 in the 1970 census, with a total of 642,200 in the 2000 census. The United States Census Bureau, as of July 1, 2008, estimated North Dakota’s population at 641,481, which represents a decrease of 714, or 0.1%, since the last census in 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 20,460 people (that is 67,788 births minus 47,328 deaths) and a decrease due to net migration of 17,787 people out of the state.
    Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 3,323 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of 21,110 people. Of the residents of North Dakota, 69.8% were born in North Dakota, 27.2% were born in a different state, 0.6% were born in Puerto Rico, U.S. Island areas, or born abroad to American parent(s), and 2.4% were born in another country. The age and gender distributions approximate the national average. Except for Native Americans, the North Dakota population has a lesser percentage of minorities than in the nation as a whole. As of 2011, 20.7% of North Dakota’s population younger than age 1 were minorities. The center of population of North Dakota is located in Wells County, near Sykeston.

    Economy

    Agriculture is the largest industry in North Dakota, although petroleum, food processing, and technology are also major industries. The economy of North Dakota had a gross domestic product of $24 billion in 2005. The per capita income in 2006 was $33,034, ranked 29th in the nation. The three-year median household income from 2002-2004 was $39,594, ranking 37th in the U.S. North Dakota is also the only state with a state owned bank, the Bank of North Dakota in Bismarck, and a state owned flour mill, the North Dakota Mill and Elevator in Grand Forks. Fargo is home to the second largest campus of Microsoft with 1,700 employees, and Amazon.com employs several hundred in Grand Forks.
    As of September 2010, the state’s unemployment rate is the lowest in the nation at 3.7% and it has not touched 5 percent since 1987. At end of 2010, the state per capita income was ranked 17th in the nation, the biggest increase of any state in a decade from rank 38th. The reduction in the unemployment rate and growth in per capita income is attributable to the oil boom in the state. Due to a combination of oil related development and investing in technology & service industries, North Dakota has had a budget surplus every year after the 2008 market crash.

    Agriculture

    North Dakota’s earliest industries were fur trading and agriculture. Although less than 10% of the population is employed in the agricultural sector, it remains a major part of the state’s economy, ranking 9th in the nation in the value of crops and 18th in total value of agricultural products sold. The share of people employed in agriculture is comparatively high: As of 2008, only approximately 2-3 percent of the population of the United States is directly employed in agriculture. North Dakota has about 90% of its land area in farms with 27,500,000 acres (111,000 km2) of cropland, the third largest in the nation. Between 2002 and 2007 total cropland increased by about one million acres (4,000 km2), the only state showing an increase. Over the same period, 1,800,000 acres (7,300 km2) were shifted into soybean and corn production, the largest such shift in the United States.
    The state is the largest producer in the U.S. of many cereal grains including barley (36% of U.S. crop), durum wheat (58%), hard red spring wheat (48%), oats (17%), and combined wheat of all types (15%). It is the second leading producer of buckwheat (20%). As of 2007, corn became the state’s largest crop produced, although only 2% of U.S. production. The Corn Belt extends to North Dakota, but is situated more on the edge of the region instead if in its center. Corn yields are high in the southeast part of the state and smaller in other parts of the state. Most of the cereal grains are grown for livestock feed.
    The state is the leading producer of many oilseeds including 92% of the U.S. canola crop, 94% of flax seed, 53% of sunflower seeds, 18% of safflower seeds, and 62% of mustard seed. Canola is suited to the cold winters and it matures fast. Processing of canola for oil production produces canola meal as a by-product. The by-product is a high-protein animal feed. Soybeans are also an increasingly important crop with 400,000 acres (1,600 km2) additional planted between 2002 and 2007. Soybeans are a major crop in the eastern part of the state and cultivation is common in the southeast part of the state. Soybeans were not grown in North Dakota in the 1940s, but it has become more common in the last 50 years and especially since 1998. In North Dakota soybeans have to mature fast, because of the comparatively short growing season. Soybeans are grown for livestock feed.
    North Dakota is the second leading producer of sugarbeets, grown in the Red River Valley. The state is also the largest producer of honey, dry edible peas and beans, lentils, and the third largest producer of potatoes.
    North Dakota’s economy is aided by nearly $1 billion in federal agricultural subsidies annually.

    Energy

    The energy industry is a major contributor to the economy. North Dakota has both coal and oil reserves. Shale gas is also produced. Lignite coal reserves in Western North Dakota are used to generate about 90% of the electricity consumed, and electricity is also exported to nearby states. North Dakota has the second largest lignite coal production in the U.S. However, lignite coal is the lowest grade coal. There are larger and higher grade coal reserves (anthracite, bituminous coal and subbituminous coal) in other U.S. states.
    Oil was discovered near Tioga in 1951, generating 53 million barrels (8,400,000 m3) of oil a year by 1984. Recoverable oil reserves have jumped dramatically recently. The oil reserves of the Bakken Formation may hold up to 400 billion barrels (6.4×1010 m3) of oil, 25 times larger than the reserves in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. However, a report issued in April 2008 by the U.S. Geological Survey estimates that the oil recoverable by current technology in the Bakken formation is two orders of magnitude less, in the range of 3 billion barrels (480×106 m3) to 4.3 billion barrels (680×106 m3), with a mean of 3.65 billion barrels (580×106 m3). North-Western North Dakota is currently in an oil boom: the Williston, Tioga, Stanley and Minot-Burlington communities are experiencing rapid growth. As of 2012, the state is the 2nd largest oil producer in the U.S. with an average of 575,490 barrels per day.
    The Great Plains region, which includes the state of North Dakota has been referred to as “the Saudi Arabia of wind energy.” Wind energy in North Dakota is also very cost effective because the state has large rural expanses and wind speeds seldom go below 10 mph.

    Tourism

    North Dakota is considered the least visited state, owing, in part, to its not having a major tourist attraction. Areas popular with visitors include Theodore Roosevelt National Park in the western part of the state. The park often exceeds 475,000 visitors each year. Regular events in the state that attract tourists include Norsk Hostfest in Minot, billed as North America’s largest Scandinavian festival; the Medora Musical; and the North Dakota State Fair.

    Medicine

    North Dakota is the only US state that legally demands its pharmacies to have 51% shares owned by pharmacists. For this reason many national drug chains are unable to fill prescriptions in their stores.

    Taxes

    North Dakota has a slightly progressive income tax structure; the five brackets of state income tax rates are 2.1%, 3.92% 4.34%, 5.04%, and 5.54% as of 2004. In 2005 North Dakota ranked 22nd highest by per capita state taxes. The sales tax in North Dakota is 5% for most items. The state allows municipalities to institute local sales taxes and special local taxes, such as the 1.75% supplemental sales tax in Grand Forks. Excise taxes are levied on the purchase price or market value of aircraft registered in North Dakota. The state imposes a use tax on items purchased elsewhere but used within North Dakota. Owners of real property in North Dakota pay property tax to their county, municipality, school district, and special taxing districts.
    The Tax Foundation ranks North Dakota as the state with the 20th most “business friendly” tax climate in the nation. Tax Freedom Day arrives on April 1, 10 days earlier than the national Tax Freedom Day. In 2006, North Dakota was the state with the lowest number of returns filed by taxpayers with an Adjusted Gross Income of over $1M.