Find Location on Map

Phone Answering Service in Oregon

Need Help?
Request a call back!
Map DataMap data ©2013 GoogleTerms of Use
Map Data
Map data ©2013 Google
Map data ©2013 Google

    • 1 to 3 days

      Portland

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • PORTLAND

  • ADAMS

  • ADEL

  • ADRIAN

  • AGNESS

  • ALBANY

  • ALLEGANY

  • ALSEA

  • ALVADORE

  • AMITY

  • ANTELOPE

  • ARCH CAPE

  • ARLINGTON

  • AROCK

  • ASHLAND

  • ASHWOOD

  • ASTORIA

  • ATHENA

  • AUMSVILLE

  • AURORA

  • AZALEA

  • BAKER CITY

  • BANDON

  • BANKS

  • BATES

  • BAY CITY

  • BEATTY

  • BEAVER

  • BEAVERCREEK

  • BEAVERTON

  • BEND

  • BLACHLY

  • BLODGETT

  • BLUE RIVER

  • BLY

  • BOARDMAN

  • BONANZA

  • BORING

  • BRIDAL VEIL

  • BRIDGEPORT

  • BRIGHTWOOD

  • BROADBENT

  • BROGAN

  • BROOKINGS

  • BROTHERS

  • BROWNSVILLE

  • BURNS

  • BUTTE FALLS

  • BUXTON

  • CAMAS VALLEY

  • CAMP SHERMAN

  • CANBY

  • CANNON BEACH

  • CANYON CITY

  • CANYONVILLE

  • CARLTON

  • CASCADE LOCKS

  • CASCADIA

  • CAVE JUNCTION

  • CENTRAL POINT

  • CHEMULT

  • CHESHIRE

  • CHILOQUIN

  • CHRISTMAS VALLEY

  • CLACKAMAS

  • CLATSKANIE

  • CLOVERDALE

  • COLTON

  • COLUMBIA CITY

  • CONDON

  • COOS BAY

  • COQUILLE

  • CORBETT

  • CORNELIUS

  • CORVALLIS

  • COTTAGE GROVE

  • COVE

  • CRABTREE

  • CRANE

  • CRATER LAKE

  • CRAWFORDSVILLE

  • CRESCENT

  • CRESCENT LAKE

  • CRESWELL

  • CULP CREEK

  • CULVER

  • CURTIN

  • DAIRY

  • DALLAS

  • DAMASCUS

  • DAYS CREEK

  • DAYTON

  • DAYVILLE

  • DEADWOOD

  • DEER ISLAND

  • DEPOE BAY

  • DETROIT

  • DEXTER

  • DIAMOND

  • DILLARD

  • DONALD

  • DORENA

  • DRAIN

  • DREWSEY

  • DUFUR

  • DUNDEE

  • DURKEE

  • EAGLE CREEK

  • EAGLE POINT

  • ECHO

  • EDDYVILLE

  • ELGIN

  • ELKTON

  • ELMIRA

  • ENTERPRISE

  • ESTACADA

  • EUGENE

  • FAIRVIEW

  • FALL CREEK

  • FALLS CITY

  • FIELDS

  • FLORENCE

  • FOREST GROVE

  • FORT KLAMATH

  • FORT ROCK

  • FOSSIL

  • FOSTER

  • FRENCHGLEN

  • GALES CREEK

  • GARDINER

  • GARIBALDI

  • GASTON

  • GATES

  • GERVAIS

  • GILCHRIST

  • GLADSTONE

  • GLENDALE

  • GLENEDEN BEACH

  • GLIDE

  • GOLD BEACH

  • GOLD HILL

  • GOVERNMENT CAMP

  • GRAND RONDE

  • GRANTS PASS

  • GRASS VALLEY

  • GRESHAM

  • HAINES

  • HALFWAY

  • HALSEY

  • HAMMOND

  • HAPPY VALLEY

  • HARPER

  • HARRISBURG

  • HEBO

  • HELIX

  • HEPPNER

  • HEREFORD

  • HERMISTON

  • HILLSBORO

  • HINES

  • HOOD RIVER

  • HUBBARD

  • HUNTINGTON

  • IDANHA

  • IDLEYLD PARK

  • IMBLER

  • IMNAHA

  • INDEPENDENCE

  • IONE

  • IRONSIDE

  • IRRIGON

  • JACKSONVILLE

  • JAMIESON

  • JEFFERSON

  • JOHN DAY

  • JORDAN VALLEY

  • JOSEPH

  • JUNCTION CITY

  • JUNTURA

  • KEIZER

  • KENO

  • KENT

  • KERBY

  • KIMBERLY

  • KLAMATH FALLS

  • LA GRANDE

  • LA PINE

  • LAFAYETTE

  • LAKE OSWEGO

  • LAKESIDE

  • LAKEVIEW

  • LANGLOIS

  • LEBANON

  • LEXINGTON

  • LINCOLN CITY

  • LOGSDEN

  • LONG CREEK

  • LORANE

  • LOSTINE

  • LOWELL

  • LYONS

  • MADRAS

  • MALIN

  • MANNING

  • MANZANITA

  • MAPLETON

  • MARCOLA

  • MARYLHURST

  • MAUPIN

  • MCMINNVILLE

  • MEACHAM

  • MEDFORD

  • MEHAMA

  • MERLIN

  • MERRILL

  • MIDLAND

  • MIKKALO

  • MILL CITY

  • MILTON FREEWATER

  • MITCHELL

  • MOLALLA

  • MONMOUTH

  • MONROE

  • MONUMENT

  • MORO

  • MOSIER

  • MOUNT ANGEL

  • MOUNT HOOD PARKDALE

  • MOUNT VERNON

  • MULINO

  • MURPHY

  • MYRTLE CREEK

  • MYRTLE POINT

  • NEHALEM

  • NEOTSU

  • NESKOWIN

  • NETARTS

  • NEW PINE CREEK

  • NEWBERG

  • NEWPORT

  • NORTH BEND

  • NORTH PLAINS

  • NORTH POWDER

  • NOTI

  • NYSSA

  • O BRIEN

  • OAKLAND

  • OAKRIDGE

  • OCEANSIDE

  • ODELL

  • ONTARIO

  • OPHIR

  • OREGON CITY

  • OTIS

  • OTTER ROCK

  • OXBOW

  • PACIFIC CITY

  • PAISLEY

  • PAULINA

  • PENDLETON

  • PHILOMATH

  • PHOENIX

  • PILOT ROCK

  • PLEASANT HILL

  • PLUSH

  • PORT ORFORD

  • POST

  • POWELL BUTTE

  • POWERS

  • PRAIRIE CITY

  • PRINCETON

  • PRINEVILLE

  • PROSPECT

  • RAINIER

  • REDMOND

  • REEDSPORT

  • RHODODENDRON

  • RICHLAND

  • RICKREALL

  • RIDDLE

  • RILEY

  • RIVERSIDE

  • ROCKAWAY BEACH

  • ROGUE RIVER

  • ROSE LODGE

  • ROSEBURG

  • RUFUS

  • SAINT BENEDICT

  • SAINT HELENS

  • SAINT PAUL

  • SALEM

  • SANDY

  • SCAPPOOSE

  • SCIO

  • SCOTTS MILLS

  • SCOTTSBURG

  • SEAL ROCK

  • SEASIDE

  • SELMA

  • SENECA

  • SHADY COVE

  • SHANIKO

  • SHEDD

  • SHERIDAN

  • SHERWOOD

  • SILETZ

  • SILVER LAKE

  • SILVERTON

  • SISTERS

  • SIXES

  • SOUTH BEACH

  • SPRAGUE RIVER

  • SPRAY

  • SPRINGFIELD

  • STANFIELD

  • STAYTON

  • SUBLIMITY

  • SUMMER LAKE

  • SUMMERVILLE

  • SUMPTER

  • SUTHERLIN

  • SWEET HOME

  • SWISSHOME

  • TALENT

  • TANGENT

  • TENMILE

  • TERREBONNE

  • THE DALLES

  • THURSTON

  • TIDEWATER

  • TILLAMOOK

  • TILLER

  • TIMBER

  • TOLEDO

  • TOLOVANA PARK

  • TRAIL

  • TROUTDALE

  • TUALATIN

  • TURNER

  • TYGH VALLEY

  • UKIAH

  • UMATILLA

  • UMPQUA

  • UNION

  • UNITY

  • VALE

  • VENETA

  • VERNONIA

  • VIDA

  • WALDPORT

  • WALLOWA

  • WALTERVILLE

  • WALTON

  • WARM SPRINGS

  • WARREN

  • WARRENTON

  • WASCO

  • WEDDERBURN

  • WELCHES

  • WEST LINN

  • WESTFALL

  • WESTFIR

  • WESTLAKE

  • WESTON

  • WHEELER

  • WHITE CITY

  • WILBUR

  • WILDERVILLE

  • WILLAMINA

  • WILLIAMS

  • WILSONVILLE

  • WINCHESTER

  • WINSTON

  • WOLF CREEK

  • WOODBURN

  • YACHATS

  • YAMHILL

  • YONCALLA
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in Oregon?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in Oregon. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in Oregon?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in Oregon. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in Oregon?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in Oregon. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of Oregon

    Oregon is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is located on the Pacific coast, with Washington to the north, California to the south, Nevada on the southeast and Idaho to the east. The Columbia and Snake rivers delineate much of Oregon’s northern and eastern boundaries, respectively. The area was inhabited by many indigenous tribes before the arrival of traders, explorers, and settlers who formed an autonomous government in Oregon Country in 1843. The Oregon Territory was created in 1848, and Oregon became the 33rd state on February 14, 1859.
    Oregon is the 9th most extensive and the 27th most populous of the 50 United States. Salem is the state’s capital and third-most-populous city; Portland is the most populous. Portland is the 29th-largest U.S. city, with a population of 593,820 (2011 estimate) and a metro population of 2,262,605 (2011 estimate), the 23rd-largest U.S. metro area. The valley of the Willamette River in western Oregon is the state’s most densely populated area and is home to eight of the ten most populous cities.
    Oregon contains a diverse landscape including the windswept Pacific coastline, the volcanoes of the rugged and glaciated Cascade Mountain Range, many waterfalls (including Multnomah Falls), dense evergreen forests, mixed forests and deciduous forests at lower elevations, and high desert across much of the eastern portion of the state, extending into the Great Basin. The tall Douglas firs and redwoods along the rainy Western Oregon coast contrast with the lower density and fire-prone pine tree and juniper forests covering portions of the eastern half of the state. Alder trees are common in the west and fix nitrogen for the conifers; aspen groves are common in eastern Oregon. Stretching east from Central Oregon, the state also includes semi-arid shrublands, prairies, deserts, steppes, and meadows. Mount Hood is the highest point in the state at 11,249 feet (3,429 m). Crater Lake National Park is the only national park in Oregon.

    Etymology
    The earliest known use of the name, spelled Ouragon, was in a 1765 petition by Major Robert Rogers to the Kingdom of Great Britain. The term referred to the then-mythical River of the West (the Columbia River). By 1778 the spelling had shifted to Oregon.] In his 1765 petition, Rogers wrote:]
    “The rout is from the Great Lakes towards the Head of the Mississippi, and from thence to the River called by the Indians Ouragon…”
    One theory is the name comes from the French word ouragan (“windstorm” or “hurricane”), which was applied to the River of the West based on Native American tales of powerful Chinook winds of the lower Columbia River, or perhaps from firsthand French experience with the chinook winds of the Great Plains. At the time, the River of the West was thought to rise in western Minnesota and flow west through the Great Plains.
    Joaquin Miller explained in Sunset (magazine) in 1904 how Oregon’s name was derived:
    “The name, Oregon, is rounded down phonetically, from Aure il agua-Oragua, Or-a-gon, Oregon-given probably by the same Portuguese navigator that named the Farallones after his first officer, and it literally, in a large way, means cascades: ‘Hear the waters.’ You should steam up the Columbia and hear and feel the waters falling out of the clouds of Mount Hood to understand entirely the full meaning of the name Aure il agua, Oregon.”
    Another account, endorsed as the “most plausible explanation” in the book Oregon Geographic Names, was advanced by George R. Stewart in a 1944 article in American Speech. According to Stewart, the name came from an engraver’s error in a French map published in the early 18th century, on which the Ouisiconsink (Wisconsin) River was spelled “Ouaricon-sint,” broken on two lines with the -sint below, so there appeared to be a river flowing to the west named “Ouaricon.”
    According to the Oregon Tourism Commission (also known as Travel Oregon), present-day Oregonians /??r?’go?ni?nz/ pronounce the state’s name as “OR-UH-GUN, never OR-EE-GONE.”]
    After being drafted by the Detroit Lions in 2002, former Oregon Ducks quarterback Joey Harrington distributed “ORYGUN” stickers to members of the media as a reminder of how to pronounce the name of his home state. The stickers are sold by the University of Oregon Bookstore, which credits the spelling as a joke that is meant “for Oregonians and Oregon fans everywhere who get a kick out of this hilarious mispronunciation of our state.”

    History

    Humans have inhabited the area that is now Oregon for at least 15,000 years. In recorded history, mentions of the land date to as early as the 16th century. During the 18th and 19th centuries, European powers – and later the United States – quarreled over possession of the region until 1846 when the U.S. and Great Britain finalized division of the region. Oregon became a state in 1859 and is now home to over 3.8 million residents.
    Human habitation of the Pacific Northwest began at least 15,000 years ago, with the oldest evidence of habitation in Oregon found at Fort Rock Cave and the Paisley Caves in Lake County. Archaeologist Luther Cressman dated material from Fort Rock to 13,200 years ago. By 8000 B.C. there were settlements throughout the state, with populations concentrated along the lower Columbia River, in the western valleys, and around coastal estuaries.
    By the 16th century, Oregon was home to many Native American groups, including the Coquille (Ko-Kwell), Bannock, Chasta, Chinook, Kalapuya, Klamath, Molalla, Nez Perce, Takelma, and Umpqua.

    European exploration

    The first Europeans to visit Oregon were Spanish explorers led by Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo who sighted southern Oregon off the Pacific Coast in 1543. In 1592, Juan de Fuca undertook detailed mapping and ocean current studies. Stops along these trips included Oregon as well as the strait now bearing his name and the future emplacement of Vancouver (Washington). Exploration was retaken routinely in 1774, starting by the expedition of frigate Santiago by Juan Jose Perez Hernandez (see Spanish expeditions to the Pacific Northwest), and the coast of Oregon became a valuable trading route to Asia. In 1778, British captain James Cook also explored the coast. French Canadian and metis trappers and missionaries arrived in the eastern part of the state in the late 18th century and early 19th century, many having travelled as members of Lewis and Clark and the 1811 Astor expeditions.
    Some stayed permanently, including Etienne Lussier, believed to be the first European farmer in the state of Oregon. The evidence of this French Canadian presence can be found in the numerous names of French origin in that part of the state: Charbonneau, Malheur Lake and River, Grande Ronde and Des Chutes Rivers, cities of La Grande, Ontario, etc.

    During U.S. westward expansion

    See also: History of the United States (1789-1849) and Oregon pioneer history
    The Lewis and Clark Expedition traveled through the region also in search of the Northwest Passage. They built their winter fort in 1805-06 at Fort Clatsop, near the mouth of the Columbia River. British explorer David Thompson also conducted overland exploration.
    In 1811, David Thompson, of the North West Company, became the first European to navigate the entire Columbia River. Stopping on the way, at the junction of the Snake River, he posted a claim to the region for Great Britain and the North West Company. Upon returning to Montreal, he publicized the abundance of fur-bearing animals in the area.
    Also in 1811, New Yorker John Jacob Astor financed the establishment of Fort Astoria at the mouth of the Columbia River as a western outpost to his Pacific Fur Company; this was the first permanent European settlement in Oregon.
    In the War of 1812, the British gained control of all Pacific Fur Company posts. The Treaty of 1818 established joint British and American occupancy of the region west of the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. By the 1820s and 1830s, the Hudson’s Bay Company dominated the Pacific Northwest from its Columbia District headquarters at Fort Vancouver (built in 1825 by the District’s Chief Factor John McLoughlin across the Columbia from present-day Portland).
    In 1841, the expert trapper and entrepreneur Ewing Young died leaving considerable wealth and no apparent heir, and no system to probate his estate. A meeting followed Young’s funeral at which a probate government was proposed. Doctor Ira Babcock of Jason Lee’s Methodist Mission was elected Supreme Judge. Babcock chaired two meetings in 1842 at Champoeg, (half way between Lee’s mission and Oregon City), to discuss wolves and other animals of contemporary concern. These meetings were precursors to an all-citizen meeting in 1843, which instituted a provisional government headed by an executive committee made up of David Hill, Alanson Beers, and Joseph Gale. This government was the first acting public government of the Oregon Country before annexation by the government of the United States.
    Also in 1841, Sir George Simpson, Governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company, reversed the Hudson’s Bay Company’s long-standing policy of discouraging settlement because it interfered with the lucrative fur trade. He directed that some 200 Red River Colony settlers be relocated to HBC farms near Fort Vancouver, (the James Sinclair expedition), in an attempt to hold Columbia District.
    Starting in 1842-1843, the Oregon Trail brought many new American settlers to Oregon Country. For some time, it seemed that Britain and the United States would go to war for a third time in 75 years (see Oregon boundary dispute), but the border was defined peacefully in 1846 by the Oregon Treaty. The border between the United States and British North America was set at the 49th parallel. The Oregon Territory was officially organized in 1848.
    Settlement increased with the Donation Land Claim Act of 1850 and the forced relocation of the native population to Indian reservations in Oregon.

    After statehood

    Oregon was admitted to the Union on February 14, 1859. Founded as a refuge from disputes over slavery, Oregon had a “whites only” clause in its original state Constitution.
    At the outbreak of the American Civil War, regular U.S. troops were withdrawn and sent east. Volunteer cavalry recruited in California were sent north to Oregon to keep peace and protect the populace. The First Oregon Cavalry served until June 1865.
    In the 1880s, the growth of railroads helped market the state’s lumber, wheat, and the rapid growth of its cities.

    20th and 21st centuries

    In 1902, Oregon introduced direct legislation by the state’s citizens through initiatives and referenda, known as the Oregon System. Oregon state ballots often include politically conservative proposals side-by-side with politically liberal ones, illustrating the diversity of political thought in the state.
    Industrial expansion began in earnest following the 1933-1937 construction of the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. Hydroelectric power, food, and lumber provided by Oregon helped fuel the development of the West, although the periodic fluctuations in the U.S. building industry have hurt the state’s economy on multiple occasions.

    Climate

    Oregon’s climate – particularly in the western part of the state – is heavily influenced by the Pacific Ocean. The climate is mild, but periods of extreme hot and cold can affect parts of the state. Oregon’s population centers, which lie mostly in the western part of the state, are moist and mild, while the lightly populated high deserts of Central and Eastern Oregon are much drier. Oregon’s highest recorded temperature is 119 °F (48 °C) at Pendleton on August 10, 1898, and the lowest recorded temperature is -54 °F (-48 °C) at Seneca on February 10, 1933.

    Economy

    Agriculture

    Land in the Willamette Valley owes its fertility to the Missoula Floods, which deposited lake sediment from Glacial Lake Missoula in western Montana onto the valley floor.
    Oregon is also one of four major world hazelnut growing regions, and produces 95% of the domestic hazelnuts in the United States. While the history of the wine production in Oregon can be traced to before Prohibition, it became a significant industry beginning in the 1970s. In 2005, Oregon ranked third among U.S. states with 303 wineries. Due to regional similarities in climate and soil, the grapes planted in Oregon are often the same varieties found in the French regions of Alsace and Burgundy.
    In the Southern Oregon coast commercially cultivated cranberries account for about 7 percent of U.S. production, and the cranberry ranks twenty-third among Oregon’s top fifty agricultural commodities. From 2006 to 2008, Oregon growers harvested between forty and forty-nine million pounds of berries every year. Cranberry cultivation in Oregon uses about 27,000 acres in southern Coos and northern Curry counties, centered around the coastal city of Bandon, Oregon.
    In the northeastern region of the state, particularly around Pendleton, both irrigated and dry land wheat is grown. Oregon farmers and ranchers also produce cattle, sheep, dairy products, eggs and poultry.
    [edit]Forestry and fisheries
    Vast forests have historically made Oregon one of the nation’s major timber production and logging states, but forest fires (such as the Tillamook Burn), over-harvesting, and lawsuits over the proper management of the extensive federal forest holdings have reduced the timber produced. According to the Oregon Forest Resources Institute, between 1989 and 2001 the amount of timber harvested from federal lands dropped some 96%, from 4,333 million to 173 million board feet (10,000,000 to 408,000 m3), although harvest levels on private land have remained relatively constant.
    Even the shift in recent years towards finished goods such as paper and building materials has not slowed the decline of the timber industry in the state. The effects of this decline have included Weyerhaeuser’s acquisition of Portland-based Willamette Industries in January 2002, the relocation of Louisiana-Pacific’s corporate headquarters from Portland to Nashville, and the decline of former lumber company towns such as Gilchrist. Despite these changes, Oregon still leads the United States in softwood lumber production; in 2001, 6,056 million board feet (14,000,000 m3) was produced in Oregon, compared with 4,257 million board feet (10,050,000 m3) in Washington, 2,731 million board feet (6,444,000 m3) in California, 2,413 million board feet (5,694,000 m3) in Georgia, and 2,327 million board feet (5,491,000 m3) in Mississippi. The slow of the timber and lumber industry has caused high unemployment rates in rural areas.
    Oregon has one of the largest salmon-fishing industries in the world, although ocean fisheries have reduced the river fisheries in recent years. See also the List of freshwater fishes of Oregon.

    Tourism

    Tourism is also a strong industry in the state. Oregon’s mountains, forests, waterfalls, lakes (including Crater Lake National Park), and beaches draw visitors year round. The Oregon Shakespeare Festival, held in Ashland, is a tourist draw for Southern Oregon.Oregon is home to many breweries and Portland has the largest number of breweries of any city in the world.
    Oregon occasionally hosts film shoots. Movies filmed in Oregon include: Animal House, Free Willy, The General, The Goonies, Kindergarten Cop, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, and Stand By Me. Oregon native Matt Groening, creator of The Simpsons, has incorporated many references from his hometown of Portland into the TV series.

    Technology

    High technology industries and services have been a major employer since the 1970s. Tektronix was the largest private employer in Oregon until the late 1980s. Intel’s creation and expansion of several facilities in eastern Washington County continued the growth that Tektronix had started. Intel, the state’s largest for-profit private employer, operates four large facilities, with Ronler Acres, Jones Farm and Hawthorn Farm all located in Hillsboro.
    The spinoffs and startups that were produced by these two companies led to the establishment in that area of the so-called Silicon Forest. The recession and dot-com bust of 2001 hit the region hard; many high technology employers reduced the number of their employees or went out of business. Open Source Development Labs made news in 2004 when they hired Linus Torvalds, developer of the Linux kernel. Recently, biotechnology giant Genentech purchased several acres of land in Hillsboro to expand its production capabilities. Oregon is home to several large datacenters that take advantage of cheap power and a climate in Central Oregon conducive to reducing cooling costs. Google has a large datacenter in The Dalles; Facebook has built a large datacenter in Prineville; and Amazon is restarting construction of a datacenter in Boardman.

    Corporate headquarters

    Oregon is also the home of large corporations in other industries. The world headquarters of Nike, Inc. are located near Beaverton. Medford is home to Harry and David, which sells gift items under several brands. Medford is also home to the national headquarters of the Fortune 1000 company, Lithia Motors. Portland is home to one of the West’s largest trade book publishing houses, Graphic Arts Center Publishing. Oregon is also home to Mentor Graphics Corporation, a world leader in electronic design automation (EDA) located in Wilsonville and employs roughly 4,500 people worldwide.

    Employment

    As of September 2012, the state’s unemployment rate is 8.7%. Oregon’s largest for-profit employer is Intel, located in the Silicon Forest area on Portland’s west side. Intel was the largest employer in Oregon until 2008. As of January 2009, the largest employer in Oregon is Providence Health & Services, a non-profit.

    Taxes and budgets

    Oregon’s biennial state budget, $42.4 billion as of 2007, comprises General Funds, Federal Funds, Lottery Funds, and Other Funds. Personal income taxes account for 88% of the General Fund’s projected funds. The Lottery Fund, which has grown steadily since the lottery was approved in 1984, exceeded expectations in the 2007 fiscal years, at $604 million.
    Oregon is one of only five states that have no sales tax. Oregon voters have been resolute in their opposition to a sales tax, voting proposals down each of the nine times they have been presented. The last vote, for 1993’s Measure 1, was defeated by a 72-24% margin.
    The state also has a minimum corporate tax of only $10 a year, amounting to 5.6% of the General Fund in the 2005-2007 biennium; data about which businesses pay the minimum is not available to the public. As a result, the state relies on property and income taxes for its revenue. Oregon has the fifth highest personal income tax in the nation. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Oregon ranked 41st out of the 50 states in taxes per capita in 2005. The average paid of $1,791.45 is higher than only nine other states.
    Some local governments levy sales taxes on services: the city of Ashland, for example, collects a 5% sales tax on prepared food.
    Oregon is one of six states with a revenue limit. The “kicker law” stipulates that when income tax collections exceed state economists’ estimates by 2% or more, any excess must be returned to taxpayers. Since the enactment of the law in 1979, refunds have been issued for seven of the eleven biennia. In 2000, Ballot Measure 86 converted the “kicker” law from statute to the Oregon Constitution, and changed some of its provisions.
    Federal payments to county governments, which were granted to replace timber revenue when logging in National Forests was restricted in the 1990s, have been under threat of suspension for several years. This issue dominates the future revenue of rural counties, which have come to rely on the payments in providing essential services.
    55 percent of state revenues are spent on public education, 23% on human services (child protective services, Medicaid, and senior services), 17% on public safety, and 5% on other services.

    Population

    The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Oregon was 3,899,353 on July 1, 2012, a 1.8% increase since the 2010 United States Census.]
    As of the census of 2010, Oregon has a population of 3,831,074, which is an increase of 409,675, or 12%, since the year 2000. The population density is 39.9 persons per square mile. There are 1,675,562 housing units, a 15.3% increase over 2000. Among them, 90.7% are occupied.
    Hispanics or Latinos make up 11.7% of the total population. Among those who are not Hispanic or Latino, 78.5% is “white alone,” 1.7% is “black or African American alone,” 1.1% is “American Indian or Alaska native alone,” 3.6% is “Asian alone,” 0.3% is “Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander alone,” 0.1% is “another race alone,” and 2.9% is multiracial.
    The state’s most populous ethnic group, non-Hispanic white, has declined from 95.8% in 1970 to 78.1% in 2011. As of 2011, 38.7% of Oregon’s children under the age of 1 belonged to minority groups.
    Of the state’s total population, 22.6% was under age 18, and 77.4% were 18 or older.
    The center of population of Oregon is located in Linn County, in the city of Lyons. More than 57% of the state’s population lives in the Portland metropolitan area.
    As of 2004, Oregon’s population included 309,700 foreign-born residents (accounting for 8.7% of the state population).The largest reported ancestry groups in Oregon are: German (22.5%), English (14.0%), Irish (13.2%), Scandinavian (8.4%) and American (5.0%). Approximately 62% of Oregon residents are wholly or partly of English, Welsh, Irish or Scottish ancestry. Most Oregon counties are inhabited principally by residents of Northwestern-European ancestry. Concentrations of Mexican-Americans are highest in Malheur and Jefferson counties.
    The majority of the diversity in Oregon is in the Portland metropolitan area.