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Phone Answering Service in South Carolina

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    • 1 to 3 days

      Charleston

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

    • 1 to 3 days

      Columbia

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • COLUMBIA

  • CHARLESTON

  • ABBEVILLE

  • ADAMS RUN

  • AIKEN

  • ALCOLU

  • ALLENDALE

  • ANDERSON

  • ANDREWS

  • ARCADIA

  • AWENDAW

  • AYNOR

  • BALLENTINE

  • BAMBERG

  • BARNWELL

  • BATESBURG

  • BATH

  • BEAUFORT

  • BEECH ISLAND

  • BELTON

  • BENNETTSVILLE

  • BETHERA

  • BETHUNE

  • BISHOPVILLE

  • BLACKSBURG

  • BLACKSTOCK

  • BLACKVILLE

  • BLAIR

  • BLENHEIM

  • BLUFFTON

  • BLYTHEWOOD

  • BOILING SPRINGS

  • BONNEAU

  • BOWLING GREEN

  • BOWMAN

  • BRADLEY

  • BRANCHVILLE

  • BRUNSON

  • BUFFALO

  • CADES

  • CALHOUN FALLS

  • CAMDEN

  • CAMERON

  • CAMPOBELLO

  • CANADYS

  • CARLISLE

  • CASSATT

  • CATAWBA

  • CAYCE

  • CENTENARY

  • CENTRAL

  • CHAPIN

  • CHAPPELLS

  • CHARLESTON AFB

  • CHERAW

  • CHESNEE

  • CHESTER

  • CHESTERFIELD

  • CLARKS HILL

  • CLEARWATER

  • CLEMSON

  • CLEVELAND

  • CLIFTON

  • CLINTON

  • CLIO

  • CLOVER

  • CONESTEE

  • CONVERSE

  • CONWAY

  • COOSAWHATCHIE

  • COPE

  • CORDESVILLE

  • CORDOVA

  • COTTAGEVILLE

  • COWARD

  • COWPENS

  • CROCKETVILLE

  • CROSS

  • CROSS ANCHOR

  • CROSS HILL

  • DALE

  • DALZELL

  • DARLINGTON

  • DAUFUSKIE ISLAND

  • DAVIS STATION

  • DENMARK

  • DILLON

  • DONALDS

  • DORCHESTER

  • DRAYTON

  • DUE WEST

  • DUNCAN

  • EARLY BRANCH

  • EASLEY

  • EASTOVER

  • EDGEFIELD

  • EDGEMOOR

  • EDISTO ISLAND

  • EFFINGHAM

  • EHRHARDT

  • ELGIN

  • ELKO

  • ELLIOTT

  • ELLOREE

  • ENOREE

  • ESTILL

  • EUTAWVILLE

  • FAIR PLAY

  • FAIRFAX

  • FAIRFOREST

  • FINGERVILLE

  • FLORENCE

  • FOLLY BEACH

  • FORK

  • FORT LAWN

  • FORT MILL

  • FOUNTAIN INN

  • FURMAN

  • GABLE

  • GADSDEN

  • GAFFNEY

  • GALIVANTS FERRY

  • GARNETT

  • GASTON

  • GEORGETOWN

  • GIFFORD

  • GILBERT

  • GLENDALE

  • GLOVERVILLE

  • GOOSE CREEK

  • GRAMLING

  • GRANITEVILLE

  • GRAY COURT

  • GREAT FALLS

  • GREELEYVILLE

  • GREEN POND

  • GREEN SEA

  • GREENVILLE

  • GREENWOOD

  • GREER

  • GRESHAM

  • GROVER

  • HAMER

  • HAMPTON

  • HANAHAN

  • HARDEEVILLE

  • HARLEYVILLE

  • HARTSVILLE

  • HEATH SPRINGS

  • HEMINGWAY

  • HICKORY GROVE

  • HILDA

  • HILTON HEAD ISLAND

  • HODGES

  • HOLLY HILL

  • HOLLYWOOD

  • HONEA PATH

  • HOPKINS

  • HORATIO

  • HUGER

  • INMAN

  • IRMO

  • ISLANDTON

  • ISLE OF PALMS

  • IVA

  • JACKSON

  • JACKSONBORO

  • JAMESTOWN

  • JEFFERSON

  • JENKINSVILLE

  • JOANNA

  • JOHNS ISLAND

  • JOHNSONVILLE

  • JOHNSTON

  • JONESVILLE

  • KERSHAW

  • KINARDS

  • KINGSTREE

  • LA FRANCE

  • LADSON

  • LADYS ISLAND

  • LAKE CITY

  • LAKE VIEW

  • LAMAR

  • LANCASTER

  • LANDO

  • LANDRUM

  • LANE

  • LANGLEY

  • LATTA

  • LAURENS

  • LEESVILLE

  • LEXINGTON

  • LIBERTY

  • LIBERTY HILL

  • LITTLE MOUNTAIN

  • LITTLE RIVER

  • LITTLE ROCK

  • LOBECO

  • LOCKHART

  • LODGE

  • LONG CREEK

  • LONGS

  • LORIS

  • LOWNDESVILLE

  • LUGOFF

  • LURAY

  • LYDIA

  • LYMAN

  • LYNCHBURG

  • MANNING

  • MARIETTA

  • MARION

  • MARTIN

  • MAULDIN

  • MAYESVILLE

  • MAYO

  • MC BEE

  • MC CLELLANVILLE

  • MC COLL

  • MC CONNELLS

  • MC CORMICK

  • MILEY

  • MINTURN

  • MODOC

  • MONCKS CORNER

  • MONETTA

  • MONTMORENCI

  • MOORE

  • MOUNT CARMEL

  • MOUNT CROGHAN

  • MOUNT PLEASANT

  • MOUNTAIN REST

  • MOUNTVILLE

  • MULLINS

  • MURRELLS INLET

  • MYRTLE BEACH

  • NEESES

  • NESMITH

  • NEW ELLENTON

  • NEW ZION

  • NEWBERRY

  • NEWRY

  • NICHOLS

  • NINETY SIX

  • NORRIS

  • NORTH

  • NORTH AUGUSTA

  • NORTH CHARLESTON

  • NORTH MYRTLE BEACH

  • NORWAY

  • OKATIE

  • OLANTA

  • OLAR

  • ORANGEBURG

  • PACOLET

  • PACOLET MILLS

  • PAGELAND

  • PAMPLICO

  • PARKSVILLE

  • PATRICK

  • PAULINE

  • PAWLEYS ISLAND

  • PEAK

  • PELION

  • PELZER

  • PENDLETON

  • PICKENS

  • PIEDMONT

  • PINELAND

  • PINEVILLE

  • PINEWOOD

  • PINOPOLIS

  • PLUM BRANCH

  • POMARIA

  • PORT ROYAL

  • PROSPERITY

  • RAINS

  • RAVENEL

  • REEVESVILLE

  • REIDVILLE

  • REMBERT

  • RICHBURG

  • RICHLAND

  • RIDGE SPRING

  • RIDGELAND

  • RIDGEVILLE

  • RIDGEWAY

  • RION

  • ROCK HILL

  • ROEBUCK

  • ROUND O

  • ROWESVILLE

  • RUBY

  • RUFFIN

  • RUSSELLVILLE

  • SAINT GEORGE

  • SAINT HELENA ISLAND

  • SAINT MATTHEWS

  • SAINT STEPHEN

  • SALEM

  • SALLEY

  • SALTERS

  • SALUDA

  • SANDY SPRINGS

  • SANTEE

  • SARDINIA

  • SCOTIA

  • SCRANTON

  • SEABROOK

  • SELLERS

  • SENECA

  • SHARON

  • SHAW A F B

  • SHELDON

  • SILVERSTREET

  • SIMPSONVILLE

  • SIX MILE

  • SLATER

  • SMOAKS

  • SMYRNA

  • SOCIETY HILL

  • SPARTANBURG

  • SPRINGFIELD

  • STARR

  • STARTEX

  • STATE PARK

  • SULLIVANS ISLAND

  • SUMMERTON

  • SUMMERVILLE

  • SUMTER

  • SUNSET

  • SWANSEA

  • SYCAMORE

  • TAMASSEE

  • TATUM

  • TAYLORS

  • TIGERVILLE

  • TILLMAN

  • TIMMONSVILLE

  • TOWNVILLE

  • TRAVELERS REST

  • TRENTON

  • TROY

  • TURBEVILLE

  • ULMER

  • UNA

  • UNION

  • VAN WYCK

  • VANCE

  • VARNVILLE

  • VAUCLUSE

  • WADMALAW ISLAND

  • WAGENER

  • WALHALLA

  • WALLACE

  • WALTERBORO

  • WARD

  • WARE SHOALS

  • WARRENVILLE

  • WATERLOO

  • WEDGEFIELD

  • WELLFORD

  • WEST COLUMBIA

  • WEST UNION

  • WESTMINSTER

  • WESTVILLE

  • WHITE ROCK

  • WHITE STONE

  • WHITMIRE

  • WILLIAMS

  • WILLIAMSTON

  • WILLISTON

  • WINDSOR

  • WINNSBORO

  • WOODRUFF

  • YEMASSEE

  • YORK
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in South Carolina?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in South Carolina. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in South Carolina?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in South Carolina. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in South Carolina?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in South Carolina. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of South Carolina

    South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina; to the south and west by Georgia, located across the Savannah River; and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. Originally part of the Province of Carolina, the Province of South Carolina was the first of the 13 colonies that declared independence from the British Crown during the American Revolution. The colony was originally named by King Charles II of England in honor of his father Charles I (Carolus being Latin for Charles). South Carolina was the first state to ratify the Articles of Confederation, the 8th state to ratify the US Constitution on May 23, 1788. South Carolina later became the first state to vote to secede from the Union which it did on December 20, 1860. It was readmitted to the United States on June 25, 1868.
    South Carolina is the 40th most extensive and the 24th most populous of the 50 United States. South Carolina comprises 46 counties. The capital and largest city of the state is Columbia.

    Geography

    South Carolina is composed of five geographic areas, or physiographic provinces, whose boundaries roughly parallel the Atlantic coastline. In the southeast part of the state is the Coastal Plain, which can be divided into the Outer and Inner Coastal Plains. From north to south the coast is divided into three separate areas, the Grand Strand, the Santee River Delta, and the Sea Islands. Further inland are the Sandhills, ancient dunes from what used to be South Carolina’s coast millions of years ago. The Fall Line, which marks the limit of navigable rivers, runs along the boundary of the Sandhills and the Piedmont, which has rolling hills and clay soils. In the northwest corner of the state are the Blue Ridge Mountains, the smallest geographical region in the state.
    The state’s coastline contains many salt marshes and estuaries, as well as natural ports such as Georgetown and Charleston. An unusual feature of the coastal plain is a large number of Carolina bays, the origins of which are uncertain. The bays tend to be oval, lining up in a northwest to southeast orientation. The terrain is flat and the soil is composed entirely of recent sediments such as sand, silt, and clay. Areas with better drainage make excellent farmland, though some land is swampy. The natural areas of the coastal plain are part of the Middle Atlantic coastal forests ecoregion.
    Just west of the coastal plain is the Sandhills region. The Sandhills are remnants of coastal dunes from a time when the land was sunken or the oceans were higher.
    The Piedmont (Upstate) region contains the roots of an ancient, eroded mountain chain. It is generally hilly, with thin, stony clay soils, and contains few areas suitable for farming. Much of the Piedmont was once farmed, with little success. It is now reforested. These forests are part of the Southeastern mixed forests ecoregion. At the southeastern edge of the Piedmont is the fall line, where rivers drop to the coastal plain. The fall line was an important early source of water power. Mills built to harness this resource encouraged the growth of several cities, including the capital, Columbia. The larger rivers are navigable up to the fall line, providing a trade route for mill towns.
    The northwestern part of the Piedmont is also known as the Foothills. The Cherokee Parkway is a scenic driving route through this area. This is where Table Rock State Park is located.
    Highest in elevation is the Blue Ridge Region, containing an escarpment of the Blue Ridge Mountains, which continue into North Carolina and Georgia, as part of the southern Appalachian chain. Sassafras Mountain, South Carolina’s highest point at 3,560 feet (1,090 m) is located in this area. Also located in this area is Caesars Head State Park. The environment here is that of the Appalachian-Blue Ridge forests ecoregion. The Savannah River, located on the border between South Carolina and Georgia, is a favorite whitewater rafting destination.

    Climate

    South Carolina has a humid subtropical climate (Koppen climate classification Cfa), although high elevation areas in the “Upstate” or “Upcountry” area have less subtropical characteristics than areas on the Atlantic coastline. In the summer, South Carolina is hot and humid with daytime temperatures averaging between 86-93 °F (30-34 °C) in most of the state and overnight lows averaging 70-74 °F (21-23 °C) on the coast and from 66-73 °F (19-23 °C) inland. Winter temperatures are much less uniform in South Carolina. Coastal areas of the state have very mild winters with high temperatures approaching an average of 60 °F (16 °C) and overnight lows in the 40s°F (5-8 °C). Inland, the average January overnight low is around 32 °F (0 °C) in Columbia and temperatures well below freezing in the Upstate. While precipitation is abundant the entire year in almost the entire state, the coast tends to have a slightly wetter summer, while inland, March tends to be the wettest month and winter being the driest season, with November being the driest month. The highest recorded temperature is 113 °F (45 °C) in Johnston and Columbia on June 29, 2012 and the lowest recorded temperature is -19 °F (-28 °C) at Caesars Head on January 21, 1985.
    Snowfall in South Carolina is somewhat uncommon in most of the state, while coastal areas receive less than an inch (2.5 cm) annually on average. It is not uncommon for areas along the coast (especially the southern coast) to receive no recordable snowfall in a given year. The interior receives a little more snow, although nowhere in the state averages more than 12 inches (30 cm) of snow annually. The mountains of extreme northwestern South Carolina tend to have the most substantial snow accumulation. Freezing rain and ice tend to be more common than snow and even rain in many areas of the state. Road bridges in South Carolina are commonly marked, “Bridge ices before road.”

    History

    Early years

    The colony of Carolina was settled by British settlers, mostly from Barbados. King Charles gave eight aristocrats a royal charter to settle Carolina (Carolina is Latin for “Charles land”) because earlier they had helped him regain his throne. Parts of Carolina (mostly the coastal areas) were colonized earlier by Spain (see Fort Caroline), but battles between the Spanish and the Native Americans caused the Spanish people to retreat to Florida, Cuba, Mexico, and Central and South America. Carolina was settled to make profit from trade and also by selling land. John Locke, an English philosopher, wrote a constitution for the colony that covered topics such as land divisions and social rankings. In the early years, not many people bought land there, so the proprietors lowered the price on some portions.
    Carolina did not develop as planned. It split into northern and southern Carolina, creating two different colonies. It separated because of political reasons as the settlers wanted political power. In 1719 settlers in southern Carolina seized control from its proprietors. Then, in 1729, Carolina became two royal colonies- North Carolina and South Carolina. Farmers from inland Virginia settled northern Carolina. They grew tobacco, and sold timber and tar, both categories of naval supplies needed by England. The northern Carolina coast lacked a good harbor, so many of the farmers used Virginia’s ports to conduct their trade.
    Southern Carolina prospered from the fertility of the Low Country and the harbors, such as that at Charles Town (later Charleston). Settlements spread, and trade in deerskin, lumber, and beef thrived. Rice cultivation was developed on a large scale with the help of skills and techniques of slaves imported from rice-growing regions of Africa. They created the large earthworks of dams and canals required to irrigate the rice fields. In addition, indigo became a commodity crop, also developed with the skills of African slaves. The cultivation and processing of indigo, a blue flowering plant, was developed here by a young English woman, Eliza Lucas, a planter’s daughter who had come with her father, also a military officer, from the Caribbean. She took over managing the plantation when he was assigned elsewhere. Indigo became an important commodity crop for the dyeing of textiles. Slave labor was integral to the economic success of rice and indigo as commodity crops. In South Carolina, the number of slaves exceeded those of Anglo-European colonists by the time of the Revolution, a characteristic of the state through the American Civil War.

    The American Revolution

    On March 26, 1776, the colony adopted the Constitution of South Carolina becoming the first republic in America. John Rutledge was elected as the state’s first president. He was succeeded by Rawlins Lowndes who served March 6, 1778 – January 9, 1779. On February 5, 1778, South Carolina became the first state to ratify the Articles of Confederation, the initial governing document of the United States. However, in 1780, South Carolinian loyalists to the British crown helped British troops recapture South Carolina from the previously successful rebels. On January 17, 1781, the Battle of Cowpens won by the American forces, marked the beginning of the decline in British fortunes. In 1782 they decided to evacuate their troops by the end of the year. Thousands of Loyalists and slaves left with them.
    The current United States Constitution was proposed for adoption by the States on September 17, 1787, and South Carolina was the 8th state to ratify it, on May 23, 1788.
    The American Revolution caused a shock to slavery in the South. Many thousands of slaves fled to British authorities to obtain freedom; and many of those left with the British in the last days of the war. Others secured their freedom by escaping to perceived friendlier locations during the turmoil. Estimates are that 25,000 slaves (30% of those in South Carolina) fled, migrated or died during the disruption of the war.

    The Federal Period

    South Carolina politics between 1783 and 1795 were marred by rivalry between a Federalist elite supporting the central government in Philadelphia and a large proportion of common people. The latter were often members of ‘Republican Societies’, and they supported the Republican-Democrats, headed by Jefferson and Madison. This party wanted more democracy in the US, especially in South Carolina.
    Most people supported the French Revolution (1789-1795), as the French had been allies and they were proud of their own revolution. Charleston was one of the most French-influenced cities in the USA. Leading South Carolina figures, such as governors Charles Pinckney and William Moultrie, backed with money and actions the French plans to further their political, strategic, and commercial goals in North America. This pro-French stance and attitude of South Carolina ended soon because of the XYZ Affair.

    Antebellum

    Antebellum South Carolina did more to advance nullification and secession than any other Southern state. Their first attempt at nullification was in 1822 following a slave rebellion led by Denmark Vesey. The state responded by passing a Negro Seamen Act, later declared unconstitutional by Supreme Court Justice William Johnson. His ruling was not enforced. In 1832, a South Carolina state convention passed the Ordinance of Nullification, declaring the Federal tariff laws of 1828 and 1832 unconstitutional, null and not to be enforced in the state of South Carolina after February 1, 1833. This led to the Nullification Crisis, in which U.S. President Andrew Jackson received congressional authorization, through the Force Bill, to use whatever military force necessary to enforce Federal law in the state. This was the first U.S. legislation denying individual states the right to secede. As a result of Jackson’s threat of force, the South Carolina state convention was re-convened and repealed the Ordinance of Nullification in March.
    Anti-abolitionist feelings ran strong in South Carolina. In 1856, South Carolina congressman Preston Brooks entered the United States Senate chamber and, with a metal-tipped cane, beat Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner. He drew blood and injured Sumner badly enough that the latter was unable to serve for several months. Brooks was retaliating for a speech Sumner had just given in which he attacked slavery and insulted South Carolinians. Brooks resigned his seat but received a hero’s welcome on returning home.

    The Civil War

    On December 20, 1860, when it became clear that Abraham Lincoln would be the next president, South Carolina became the first state to declare its secession from the Union. On April 12, 1861, Confederate batteries began shelling Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, and the American Civil War began. The Union Navy effectively blockaded Charleston and seized the Sea Islands. Planters had taken their families (and sometimes slaves) to points inland for refuge.
    The Union Army set up an experiment in freedom for the ex-slaves, in which they started education and farmed land for themselves. South Carolina troops participated in major Confederate campaigns, but no major battles were fought inland. General William Tecumseh Sherman marched through the state in early 1865, destroying numerous plantations, and captured the state capital of Columbia on February 17. Fires began that night and by next morning, most of the central city was destroyed. South Carolina suffered 18,666 military deaths during the Civil War, which was nearly one-third of the white male population of fighting age.

    Reconstruction

    After the war, South Carolina was restored to the United States during Reconstruction. Under presidential Reconstruction (1865-66), freedmen (former slaves) were given limited rights. Under Radical reconstruction (1867-1877), a Republican coalition of freedmen, carpetbaggers and scalawags was in control, supported by Union Army forces. The withdrawal of Union soldiers as part of the Compromise of 1877 ended Reconstruction. White Democrats used paramilitary groups such as the Red Shirts to intimidate and terrorize black voters. They regained political control of the state under conservative white “Redeemers” and pro-business Bourbon Democrats.
    Until the 1868 presidential election, South Carolina’s legislature, not the voters, chose the state’s electors for the presidential election. South Carolina was the last state to choose its electors in this manner. On October 19, 1871 President Ulysses S. Grant suspended habeas corpus in nine South Carolina counties under the authority of the Ku Klux Klan Act. Led by Grant’s Attorney General Amos T. Akerman, hundreds of Klansmen were arrested while 2000 Klansmen fled the state. This was done in order to suppress Klan violence against African American and white voters in the South.

    20th century and beyond

    Early in the 20th century, South Carolina developed a thriving textile industry. The state also converted its agricultural base from cotton to more profitable crops, attracted large military bases, and created tourism industries. As the 21st century progresses, South Carolina attracts new business by having a 5% corporate income tax rate, no state property tax, no local income tax, no inventory tax, no sales tax on manufacturing equipment, industrial power or materials for finished products, no wholesale tax, no unitary tax on worldwide profits.
    Of extended controversy has been the state’s display of the flags of the Confederate States of America, which was raised on the state capitol in 1962. The state capitol is located directly next to the University of South Carolina campus, so the move was seen as a protest against the court-ordered desegregation of the schools. A lawsuit calling for the flag to be removed was filed in 1994. On July 1, 2000, South Carolina became the last state to remove the Confederate flag, placed there in 1962, during Democratic Governor Fritz Hollings term in office, from over its statehouse. The state Senate had approved a bill for its removal on April 12, 2000, by a margin of 36 to 7; the bill had specified that a Confederate flag be flown in front of the Capitol next to a monument honoring fallen Confederate soldiers. Debate was more heated in the state House of Representatives, which passed the bill on May 18, 2000, by a margin of only 66 to 43, after including a measure’s ensuring that the Confederate flag by the monument be 30 feet (9.1 m) high. The flag by the monument continues to fuel controversy. The NAACP maintains an economic boycott of the state of South Carolina. The NCAA refuses to allow South Carolina to host NCAA athletic events whose locations are determined in advance. On July 6, 2009, the Atlantic Coast Conference announced a decision to move three future baseball tournaments out of South Carolina, citing concerns by the NAACP over the continuing state-sponsored display of the Confederate flag.
    Starting January 1, 2013, South Carolina will be one of the first states that will no longer pay for early elective deliveries of babies for both Medicaid and private insurance. The term early elective is defined as an labor induction or caesarean section between 37-39 weeks with absolutely no medical reason at all. This change is intended to result in healthier babies and less needless costs for South Carolina.

    Economy

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, South Carolina’s gross state product in current dollars was $97 billion in 1997, and $153 billion in 2007. Its per-capita real gross domestic product (GDP) in chained 2000 dollars was $26,772 in 1997, and $28,894 in 2007; that represents 85% of the $31,619 per-capita real GDP for the United States overall in 1997, and 76% of the $38,020 for the U.S. in 2007.
    Major agricultural outputs of the state are: tobacco, poultry, cattle, dairy products, soybeans, hay, rice, and swine. Industrial outputs include: textile goods, chemical products, paper products, machinery, automobiles and automotive products and tourism. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of March 2012, South Carolina has 1,852,700 nonfarm jobs of which 12% are in manufacturing, 11.5% are in leisure and hospitality, 19% are in trade, transportation and utilities, and 11.8% are in education and health services. The service sector accounts for 83.7% of the South Carolina economy.
    During the economic downturn in the Late 2000s Recession, South Carolina’s Unemployment Rate peaked at 12.0% for November and December 2009. It is continuing a steady decline with an unemployment rate of 8.9% as of March 2012.
    Many large corporations have moved their locations to South Carolina. South Carolina is a right-to-work state and many businesses utilize staffing agencies to temporarily fill positions. This labor force is appealing to companies because of lower wages and no responsibility of maintaining healthcare benefits for its temporary employees. Domtar, located in Rock Hill is the only Fortune 500 company headquartered in South Carolina. The Fortune 1000 list includes SCANA, Sonoco Products and ScanSource.
    South Carolina also benefits from foreign investment. There are 1,950 foreign-owned firms operating in South Carolina employing almost 135,000 people. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) brought 1.06 billion dollars to the state economy in 2010. Since 1994, BMW has had a production facility in Spartanburg.