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Phone Answering Service in South Dakota

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    • 1 to 3 days

      Sioux Falls

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • SIOUX FALLS

  • ABERDEEN

  • AGAR

  • AKASKA

  • ALCESTER

  • ALEXANDRIA

  • ALLEN

  • ALPENA

  • AMHERST

  • ANDOVER

  • ARLINGTON

  • ARMOUR

  • ARTESIAN

  • ASHTON

  • ASTORIA

  • AURORA

  • AVON

  • BADGER

  • BALTIC

  • BARNARD

  • BATESLAND

  • BATH

  • BELLE FOURCHE

  • BELVIDERE

  • BERESFORD

  • BIG STONE CITY

  • BISON

  • BLACK HAWK

  • BLUNT

  • BONESTEEL

  • BOWDLE

  • BOX ELDER

  • BRADLEY

  • BRANDON

  • BRANDT

  • BRENTFORD

  • BRIDGEWATER

  • BRISTOL

  • BRITTON

  • BROOKINGS

  • BRUCE

  • BRYANT

  • BUFFALO

  • BUFFALO GAP

  • BULLHEAD

  • BURBANK

  • BURKE

  • CAMP CROOK

  • CANISTOTA

  • CANOVA

  • CANTON

  • CAPUTA

  • CARPENTER

  • CARTHAGE

  • CASTLEWOOD

  • CAVOUR

  • CENTERVILLE

  • CHAMBERLAIN

  • CHANCELLOR

  • CHERRY CREEK

  • CHESTER

  • CLAIRE CITY

  • CLAREMONT

  • CLARK

  • CLEAR LAKE

  • COLMAN

  • COLOME

  • COLTON

  • COLUMBIA

  • CONDE

  • CORONA

  • CORSICA

  • CRESBARD

  • CROOKS

  • CUSTER

  • DALLAS

  • DANTE

  • DAVIS

  • DE SMET

  • DEADWOOD

  • DELL RAPIDS

  • DELMONT

  • DIMOCK

  • DOLAND

  • DRAPER

  • DUPREE

  • EAGLE BUTTE

  • EDEN

  • EDGEMONT

  • EGAN

  • ELK POINT

  • ELKTON

  • ELLSWORTH AFB

  • EMERY

  • ENNING

  • ERWIN

  • ESTELLINE

  • ETHAN

  • EUREKA

  • FAIRBURN

  • FAIRFAX

  • FAIRVIEW

  • FAITH

  • FAULKTON

  • FEDORA

  • FERNEY

  • FLANDREAU

  • FLORENCE

  • FORT MEADE

  • FORT PIERRE

  • FORT THOMPSON

  • FRANKFORT

  • FREDERICK

  • FREEMAN

  • FULTON

  • GANN VALLEY

  • GARDEN CITY

  • GARRETSON

  • GARY

  • GAYVILLE

  • GEDDES

  • GETTYSBURG

  • GLENCROSS

  • GLENHAM

  • GOODWIN

  • GREGORY

  • GRENVILLE

  • GROTON

  • HAMILL

  • HARRISBURG

  • HARRISON

  • HARROLD

  • HARTFORD

  • HAYES

  • HAYTI

  • HAZEL

  • HECLA

  • HENRY

  • HERMOSA

  • HERREID

  • HERRICK

  • HIGHMORE

  • HILL CITY

  • HITCHCOCK

  • HOLABIRD

  • HOSMER

  • HOT SPRINGS

  • HOUGHTON

  • HOVEN

  • HOWARD

  • HOWES

  • HUDSON

  • HUMBOLDT

  • HURLEY

  • HURON

  • IDEAL

  • INTERIOR

  • IPSWICH

  • IRENE

  • IROQUOIS

  • ISABEL

  • JAVA

  • JEFFERSON

  • KADOKA

  • KAYLOR

  • KELDRON

  • KENNEBEC

  • KEYSTONE

  • KIMBALL

  • KRANZBURG

  • KYLE

  • LABOLT

  • LAKE ANDES

  • LAKE CITY

  • LAKE NORDEN

  • LAKE PRESTON

  • LANE

  • LANGFORD

  • LANTRY

  • LEAD

  • LEBANON

  • LEMMON

  • LENNOX

  • LEOLA

  • LESTERVILLE

  • LETCHER

  • LITTLE EAGLE

  • LODGEPOLE

  • LONG LAKE

  • LONG VALLEY

  • LOWER BRULE

  • LUDLOW

  • LYONS

  • MADISON

  • MANDERSON

  • MANSFIELD

  • MARION

  • MARTIN

  • MARTY

  • MARVIN

  • MC INTOSH

  • MC LAUGHLIN

  • MEADOW

  • MELLETTE

  • MENNO

  • MIDLAND

  • MILBANK

  • MILESVILLE

  • MILLER

  • MISSION

  • MISSION HILL

  • MITCHELL

  • MOBRIDGE

  • MONROE

  • MONTROSE

  • MORRISTOWN

  • MOUND CITY

  • MOUNT VERNON

  • MUD BUTTE

  • MURDO

  • NEMO

  • NEW EFFINGTON

  • NEW HOLLAND

  • NEW UNDERWOOD

  • NEWELL

  • NISLAND

  • NORRIS

  • NORTH SIOUX CITY

  • NORTHVILLE

  • NUNDA

  • OACOMA

  • OELRICHS

  • OGLALA

  • OKATON

  • OKREEK

  • OLDHAM

  • OLIVET

  • ONAKA

  • ONIDA

  • ORAL

  • ORIENT

  • ORTLEY

  • OWANKA

  • PARKER

  • PARKSTON

  • PARMELEE

  • PEEVER

  • PHILIP

  • PICKSTOWN

  • PIEDMONT

  • PIERPONT

  • PIERRE

  • PINE RIDGE

  • PLANKINTON

  • PLATTE

  • POLLOCK

  • PORCUPINE

  • PRAIRIE CITY

  • PRESHO

  • PRINGLE

  • PUKWANA

  • QUINN

  • RALPH

  • RAMONA

  • RAPID CITY

  • RAYMOND

  • REDFIELD

  • REDIG

  • REE HEIGHTS

  • RELIANCE

  • RENNER

  • REVA

  • REVILLO

  • RIDGEVIEW

  • ROCKHAM

  • ROSCOE

  • ROSEBUD

  • ROSHOLT

  • ROSLYN

  • ROWENA

  • RUTLAND

  • SAINT CHARLES

  • SAINT FRANCIS

  • SAINT LAWRENCE

  • SAINT ONGE

  • SALEM

  • SCENIC

  • SCOTLAND

  • SELBY

  • SENECA

  • SINAI

  • SISSETON

  • SMITHWICK

  • SOUTH SHORE

  • SPEARFISH

  • SPENCER

  • SPRINGFIELD

  • STEPHAN

  • STICKNEY

  • STOCKHOLM

  • STRANDBURG

  • STRATFORD

  • STURGIS

  • SUMMIT

  • TABOR

  • TEA

  • TIMBER LAKE

  • TOLSTOY

  • TORONTO

  • TRAIL CITY

  • TRENT

  • TRIPP

  • TULARE

  • TURTON

  • TUTHILL

  • TWIN BROOKS

  • TYNDALL

  • UNION CENTER

  • UTICA

  • VALE

  • VALLEY SPRINGS

  • VEBLEN

  • VERMILLION

  • VIBORG

  • VIENNA

  • VIRGIL

  • VIVIAN

  • VOLGA

  • VOLIN

  • WAGNER

  • WAKONDA

  • WAKPALA

  • WALKER

  • WALL

  • WALLACE

  • WANBLEE

  • WARNER

  • WASTA

  • WATAUGA

  • WATERTOWN

  • WAUBAY

  • WEBSTER

  • WENTWORTH

  • WESSINGTON

  • WESSINGTON SPRINGS

  • WESTPORT

  • WHITE

  • WHITE LAKE

  • WHITE OWL

  • WHITE RIVER

  • WHITEHORSE

  • WHITEWOOD

  • WILLOW LAKE

  • WILMOT

  • WINFRED

  • WINNER

  • WITTEN

  • WOLSEY

  • WOOD

  • WOONSOCKET

  • WORTHING

  • WOUNDED KNEE

  • YALE

  • YANKTON
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in South Dakota?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in South Dakota. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in South Dakota?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in South Dakota. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in South Dakota?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in South Dakota. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of South Dakota

    South Dakota is a state located in the Midwestern region of the United States. It is named after the Lakota and Dakota Sioux American Indian tribes. South Dakota is the 17th most extensive, but the 5th least populous and the 5th least densely populated of the 50 United States. Once the southern portion of the Dakota Territory, South Dakota became a state on November 2, 1889 simultaneously with North Dakota. Pierre is the state capital and Sioux Falls, with a population of 159,000, is South Dakota’s largest city.
    South Dakota is bordered by the states of North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Montana. The state is bisected by the Missouri River, dividing South Dakota into two geographically and socially distinct halves, known to residents as “East River” and “West River”. Eastern South Dakota is home to most of the state’s population, and fertile soil in this area is used to grow a variety of crops. West of the Missouri, ranching is the predominant agricultural activity, and the economy is more dependent on tourism and defense spending. The Black Hills, a group of low pine-covered mountains, is located in the southwest part of the state. The Black Hills are sacred to the Sioux. Mount Rushmore, a major tourist destination, is located there. Other attractions in the southwest include Badlands and Wind Cave national parks, Custer State Park, the Crazy Horse Memorial, and historic Deadwood. South Dakota experiences a temperate continental climate, with four distinct seasons and precipitation ranging from moderate in the east to semi-arid in the west. The ecology of the state features species typical of a North American grassland biome.
    Humans have inhabited the area for several millennia, with the Sioux becoming dominant by the early 19th century. In the late 19th century, European-American settlement intensified after a gold rush in the Black Hills and the construction of railroads from the east. Encroaching miners and settlers caused conflict that triggered a number of Indian wars, ending with the Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890. Key events in the 20th century included the Dust Bowl and Great Depression, increased federal spending during the 1940s and 50s for agriculture and defense, and an industrialization of agriculture which has much reduced family farming.
    While several Democratic senators have represented South Dakota for multiple terms at the federal level, the state government is largely dominated by the Republican Party, whose nominees have carried South Dakota in each of the most recent 12 presidential elections. Historically dominated by an agricultural economy and a rural lifestyle, South Dakota has recently sought to diversify its economy in areas, including biomedical research and alternative energy fuels, to attract and retain residents. South Dakota’s history and rural character still strongly influence the culture of the state.

    Geography

    South Dakota is situated in the north-central United States, and is considered a part of the Midwest by the U.S. Census Bureau; it is also part of the Great Plains region. The culture, economy, and geography of western South Dakota have more in common with the West than the Midwest. South Dakota has a total land area of 77,121 square miles (199,740 km2), making the state the 17th largest in the Union.
    Harney Peak, with an elevation of 7,242 ft (2,207 m), is the state’s highest point, while the shoreline of Big Stone Lake is the lowest, with an elevation of 966 ft (294 m). South Dakota is bordered to the north by North Dakota; to the south by Nebraska; to the east by Iowa and Minnesota; and to the west by Wyoming and Montana. The geographical center of the U.S. is 17 miles (27 km) west of Castle Rock in Butte County. The North American continental pole of inaccessibility is located between Allen and Kyle, 1,024 mi (1,648 km) from the nearest coastline.
    The Missouri River is the largest and longest river in the state. Other major South Dakota rivers include the Cheyenne, James, Big Sioux, and White Rivers. Eastern South Dakota has many natural lakes, mostly created by periods of glaciation. Additionally, dams on the Missouri River create four large reservoirs: Lake Oahe, Lake Sharpe, Lake Francis Case, and Lewis and Clark Lake.

    Regions and geology

    South Dakota can generally be divided into three regions: eastern South Dakota, western South Dakota, and the Black Hills. The Missouri River serves as a boundary in terms of geographic, social, and political differences between eastern and western South Dakota, and the geography of the Black Hills differs from its surroundings to such an extent that it can be considered separate from the rest of western South Dakota. South Dakotans also at times combine the Black Hills with the rest of western South Dakota, and refer to the two resulting regions, divided by the Missouri, as West River and East River.
    Eastern South Dakota generally features higher precipitation and lower topography than the western part of the state. Smaller geographic regions of this area include the Coteau des Prairies, the Dissected Till Plains, and the James River Valley. The Coteau des Prairies is a plateau bordered on the east by the Minnesota River Valley and on the west by the James River Basin. Further to the west, the James River Basin is mostly low, flat, highly eroded land, following the flow of the James River through South Dakota from north to south. The Dissected Till Plains, an area of rolling hills and fertile soil that covers much of Iowa and Nebraska, also extends into the southeastern corner of South Dakota. Layers deposited during the Pleistocene epoch, starting around two million years ago, cover most of eastern South Dakota. These are the youngest rock and sediment layers in the state, and are the product of several successive periods of glaciation which deposited a large amount of rocks and soil, known as till, over the area.
    The Great Plains cover most of the western two-thirds of South Dakota. West of the Missouri River the landscape becomes more arid and rugged, consisting of rolling hills, plains, ravines, and steep flat-topped hills called buttes. In the south, east of the Black Hills, lie the South Dakota Badlands. Erosion from the Black Hills, marine skeletons which fell to the bottom of a large shallow sea that once covered the area and volcanic material all contribute to the geology of this area.
    The Black Hills are in the southwestern part of South Dakota and extend into Wyoming. This range of low mountains covers 6,000 sq mi (16,000 km2) with peaks that rise from 2,000 to 4,000 feet (600 to 1,200 m) above their bases. The Black Hills are the location of Harney Peak (7,242 ft or 2,207 m above sea level), the highest point in South Dakota and also the highest point in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. Two billion-year-old Precambrian formations, the oldest rocks in the state, form the central core of the Black Hills. Formations from the Paleozoic Era form the outer ring of the Black Hills; these were created between roughly 540 and 250 million years ago. This area features rocks such as limestone which were deposited here when the area formed the shoreline of an ancient inland sea.

    Ecology

    Much of South Dakota, not including the Black Hills, is dominated by a temperate grasslands biome. Although grasses and crops cover most of this region, deciduous trees such as cottonwoods, elms, and willows are common near rivers and in shelter belts. Mammals in this area include bison, deer, pronghorn, coyotes, and prairie dogs. The state bird, the ring-necked pheasant, has adapted well to the area after being introduced from China, and growing populations of bald eagles are spread throughout the state, especially near the Missouri River. Rivers and lakes of the grasslands support populations of walleye, carp, pike, bass, and other species. The Missouri River also contains the pre-historic paddlefish.
    Because of higher elevation and precipitation, the Black Hills ecology differs significantly from that of the plains. The mountains are thickly blanketed by various types of pines, including ponderosa and lodgepole pines, as well as spruces. Black Hills mammals include deer, elk (wapiti), bighorn sheep, mountain goats, Pine Marten (Rare), and mountain lions, while the streams and lakes contain several species of trout.

    Climate

    South Dakota has a continental climate with four distinct seasons, ranging from cold, dry winters to hot and semi-humid summers. During the summers, the average high temperature throughout the state is often close to 90 °F (32 °C), although it cools to near 60 °F (15 °C) at night. It is not unusual for South Dakota to have severe hot, dry spells in the summer with the temperature climbing above 100 °F (38 °C) several times every year. Winters are cold with January high temperatures averaging below freezing and low temperatures averaging below 10 °F (- 12 °C) in most of the state. The highest recorded temperature is 120 °F (49 °C) at Usta on July 15, 2006 and the lowest recorded temperature is -58 °F (-50 °C) at McIntosh on February 17, 1936.
    Average annual precipitation in South Dakota ranges from semi-arid conditions in the northwestern part of the state (around 15 inches, or 381 mm) to semi-humid around the southeast portion of the state (around 25 inches, or 635 mm), although a small area centered on Lead in the Black Hills has the highest precipitation at nearly 30 inches (762 mm) a year.
    South Dakota summers bring frequent, sometimes severe, thunderstorms with high winds, thunder, and hail. The eastern part of the state is often considered part of Tornado Alley, and South Dakota experiences an average of 30 tornadoes each year. Severe weather in the form of blizzards and ice storms occur often during winter.

    History

    Humans have lived in what is today South Dakota for at least several thousand years. The first inhabitants were Paleoindian hunter-gatherers, and disappeared from the area around 5000 BC. Between 500 AD and 800 AD, a semi-nomadic people known as the Mound Builders lived in central and eastern South Dakota. In the 14th century, the Crow Creek Massacre occurred, in which several hundred men, women, and children were killed near the Missouri River.
    By 1500 the Arikara (or Ree) had settled in much of the Missouri River valley. European contact with the area began in 1743, when the LaVerendrye brothers explored the region. The LaVerendrye group buried a plate near the site of modern day Pierre, claiming the region for France as part of greater Louisiana. By the early 19th century, the Sioux had largely replaced the Arikara as the dominant group in the area.
    In 1803, the United States purchased the Louisiana Territory, an area that included most of South Dakota, from Napoleon Bonaparte, and President Thomas Jefferson organized a group commonly referred to as the “Lewis and Clark Expedition” to explore the newly acquired region. In 1817, an American fur trading post was set up at present-day Fort Pierre, beginning continuous American settlement of the area. In 1855, the U.S. Army bought Fort Pierre but abandoned it in 1857 in favor of Fort Randall to the south. Settlement by Americans and Europeans was by this time increasing rapidly, and in 1858 the Yankton Sioux signed the 1858 Treaty, ceding most of present-day eastern South Dakota to the United States.
    Land speculators founded two of eastern South Dakota’s largest present-day cities: Sioux Falls in 1856 and Yankton in 1859. In 1861, the Dakota Territory was established by the United States government (this initially included North Dakota, South Dakota, and parts of Montana and Wyoming). Settlement of the area, mostly by people from the eastern United States as well as western and northern Europe, increased rapidly, especially after the completion of an eastern railway link to Yankton in 1873.
    In 1874 gold was discovered in the Black Hills during a military expedition led by George A. Custer and miners and explorers began illegally entering land promised to the Lakota. Custer’s expedition took place despite the fact that the US had granted the entire western half of present-day South Dakota (West River) to the Sioux in 1868 by the Treaty of Laramie as part of the Great Sioux Reservation. The Sioux declined to grant mining rights or land in the Black Hills, and war broke out after the U.S. failed to stop white miners and settlers from entering the region. Eventually the US defeated the Sioux and broke up the Great Sioux Reservation into five reservations, settling the Lakota in those areas. (In 1980, the US Supreme Court and Congress ordered payment to the Lakota for the illegal seizure of the Black Hills. The case remains unsettled, as the Lakota refuse to accept the money and instead insist on the return of the land.)
    A growing population caused Dakota Territory to be divided in half and President Benjamin Harrison signed proclamations formally admitting both South Dakota and North Dakota to the union on November 2, 1889. Harrison had the papers shuffled to obscure which one was signed first and the order went unrecorded.
    On December 29, 1890, the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Commonly cited as the last major armed conflict between the United States and the Lakota Sioux Nation, the massacre resulted in the deaths of at least 146 Sioux, many of them women and children. 31 U.S. soldiers were also killed in the conflict.
    During the 1930s, several economic and climatic conditions combined with disastrous results for South Dakota. A lack of rainfall, extremely high temperatures and inappropriate cultivation techniques produced what was known as the Dust Bowl in South Dakota and several other plains states. Fertile topsoil was blown away in massive dust storms, and several harvests were completely ruined. The experiences of the Dust Bowl, coupled with local bank foreclosures and the general economic effects of the Great Depression, resulted in many South Dakotans leaving the state. The population of South Dakota declined by more than 7% between 1930 and 1940.
    Economic stability returned with the U.S. entry into World War II in 1941, when demand for the state’s agricultural and industrial products grew as the nation mobilized for war. In 1944, the Pick-Sloan Plan was passed as part of the Flood Control Act of 1944 by the U.S. Congress, resulting in the construction of six large dams on the Missouri River, four of which are at least partially located in South Dakota. Flood control, hydroelectricity, and recreational opportunities such as boating and fishing are provided by the dams and their reservoirs.
    In recent decades, South Dakota has been transformed from a state dominated by agriculture to one with a more diversified economy. The tourism industry has grown considerably since the completion of the interstate system in the 1960s, with the Black Hills becoming more important as a destination. The financial service industry began to grow in the state as well, with Citibank moving its credit card operations from New York to Sioux Falls in 1981, a move that has since been followed by several other financial companies. South Dakota was the first state to eliminate caps on interest rates.
    In 2007, the site of the recently closed Homestake gold mine near Lead was chosen as the location of a new underground research facility, the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. Despite a growing state population and recent economic development, many rural areas have been struggling over the past 50 years with locally declining populations and the emigration of educated young adults to larger South Dakota cities, such as Rapid City or Sioux Falls, or to other states. Mechanization and consolidation of agriculture has contributed greatly to the declining number of smaller family farms and the resulting economic and demographic challenges facing rural towns.

    Population

    The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of South Dakota was 833,354 on July 1, 2012, a 2.4% increase since the 2010 United States Census.
    Of the people residing in South Dakota, 65.7% were born in South Dakota, 31.4% were born in another US state, 0.6% were born in Puerto Rico, U.S. Island areas, or born abroad to American parent(s), and 2.3% were born in another country.
    According to the United States Census Bureau, as of 2012, South Dakota has an estimated population of 833,354, an increase of 19,174, or 2.4%, since the year 2010. 7.3% of South Dakota’s population was reported as under 5, 24% under 18, and 14.3% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 50.2% of the population. As of the 2000 census, South Dakota ranked fifth-lowest in the nation in both population and population density.
    The center of population of South Dakota is located in Buffalo County, in the unincorporated county seat of Gannvalley.

    Economy

    The current-dollar gross state product of South Dakota was US$39.8 billion as of 2010, the fifth smallest total state output in the US. The per capita personal income was $38,865 in 2010, ranked 25th in the U.S., and 12.5% of the population was below the poverty line in 2008. CNBC’s list of “Top States for Business for 2010” has recognized South Dakota as the seventh best state in the nation. In July 2011, the state’s unemployment rate was 4.7%.
    The service industry is the largest economic contributor in South Dakota. This sector includes the retail, finance, and health care industries. Citibank, which was the largest bank holding company in the United States at one time, established national banking operations in South Dakota in 1981 to take advantage of favorable banking regulations. Government spending is another important segment of the state’s economy, providing over ten percent of the gross state product. Ellsworth Air Force Base, near Rapid City, is the second-largest single employer in the state.
    Agriculture has historically been a key component of the South Dakota economy. Although other industries have expanded rapidly in recent decades, agricultural production is still very important to the state’s economy, especially in rural areas. The five most valuable agricultural products in South Dakota are cattle, corn (maize), soybeans, wheat, and hogs. Agriculture-related industries such as meat packing and ethanol production also have a considerable economic impact on the state. South Dakota is the sixth leading ethanol-producing state in the nation.
    Another important sector in South Dakota’s economy is tourism. Many travel to view the attractions of the state, particularly those in the Black Hills region, such as historic Deadwood, Mount Rushmore, and the nearby state and national parks. One of the largest tourist events in the state is the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. The five-day event drew over 450,000 attendants in 2006; significant considering the state has a population of only 790,000. In 2006, tourism provided an estimated 33,000 jobs in the state and contributed over two billion dollars to the economy of South Dakota.

    State taxes

    South Dakota is represented at the federal level by Senator Tim Johnson, Senator John Thune, and Representative Kristi Noem. Johnson is a Democrat and Thune and Noem are Republicans. South Dakota is one of seven states with only one seat in the US House of Representatives.2 American Indians have been becoming more active in state and county electoral politics. In the 2002 election, American Indian voting carried Tim Johnson as the Democratic candidate by a narrow margin.2
    In United States presidential elections, South Dakota is allotted three of 538 votes in the Electoral College.2 As in all other states except Maine and neighboring Nebraska, South Dakota’s electoral votes are granted in a winner-take-all system.