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Phone Answering Service in Vermont

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    • 1 to 3 days

      Burlington

      24/7 Voicemail Reception

      9 – 5 Live Answering

      24/7 Custom Solutions

      Starts at $20/month

  • BURLINGTON

  • ADAMANT

  • ALBANY

  • ALBURGH

  • ARLINGTON

  • ASCUTNEY

  • AVERILL

  • BAKERSFIELD

  • BARNARD

  • BARNET

  • BARRE

  • BARTON

  • BEEBE PLAIN

  • BEECHER FALLS

  • BELLOWS FALLS

  • BELMONT

  • BELVIDERE CENTER

  • BENNINGTON

  • BENSON

  • BETHEL

  • BOMOSEEN

  • BONDVILLE

  • BRADFORD

  • BRANDON

  • BRATTLEBORO

  • BRIDGEWATER

  • BRIDGEWATER CORNERS

  • BRIDPORT

  • BRISTOL

  • BROOKFIELD

  • BROWNSVILLE

  • CABOT

  • CALAIS

  • CAMBRIDGE

  • CAMBRIDGEPORT

  • CANAAN

  • CASTLETON

  • CAVENDISH

  • CENTER RUTLAND

  • CHARLOTTE

  • CHELSEA

  • CHESTER

  • CHESTER DEPOT

  • CHITTENDEN

  • COLCHESTER

  • CONCORD

  • CORINTH

  • COVENTRY

  • CRAFTSBURY

  • CRAFTSBURY COMMON

  • CUTTINGSVILLE

  • DANBY

  • DANVILLE

  • DERBY

  • DERBY LINE

  • DORSET

  • EAST ARLINGTON

  • EAST BARRE

  • EAST BERKSHIRE

  • EAST BURKE

  • EAST CALAIS

  • EAST CHARLESTON

  • EAST CORINTH

  • EAST DORSET

  • EAST DOVER

  • EAST FAIRFIELD

  • EAST HARDWICK

  • EAST HAVEN

  • EAST MIDDLEBURY

  • EAST MONTPELIER

  • EAST POULTNEY

  • EAST RANDOLPH

  • EAST RYEGATE

  • EAST SAINT JOHNSBURY

  • EAST THETFORD

  • EAST WALLINGFORD

  • EDEN

  • EDEN MILLS

  • ENOSBURG FALLS

  • ESSEX

  • ESSEX JUNCTION

  • FAIR HAVEN

  • FAIRFAX

  • FAIRFIELD

  • FAIRLEE

  • FERRISBURGH

  • FLORENCE

  • FOREST DALE

  • FRANKLIN

  • GAYSVILLE

  • GILMAN

  • GLOVER

  • GRAFTON

  • GRANBY

  • GRAND ISLE

  • GRANITEVILLE

  • GRANVILLE

  • GREENSBORO

  • GREENSBORO BEND

  • GROTON

  • GUILDHALL

  • HANCOCK

  • HARDWICK

  • HARTFORD

  • HARTLAND

  • HARTLAND FOUR CORNERS

  • HIGHGATE CENTER

  • HIGHGATE SPRINGS

  • HINESBURG

  • HUNTINGTON

  • HYDE PARK

  • HYDEVILLE

  • IRASBURG

  • ISLAND POND

  • ISLE LA MOTTE

  • JACKSONVILLE

  • JAMAICA

  • JEFFERSONVILLE

  • JERICHO

  • JOHNSON

  • JONESVILLE

  • KILLINGTON

  • LAKE ELMORE

  • LONDONDERRY

  • LOWELL

  • LOWER WATERFORD

  • LUDLOW

  • LUNENBURG

  • LYNDON

  • LYNDON CENTER

  • LYNDONVILLE

  • MANCHESTER

  • MANCHESTER CENTER

  • MARLBORO

  • MARSHFIELD

  • MC INDOE FALLS

  • MIDDLEBURY

  • MIDDLETOWN SPRINGS

  • MILTON

  • MONKTON

  • MONTGOMERY

  • MONTGOMERY CENTER

  • MONTPELIER

  • MORETOWN

  • MORGAN

  • MORRISVILLE

  • MOSCOW

  • MOUNT HOLLY

  • NEW HAVEN

  • NEWBURY

  • NEWFANE

  • NEWPORT

  • NEWPORT CENTER

  • NORTH BENNINGTON

  • NORTH CLARENDON

  • NORTH CONCORD

  • NORTH FERRISBURGH

  • NORTH HARTLAND

  • NORTH HERO

  • NORTH HYDE PARK

  • NORTH MONTPELIER

  • NORTH POMFRET

  • NORTH POWNAL

  • NORTH SPRINGFIELD

  • NORTH THETFORD

  • NORTH TROY

  • NORTHFIELD

  • NORTHFIELD FALLS

  • NORTON

  • NORWICH

  • ORLEANS

  • ORWELL

  • PASSUMPSIC

  • PAWLET

  • PEACHAM

  • PERKINSVILLE

  • PERU

  • PITTSFIELD

  • PITTSFORD

  • PLAINFIELD

  • PLYMOUTH

  • POST MILLS

  • POULTNEY

  • POWNAL

  • PROCTOR

  • PROCTORSVILLE

  • PUTNEY

  • QUECHEE

  • RANDOLPH

  • RANDOLPH CENTER

  • READING

  • READSBORO

  • RICHFORD

  • RICHMOND

  • RIPTON

  • ROCHESTER

  • ROXBURY

  • RUPERT

  • RUTLAND

  • SAINT ALBANS

  • SAINT ALBANS BAY

  • SAINT JOHNSBURY

  • SAINT JOHNSBURY CENTER

  • SALISBURY

  • SAXTONS RIVER

  • SHAFTSBURY

  • SHARON

  • SHEFFIELD

  • SHELBURNE

  • SHELDON

  • SHELDON SPRINGS

  • SHOREHAM

  • SOUTH BARRE

  • SOUTH BURLINGTON

  • SOUTH HERO

  • SOUTH LONDONDERRY

  • SOUTH NEWFANE

  • SOUTH POMFRET

  • SOUTH ROYALTON

  • SOUTH RYEGATE

  • SOUTH STRAFFORD

  • SOUTH WOODSTOCK

  • SPRINGFIELD

  • STAMFORD

  • STARKSBORO

  • STOCKBRIDGE

  • STOWE

  • STRAFFORD

  • SUTTON

  • SWANTON

  • TAFTSVILLE

  • THETFORD

  • THETFORD CENTER

  • TOPSHAM

  • TOWNSHEND

  • TROY

  • TUNBRIDGE

  • UNDERHILL

  • UNDERHILL CENTER

  • VERGENNES

  • VERNON

  • VERSHIRE

  • WAITSFIELD

  • WALLINGFORD

  • WARDSBORO

  • WARREN

  • WASHINGTON

  • WATERBURY

  • WATERBURY CENTER

  • WATERVILLE

  • WEBSTERVILLE

  • WELLS

  • WELLS RIVER

  • WEST BURKE

  • WEST CHARLESTON

  • WEST DANVILLE

  • WEST DOVER

  • WEST DUMMERSTON

  • WEST FAIRLEE

  • WEST GLOVER

  • WEST HALIFAX

  • WEST HARTFORD

  • WEST NEWBURY

  • WEST PAWLET

  • WEST RUPERT

  • WEST RUTLAND

  • WEST TOPSHAM

  • WEST TOWNSHEND

  • WEST WARDSBORO

  • WESTFIELD

  • WESTFORD

  • WESTMINSTER

  • WESTMINSTER STATION

  • WESTON

  • WHITE RIVER JUNCTION

  • WHITING

  • WHITINGHAM

  • WILDER

  • WILLIAMSTOWN

  • WILLIAMSVILLE

  • WILLISTON

  • WILMINGTON

  • WINDSOR

  • WINOOSKI

  • WOLCOTT

  • WOODBURY

  • WOODSTOCK

  • WORCESTER
  • Does Phone Answering USA provide Automated Reception Services in Vermont?

    Phone Answering USA provides Automated Reception Services in Vermont. This package is simple and cost effective. This package includes a local phone number, unlimited calls, unlimited local & long distance minutes (in the continental US), unlimited call forwarding and up to 7 extensions.

    This package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide Live 9am to 5pm Live Answering in Vermont?

    Phone Answering USA provides a Pay Per Call Live 9-5 Answering Service in Vermont. These call packages are designed for the company that does not need 24/7 phone answering and wishes to pay per call not per minute. It is a simple way to understand what your monthly cost will be month in and month out.

    Live 9am – 5pm Standard and Premium Package Differentiated:

    Standard Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ Live Message Receiving/ forwarding call to voice mail, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Premium Live Answering

    Calls personally answered/ screened/ forwarded per your instruction, allowing you to decide whether to accept the call, Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm local time (except holidays). $1 per call over allotted package.

    Find-Me / Follow-Me: Live efforts to forward your calls, allowing you to not miss that important call.

    Both Standard and Premium packages provide:

    • Off-hour automated reception with up to 7 extensions – Auto-attendant answering of calls in your company’s name with up to 3 dialing options for callers external client number(s). Unlimited Long Distance Continental U.S.
    • Custom greeting for Off-hours – Your company branding when your line is answered.
    • Flat Rate Monthly Call Bundles – You choose the amount of bundled calls monthly for your services and receive one-set price.
    • Local Number – Local Number that is uniquely yours while employing our services.
    • Voice-mail Message to Email – Receive Voice-mails to email and hear it as a .wav file, saving long-distance charges in lieu of calling in to check your messages.
    • Music on Hold – Callers hear music when on hold or while waiting to connect.
    • Text Message Notification to Cell Phone – Receive your messages taken live by receptionist and sent by text to your mobile phone.
    • Call Time Scheduler – Calls can be routed a certain way during business hours (9-5) and a different way after-hours.

    This Package can be purchased on our website or by calling 702.943.0315

    Does Phone Answering USA provide 24/7 Phone Answering services in Vermont?

    Phone Answering USA provides a suite of Phone Answering 24/7 Services in Vermont. All the service packages are custom to fit any companies’ needs.

    Categories:

    • Answering Services
    • Live Receptionist
    • Order Entry
    • Scheduling
    • Call Center
    • Help Desk

    24/7 Service Defined:

    • Absentee Reporting – Agents can answer your employee reporting line and document employee absences at a minimal cost of hiring full or part-time staff.
    • Ad Response – Agents can service and manage the responses to targeted advertising campaigns, website advertising, newspapers, radio, and direct mailings.
    • Answering Service – Experienced agents can answer your line 24/7; collect the information you require; and promptly forward it to you.
    • Directory Service – Provide your callers with the nearest location of your store, service center, or dealer.
    • Disaster Recovery Back-up – Prevent your phones from being unanswered during crisis by utilizing our answering service.
    • E-Mail Read & Response – Agents ca read and respond to your e-mail in a prompt and professional manner using your templates or scripted guidance.
    • Help Desk – Utilizing the information you provide, agents will answer your line and help the caller get the right information for their questions or concerns.
    • Insurance – Professional Agents will answer your line and collect the claims information you require.
    • Marketing Collateral Request Service – Professional agents will answer your line and record the name and address of the caller requesting your catalog, literature, or other information.
    • Medical Answering – Courteous Agents will provide answering for doctors, clinics, and hospitals. HIPAA compliant.
    • Order Entry – Professional agents can take orders for your products and services.
    • Overflow – Outsource your office phones to relieve overburdening your in-house resources.
    • Property Management Services – Agents can handle property inquiries and maintenance dispatching 24/7.
    • Scheduling – Agents will answer your line and schedule appointments and/or provide reminder follow-up calls. Agents can answer your line to schedule your seminar, class, conference, or event.

    These packages can be purchased by contact us through our website or calling 702.943.0315

    State of Vermont

    Vermont is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. Vermont is the 6th least extensive and the 2nd least populous of the 50 United States. It is the only New England state not bordering the Atlantic Ocean. Lake Champlain forms half of Vermont’s western border, which it shares with the state of New York. The Green Mountains are within the state. Vermont is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north.
    Originally inhabited by two major Native American tribes (the Algonquian-speaking Abenaki and the Iroquois), much of the territory that is now Vermont was claimed by France during its early colonial period. France ceded the territory to the Kingdom of Great Britain after being defeated in 1763 in the Seven Years’ War (also called the French and Indian War). For many years, the nearby colonies, especially New Hampshire and New York, disputed control of the area (then called the New Hampshire Grants). Settlers who held land titles granted by these colonies were opposed by the Green Mountain Boys militia, which eventually prevailed in creating an independent state, the Vermont Republic. Founded in 1777 during the Revolutionary War, the republic lasted for fourteen years. Setting aside the Thirteen Colonies, Vermont is one of only five U.S. states (along with Texas, Hawaii, California, and the briefly declared Republic of West Florida) to have been a sovereign state in its past. In 1791, Vermont joined the United States as the 14th state, the first outside the original 13 Colonies. It abolished slavery while still independent, and upon joining the Union became the first state to have done so.
    Vermont is the leading producer of maple syrup in the United States. The state capital is Montpelier, which has a population of 7,855 and is the least populated state capital in the country. Vermont’s most populous city is Burlington, with a 2010 population of 42,417, which makes it the least populous “largest city of a state” in the United States. Burlington’s metropolitan area is 211,261.

    Geography

    Vermont is located in the New England region in the eastern United States and comprises 9,614 square miles (24,900 km2), making it the 45th-largest state. It is the only state that does not have any buildings taller than 124 feet (38 m). Land comprises 9,250 square miles (24,000 km2) and water comprises 365 square miles (950 km2), making it the 43rd-largest in land area and the 47th in water area. In total area, it is larger than El Salvador and smaller than Haiti.
    The west bank of the Connecticut River marks the eastern (New Hampshire) border of the state (the river is part of New Hampshire). Lake Champlain, the major lake in Vermont, is the sixth-largest body of fresh water in the United States and separates Vermont from New York in the northwest portion of the state. From north to south, Vermont is 159 miles (256 km) long. Its greatest width, from east to west, is 89 miles (143 km) at the Canadian border; the narrowest width is 37 miles (60 km) at the Massachusetts line. The width averages 60.5 miles (97.4 km). The state’s geographic center is Washington, three miles (5 km) east of Roxbury. There are fifteen US federal border crossings between Vermont and Canada.
    The origin of the name “Vermont” is uncertain, but likely comes from the French les Verts Monts, meaning “the Green Mountains”. Thomas Young introduced it in 1777. Some authorities say that the mountains were called green because they were more forested than the higher White Mountains of New Hampshire and Adirondacks of New York; others say that the predominance of mica-quartz-chlorite schist, a green-hued metamorphosed shale, is the reason. The Green Mountain range forms a north-south spine running most of the length of the state, slightly west of its center. In the southwest portion of the state are the Taconic Mountains; the Granitic Mountains are in the northeast. In the northwest, near Lake Champlain, is the fertile Champlain Valley. In the south of the valley is Lake Bomoseen.
    Several mountains have timberlines with delicate year-round alpine ecosystems, including Mount Mansfield, the highest mountain in the state; Killington Peak, the second-highest; Camel’s Hump, the state’s third-highest; and Mount Abraham, the fifth-highest peak. About 77% of the state is covered by forest; the rest is covered in meadow, uplands, lakes, ponds, and swampy wetlands.
    Areas in Vermont administered by the National Park Service include the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park (in Woodstock) and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Climate

    The annual mean temperature for the state is 43 °F (6 °C). Vermont has a humid continental climate, with muddy springs, a generally mild early summer, hot Augusts; it has colorful autumns: Vermont’s hills reveal red, orange, and (on sugar maples) gold foliage as cold weather approaches. Winters are colder at higher elevations. It has a Koppen climate classification of Dfb, similar to Minsk, Stockholm, and Fargo.
    The rural northeastern section (dubbed the “Northeast Kingdom”) often averages 10 °F (-12 °C) colder than the southern areas of the state during winter. The annual snowfall averages between 60 to 100 inches (1,500 to 2,500 mm) depending on elevation.
    Vermont is the seventh coldest state in the country. In winter, until typical El Nino conditions, Vermont’s winters are “too cold to snow”; the air is too cold to contain sufficient moisture to prompt precipitation.
    The highest recorded temperature was 105 °F (41 °C), at Vernon, on July 4, 1911; the lowest recorded temperature was -50 °F (-46 °C), at Bloomfield, on December 30, 1933; this is the lowest temperature recorded in New England (Big Black River, Maine, also recorded a verified -50 °F (-46 °C) in 2009). The agricultural growing season ranges from 120 to 180 days.
    The USDA Plant hardiness zones for the state range between zone 3b (no colder than -35 °F (-37 °C)) in the Northeast Kingdom and northern part of the state, to zone 5b (no colder than -15 °F (-26 °C)) in the southern part of the state.
    The state receives between 2,000 and 2,400 hours of sunshine annually.

    Geology

    There are five distinct physiographic regions of Vermont. Categorized by geological and physical attributes, they are the Northeastern Highlands, the Green Mountains, the Taconic Mountains, the Champlain Lowlands, and the Vermont Piedmont.
    About 500 million years ago Vermont was part of Laurentia and located in the tropics.
    The central and southern Green Mountain range include the oldest rocks in Vermont, formed about one billion years ago during the first mountain building period (or orogeny). Subsequently, about 400 million years ago, the second mountain building period created Green Mountain peaks that were 15,000-20,000 feet (4,600-6,100 m) tall, three to four times their current height and comparable to the Himalayas. The geological pressures that created those peaks remain evident as the Champlain Thrust, running north-south to the west of the mountains (now the eastern shore of Lake Champlain). It is an example of geological fault thrusting where bedrock is pushed over the newer rock formation.
    As a result of tectonic formation, Vermont east of the Green Mountains tends to be formed from rocks produced in the Silurian and Devonian periods. Western Vermont mainly from the older Pre-Cambrian and Cambrian material.
    Several large deposits within the state contain granite. The Rock of Ages Quarry in Barre is one of the leading exporters of granite in the country. The work of the trained sculptors of this corporation can be seen 3 miles (4.8 km) down the road at the Hope Cemetery, where gravestones and mausoleums can be seen.
    Some buildings in Germany, Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi are constructed almost primarily of Vermont granite. Rock of Ages quarries two kinds of granite in Vermont: Barre Gray and Bethel White.
    The remains of the Chazy Formation can be observed in Isle La Motte. It was one of the first tropical reefs. It is the site of the limestone Fisk Quarry, which contains a collection of ancient marine fossils such as stromatoporoids. These fossils date back to 200 million years ago. It is believed that at one point, Vermont was connected to Africa (Pangaea) and the fossils found and the rock formations found on the coasts in both Africa and America are further evidence of the Pangaea theory.
    In the past four centuries, Vermont has experienced a few earthquakes rarely centered under Vermont, the highest being a Richter magnitude scale 6.0 in 1952.

    Fauna

    The state contains 41 species of reptiles and amphibians, 89 species of fish, of which 12 are non-native; 193 species of breeding birds, 58 species of mammals, more than 15,000 insect species, and 2,000 higher plant species, plus fungi, algae, and 75 different types of natural communities.
    Vermont contains one species of venomous snake, the Eastern timber rattlesnake, which is confined to a few acres in western Rutland County.
    By the mid-19th century, wild turkeys were exterminated in the state through overhunting and destruction of habitat. Sixteen were re-introduced in 1969 and had grown to an estimated flock of 45,000 in 2009.
    Since 1970, reduction of farmland has resulted in reduced environment for, and reduced numbers of various shrubland birds including the American woodcock, brown thrasher, Eastern towhee, willow flycatcher, golden-winged warbler, blue-winged warbler, field sparrow, and Baltimore oriole.
    DDT destroyed the eggshells of ospreys which resulted in their disappearance from the state. This species began reviving in 1998. As of 2010, they were no longer endangered in the state.
    White-nose syndrome killed an estimated two-thirds of all cave-wintering bats in the state from 2008 to 2010.
    The New England cottontail disappeared from the state in the early 1970s, out-competed by the eastern cottontail rabbit, imported in the 1800s for hunting, and which is better able to detect predators.

    Flora

    Vermont is in the temperate broadleaf and mixed forests biome. Much of the state, in particular the Green Mountains, is covered by the conifers and northern hardwoods of the New England-Acadian forests. The western border with New York and the area around Lake Champlain lies within the Eastern Great Lakes lowland forests. The southwest corner of the state and parts of the Connecticut River are covered by Northeastern coastal forests of mixed oak.
    Invasive wild honeysuckle has been deemed a threat to the state’s forests, native species of plants, and wildlife.
    Many of Vermont’s rivers, including the Winooski River, have been subjected to man-made barriers to prevent flooding.
    Climate change appears to be affecting the maple sugar industry. Sugar maples have been subject to stress by acid rain, asian longhorn beetles, pear thrips, and, in 2011, an excessive deer herd which is forced to eat bark in the winter. These maples need a certain amount of cold to produce sap for maple syrup. The time to tap these trees has shrunk to one week in some years. The tree may be replaced by the more aggressive Norway maples, effectively forcing the sugar maples to “migrate” north to Canada.

    History

    Pre-Columbian

    Between 8500 to 7000 BCE, at the time of the Champlain Sea, Native Americans inhabited and hunted in Vermont. During the Archaic period, from the 8th millennium BCE to 1000 BCE, Native Americans migrated year-round. During the Woodland period, from 1000 BCE to CE 1600, villages and trade networks were established, and ceramic and bow and arrow technology was developed. In the western part of the state there lived a small population of Algonquian-speaking tribes, including the Mohican and Abenaki peoples. Sometime between 1500 and 1600, the Iroquois drove many of the smaller native tribes out of Vermont, later using the area as a hunting ground and warring with the remaining Abenaki. The population in 1500 was estimated to be around 10,000 people.

    Colonial

    The first European to see Vermont is thought to have been Jacques Cartier in 1535. On July 30, 1609 French explorer Samuel de Champlain claimed Vermont as part of New France, and French settlers later erected Fort Lamotte in 1666 which was the first European settlement in Vermont.
    In 1638, a “violent” earthquake was felt throughout New England, centered in the St. Lawrence Valley. This was the first seismic event noted in Vermont.
    In 1690, a group of Dutch-British settlers from Albany established a settlement and trading post at Chimney Point 8 miles (13 km) west of present-day Addison.
    During Dummer’s War, the first permanent British settlement was established in 1724, with the construction of Fort Dummer protecting the nearby settlements of Dummerston and Brattleboro.
    From 1731 to 1734, the French constructed Fort St. Frederic which gave the French control of the New France/Vermont frontier region in the Lake Champlain Valley. With the outbreak of the French and Indian War in 1754, the French began construction of Fort Carillon at present-day Ticonderoga, New York in 1755. The British failed to take Fort St. Frederic or Fort Carillon between 1755 and 1758. In 1759, a combined force of 12,000 British regular and provincial troops under Sir Jeffery Amherst captured Carillon, after which the French abandoned Fort St. Frederic. Amherst then constructed Fort Crown Point next to the remains of the Fort St. Frederic, securing British control over the area.
    Following France’s loss in the French and Indian War, the 1763 Treaty of Paris gave control of the land to the British. Colonial settlement was limited by the crown to lands east of the Appalachians, and Vermont was divided nearly in half in a jagged line running from Fort William Henry in Lake George diagonally north-eastward to Lake Memphremagog. The end of the war brought new settlers to Vermont. Ultimately, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and New York all claimed this frontier area.
    On March 20, 1764, King George III established the boundary between New Hampshire and New York along the west bank of the Connecticut River, north of Massachusetts, and south of 45 degrees north latitude. When New York refused to recognize land titles known as the New Hampshire Grants (towns created by land grants sold by New Hampshire Governor Benning Wentworth), dissatisfied colonists organized in opposition, which led to the creation of independent Vermont on January 15, 1777. In 1770, Ethan Allen, his brothers Ira and Levi, and Seth Warner recruited an informal militia, known as the Green Mountain Boys, to protect the interests of the original New Hampshire settlers against the new migrants from New York.

    Independence and statehood

    On January 15, 1777, representatives of the New Hampshire Grants declared the independence of Vermont. For the first six months of its existence, it was called The Republic of New Connecticut.
    On June 2, 1777, a second convention of 72 delegates met to adopt the name “Vermont.” This was on the advice of a friendly Pennsylvanian who wrote to them on how to achieve admission into the newly independent United States as the 14th state. On July 4, the Constitution of Vermont was drafted at the Windsor Tavern; it was adopted by the delegates on July 8. This was among the first written constitutions in North America and was indisputably the first to abolish the institution of slavery, provide for universal adult male suffrage, and require support of public schools. It was in effect from 1777 to 1791. Slavery was banned again by state law on November 25, 1858.

    Revolutionary War

    The Battle of Bennington, fought on August 16, 1777, was a seminal event in the history of the state of Vermont.
    A combined American force, under General Stark’s command, attacked the British column at Hoosick, New York, just across the border from Bennington and killed or captured virtually the entire British detachment. General Burgoyne never recovered from this loss and eventually surrendered the remainder of his 6,000-man force at Saratoga, New York, on October 17.
    The Battles of Bennington and Saratoga are recognized as the turning point in the Revolutionary War because they were the first major defeat of a British army. The anniversary of the battle is still celebrated in Vermont as a legal holiday.
    The Battle of Hubbardton (July 7, 1777) was the only battle in present day Vermont and though the Continental forces were technically defeated, the British forces were damaged to the point that they did not pursue the Americans (retreating from Fort Ticonderoga) any further.

    Statehood and the antebellum era

    Vermont continued to govern itself as a sovereign entity based in the eastern town of Windsor for 14 years. The independent state of Vermont issued its own coinage from 1785 to 1788 and operated a statewide postal service. Thomas Chittenden was the Governor in 1778-1789 and in 1790-1791. The state was obliged to solve conflicting property ownership disputes with New Yorkers. On March 4, 1791, Vermont joined the federal union as the 14th state, and the first to enter the Union after the original 13 colonies.
    Vermont had a unicameral legislature until 1836.
    The mid-1850s onwards saw a transition from Vermonters mostly favoring slavery’s containment, to a far more serious opposition to the institution, producing the Radical Republican and abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens. While the Whig Party shriveled, and the Republican Party emerged, Vermont strongly trended in support of its candidates. In 1860 it voted for President Abraham Lincoln, giving him the largest margin of victory of any state.

    The Civil War

    During the American Civil War, Vermont sent more than 34,000 men into United States service. Almost 5,200 Vermonters, 15 percent, were killed or mortally wounded in action or died of disease, a higher percentage than any other state.
    The northernmost land action of the war, the St. Albans Raid, took place in Vermont.

    Postbellum era and beyond

    The first election in which women were allowed to vote was on December 18, 1880, when women were granted limited suffrage and were first allowed to vote in town elections, and then in state legislative races.
    Large-scale flooding occurred in early November 1927. During this incident, 84 people died including the state’s lieutenant-governor.
    The 1938 New England hurricane blew down 15,000,000 acres (61,000 km2) of trees, one-third of the total forest at the time in New England. 3 billion board feet were salvaged. Many of the older trees in the state are about 75 years old, dating from after this storm.
    Another flood occurred in 1973, causing the death of two people and millions of dollars in property damage.
    In 1964, the US Supreme Court decision in Reynolds v. Sims that forced “one-man, one-vote” redistricting on all states required large changes in Vermont, giving cities an equitable share of votes in both houses for the entire country. Until that time, counties had often been represented by area in state senates and were often unsympathetic to possible solutions to urban problems that would increase taxes.
    The governor called the 2011 flooding caused by Tropical Storm Irene one of the worst in the 20th and 21st century, second only to the flood of 1927. Vermont was the first state to introduce civil unions in July 2000, and in 2009 Vermont became the first state to introduce same-sex marriage by enacting a statute without being required to do so by a court decision.

    Population

    The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Vermont was 626,011 on July 1, 2012, a 0.004% increase since the 2010 United States Census. The center of population of Vermont is located in Washington County, in the town of Warren.
    According to the United States Census Bureau, as of 2012, Vermont has an estimated population of 626,011, which is an increase of -420, or -0.0% percent, from the prior year and an increase of 270, or 0.0% percent, since 2010. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 7,148 people (33,606 births minus 26,458 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 7,889 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 4,359 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 3,530 people. As of 2009, 47.8% of Vermont’s population was born outside the state, with first and second-generation Vermonters representing a majority of the population.
    Vermont is the least populous state in New England. In 2006 it had the second lowest birthrate in the nation, 42/1000 women. The median age of the work force was 42.3, the highest in the nation.
    In 2009, 12.6 percent of people over 15 were divorced. This was the fifth highest percentage in the nation.

    Economy

    In 2007, Vermont was ranked by Forbes magazine as 32nd among states in which to do business. It was 30th the previous year. In 2008, an economist said that the state had “a really stagnant economy, which is what we are forecasting for Vermont for the next 30 years.” In May 2010, Vermont’s 6.2 percent unemployment rate was the fourth lowest in the nation. This rate reflects the second sharpest decline among the 50 states since the prior May.
    According to the 2010 U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis report, Vermont’s gross state product (GSP) was $26 billion. Not accounting for size, this places the state 50th among the 50 states. It stood 34th in per capita GSP.

    Personal income

    The median household income from 2002 to 2004 was $45,692. This was 15th nationally. The median wage in the state in 2008 was $15.31 hourly or $31,845 annually. About 80 percent of the 68,000 Vermonters who qualify for food stamps, actually received them in 2007. 40 percent of seniors 75 years or older live on annual incomes of $21,660 or less.
    In 2011, 91,000 seniors got an annual average of $14,000 from Social Security. This comprised 59% of the average senior’s income. This contributed $1.7 billion to the state’s economy.

    Agriculture

    Agriculture contributes $2.6 billion, about 12%, directly and indirectly to the state’s economy. However, another study claims that agriculture contributed 2.2% of the state’s domestic product in 2000. In 2000, about 3 percent of the state’s working population engaged in agriculture.
    Over the past two centuries, logging has fallen off as over-cutting and the exploitation of other forests made Vermont’s forest less attractive. The decline of farms has resulted in a regrowth of Vermont’s forests due to ecological succession. Today, most of Vermont’s forests are secondary. The state and non-profit organizations are actively encouraging regrowth and careful forest management. Over 78 percent of the land area of the state is forested. Over 85 percent of that area is non-industrial, private forestland owned by individuals or families.
    Dairy farming is the primary source of agricultural income. In the last half of the 20th century, developers had plans to build condos and houses on what was relatively inexpensive, open land. Vermont’s government responded with a series of laws controlling development and with some pioneering initiatives to prevent the loss of Vermont’s dairy industry. Still, the number of Vermont dairy farms has declined more than 85 percent from the 11,206 dairy farms operating in 1947. In 2003 there were fewer than 1,500 dairy farms in the state; in 2006 there were 1,138; and in 2007 there were 1,087. The number of dairy farms has been diminishing by 10 percent annually.
    The number of cattle in Vermont had declined by 40 percent; however, milk production has doubled in the same period due to tripling the production per cow. While milk production rose, Vermont’s market share declined. Within a group of states supplying the Boston and New York City markets, Vermont was third in market share, with 10.6 percent; New York has 44.9 percent and Pennsylvania has 32.9 percent. In 2007, dairy farmers received a record $23.60 for 100 pounds (45 kg) of milk. This dropped in 2008 to $17. The average dairy farm produced 1.3 million pounds of milk annually in 2008.
    The dairy barn remains an iconic image of Vermont, but the 87 percent decrease in active dairy farms between 1947 and 2003 preservation of the dairy barns has increasingly become dependent upon a commitment to maintaining a legacy rather than basic need in the agricultural economy. The Vermont Barn Census, organized by a collaboration of educational and nonprofit state and local historic preservation programs, has developed educational and administrative systems for recording the number, condition, and features of barns throughout Vermont.
    In 2009, there were 543 organic farms. Twenty percent of the dairy farms were organic and 23 percent (128) vegetable farms were organic. Organic farming increased in 2006-07, but leveled off in 2008-09. Nor are any expected for 2010.
    A significant amount of milk is shipped into the Boston market. Therefore the Commonwealth of Massachusetts certifies that Vermont farms meet Massachusetts sanitary standards. Without this certification, a farmer may not sell milk for distribution into the bulk market.
    An important and growing part of Vermont’s economy is the manufacture and sale of artisan foods, fancy foods, and novelty items trading in part upon the Vermont “brand” which the state manages and defends. Examples of these specialty exports include Cabot Cheese, the Vermont Teddy Bear Company, Fine Paints of Europe, Vermont Butter and Cheese Company, several micro breweries, ginseng growers, Burton Snowboards, Lake Champlain Chocolates, King Arthur Flour, and Ben and Jerry’s Ice Cream.
    There were about 2,000 maple products producers in 2010. In 2001, Vermont produced 275,000 US gallons (1,040,000 L) of maple syrup, about one-quarter of U.S. production. For 2005 that number was 410,000 US gallons (1,600,000 l; 340,000 imp gal) accounting for 37 percent of national production. This rose to 920,000 US gallons (3,500,000 l; 770,000 imp gal) in 2009.
    Wine industry in Vermont started in 1985. There are 14 wineries today.
    Farms in the state were estimated to have hired 2,000 illegal immigrants as of 2005. Local authorities have ignored the problem, sympathizing with the employers about being able to efficiently run a farm.

    Manufacturing

    Vermont’s largest for-profit employer, IBM, in Essex Junction, provides 25 percent of all manufacturing jobs in Vermont, employing 6,800 workers in 2007. It is responsible for $1 billion of the state’s annual economy.
    A 2010 University of Connecticut study reported that Vermont, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire tied as the most costly states in the U.S. for manufacturers.

    Health

    An increasingly aging population is expected to improve this industry’s position in the state economy. In 2008, Fletcher Allen Health Care was the second largest employer of people in the state.
    In 2010, all of Vermont’s hospitals billed patients $3.76 billion, and collected $2 billion.
    92,000 people are enrolled in Medicare. In 2011, Medicare spent $740 million on health care in the state.

    Housing

    In 2007 Vermont was the 17th highest state in the nation for mortgage affordability. However, in 41 other states, inhabitants contributed within plus or minus 4 percent of Vermont’s 18.4 percent of household income to a mortgage.
    Housing prices did not rise much during the early 2000s. As a result, the collapse in real estate values was not that precipitous either. While foreclosure rose significantly in 2007, the state stood 50th (last, and best) in ratio of foreclosure filings to households. While housing sales dropped annually from 2004 to 2008, prices continued to rise.
    In 2007, Vermont was best in the country for construction of new energy efficient homes as evaluated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under the Energy Star program. However, about 60 percent of Vermont homes were heated with oil in 2008. In August 2008, the cost in Vermont of various heating sources per 1 million BTU ranged from $14.39 for cord wood to $43.50 for kerosene.
    While the number of houses sold in the state has dropped from 8,318 in 2004 to 8,120 in 2005, 6,919 in 2006, and 5,820 in 2007, the average price has continued to rise to $202,500 in 2008 ($200,000 in 2007).
    In 2009, the average rent for a two-bedroom apartment was $920 per month. Rental vacancy was 5.4 percent, the lowest in the nation. 2,800 people were counted as homeless in January 2010, 22 percent more than in 2008.
    In 2011, Vermont was fifth among the states with the greatest backlog of foreclosures needing court processing, taking an estimated 18 years. The national average was eight years.

    Labor

    As of 2006, there were 305,000 workers in Vermont. 11 percent of these are unionized. Out of a workforce of 299,200 workers, 52,000 were government jobs, federal, state and local.
    A modern high unemployment rate of 9 percent was reached in June 1976. A modern low of 2.4 percent was measured in February 2000. As of September 2010, the unemployment rate was 5.8 percent.
    Employment grew 7.5 percent from 2000 to 2006. From 1980 to 2000, employment grew by 3.4 percent; nationally it was up 4.6 percent. Real wages were $33,385 in 2006 constant dollars and remained there in 2010; the nation, $36,871.

    Insurance

    Captive insurance plays an increasingly large role in Vermont’s economy. With this form of alternative insurance, large corporations or industry associations form standalone insurance companies to insure their own risks, thereby substantially reducing their insurance premiums and gaining a significant measure of control over types of risks to be covered. There are also significant tax advantages to be gained from the formation and operation of captive insurance companies. According to the Insurance Information Institute, Vermont in 2009 was the world’s third-largest domicile for captive insurance companies, following Bermuda and the Cayman Islands. In 2009, there were 560 such companies. In 2010, the state had 900 such companies.

    Tourism

    Tourism is an important industry to the state. Some of the largest ski areas in New England are located in Vermont. Skiers and snowboarders visit Burke Mountain Ski Area, Bolton Valley, Stowe, Smugglers’ Notch, Killington Ski Resort, Mad River Glen, Sugarbush, Stratton, Jay Peak, Okemo, Suicide Six, Mount Snow, Bromley, and Magic Mountain Ski Area. Summer visitors tour resort towns like Stowe, Manchester, Quechee, Wilmington and Woodstock. Resorts, hotels, restaurants, and shops, designed to attract tourists, employ people year-round. Summer camps contribute to Vermont’s tourist economy.

    Lake Champlain
    Visitors participate in trout fishing, lake fishing, and ice fishing. Some hike the Long Trail.
    In winter, nordic and backcountry skiers visit to travel the length of the state on the Catamount Trail. Several horse shows are annual events. Vermont’s state parks, historic sites, museums, golf courses, and new boutique hotels with spas were designed to attract tourists.
    According to the 2000 Census, almost 15 percent of all housing units in Vermont were vacant and classified “for seasonal, recreational, or occasional use”. This was the second highest percentage nationwide, after Maine. In some Vermont cities, vacation homes owned by wealthy residents of New England and New York City constitute the bulk of all housing stock. According to one estimate, as of 2009, 84 percent of all houses in Ludlow, Vermont, were owned by out-of-state residents. Other notable vacation-home resorts include Manchester and Stowe.
    In 2005, visitors made an estimated 13.4 million trips to the state, spending $1.57 billion.
    In 2000-01, there were 4,579,719 skier and snowboarder visits to the state. There were 4,125,082 visits in 2009-2010, a rise from recent years.
    In 2008, there were 35,000 members of 138 snowmobiling clubs in Vermont. The combined association of clubs maintains 6,000 miles (9,700 km) of trail often over private lands. The industry is said to generate “hundreds of millions of dollars worth of business.”
    Hunting is controlled for black bear, wild turkeys, deer, and moose. There are 5,500 bears in the state. The goal is to keep the numbers between 4,500 and 6,000. In 2010, there were about 141,000 deer in the state, which is in range of government goals. However, these are distributed unevenly and when in excess of 10-15 per square mile, negatively impact timber growth.
    In 2012, hunting of migratory birds was limited to October 13 to December 16. Waterfowl hunting is also controlled by federal law.

    Quarrying

    The towns of Rutland and Barre are the traditional centers of marble and granite quarrying and carving in the U.S. For many years Vermont was also the headquarters of the smallest union in the U.S., the Stonecutters Association, of about 500 members. The first marble quarry in America was on Mount Aeolus overlooking East Dorset. Up the western side of the state runs the “Marble Valley” joining up with the “Slate Valley” that runs from just inside New York across from Chimney Point until it meets the “Granite Valley” that runs west past Barre, where is located the Rock of Ages quarry, the largest granite quarry in America.
    Vermont is the largest producer of slate in the country.
    Production of dimension stone is the greatest producer of revenues by quarrying.

    Non-profits and volunteerism

    There were 2,682 non-profit organizations in Vermont in 2008, with $2.8 billion in revenue. The state ranked ninth in the country for volunteerism for the period 2005-08. 35.6% of the population volunteered during this period. The national average was 26.4%.